Jump to content
2018 UJ SUMMER SILENT AUCTION HAS LAUNCHED Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
Briarscratch

Goose - it's what's for dinner

Recommended Posts

Briarscratch

Some may know I left my company of 9 years and started my own. While entrepreneurship is great, the market is still dismal and business is off to a slowish start.  I figured on this.

As a result, there is a whole lot of belt tightening going on in the Combstead.  During a recent budgetary meeting with the CDO (Chief Domestic Officer) I was informed that meat and milk are the two greatest grocery expenditures and unless I wanted to go vegetarian, I would have to procure my own.  Meat that is.  The milk is for the kids and they're exempt.

So when I was recently faced with a choice of shooting sporting clays or goose hunting the CDO weighed in.  She told me that while I couldn't spend money on shooting clay birds I was more than welcome, even required, to kill as many geese as legally allowed. As cheaply as possible.

Fortunately we like to eat geese and as long as I bully my way to the dead pile and snatch up the young and tender I'll be in good shape.

So....for those of you that also enjoy the Sirloin of the Soybeans what are you favorite recipes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben Hong

Wild geese are a hit and miss proposition - they can be very tough and dry, unless you have a foolproof way of discerning the age of them. That said, I have always use low and slow moist cooking processes to cook them, as in stews, curries, soups and braises. It is a dark meat so treat it like beef stew meat. Ground goose makes a beautiful substitute for ground beef in pasta sauces, shepherd's pie, sloppy joes, meat balls, etc. To make burgers out of ground goose, treat it like extra lean ground beef, that is you must mix in stuff like bread crumbs, oil, seasonings, or crumbled cheese.

Hint: after you have deboned the goose, put the carcass and all the trimmings into a roasting pan with the holy trinity of onions, celery and carrots, throw on some thyme, a couple of bay leaves, some ground pepper and roast the whole shebang until medium brown. Throw everything in a stock pot with enough water to cover and simmer it for a couple of hours. Skim off the fat, and strain the liquid into a clean container and you will have the best stock (bouillion) that money can't buy.

I will leave the roasting option to the more accomplished chefs among us.

Bon appetit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Briarscratch

Thanks Ben.  

The other night Betsy browned pearl onions and made a sauce that included ground cherries and black rasberry jam.  She roasted the breasts and we cut then thinly across the grain.  Added a fresh squash and green beans and it was fantastic.

I'm really looking forward to a goose rendang in the coming weeks but we also potroast too.   I'll definitely be taking your suggestions as well.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PartridgeCartridge

I like a classic James Bay roasted bird with spiced apples. There are also some german roasting recipes with sauerkraut that are quite good.

Problem with the geese are that no two ever taste the same roasted. You can kill two out of the same flock and one roasts up delicious and the other tastes like a dried up cow chip. Plucking whole Canadas is quite a chore. Plucking six Canadas can make you wish you never took up the sport in the first place.

After trying to cook many of these birds, the best, most consistent recipe in my opinion is this one. It only uses the breasts, but lets face it, most goose legs are pretty lousy anyways. If you have a hankerin' you can reduce the legs into a stock or a confit.

You can make this recipe in large batches and freeze the meat as it keeps quite well.

Using a fillet knife, breast out the bird leaving the skin on.

Soak the breasts for 8 hours in a solution of cold water and one cup of either brown sugar or molasses or maple syrup. Add one cup of kosher salt to the brine.

Put the breasts in a smoker, using cherry wood, and cold smoke for a few hours only to add flavor. Keep the temperature cool. If you dont have a smoker, smoke flavoring in the brine will work but not quite as good as true cold smoking

You can freeze the extra breasts raw like this.

Now take a few breasts and either roast at high or grill on high skin up until the meat is medium rare to medium. I like my goose pink and warm which is medium.

The breasts will carve like a london broil and will taste very beefy too. I like a bing cherry sauce on my goose and you can make it with cherries and brandy on the stove.

A-1 is also very good on goose.

We usually served it with rosemary roasted potatoes and a fall vegetable like butternut or acorn squash.

The whole meal is very kid/wife/guest friendly and tastes remarkably beefy.

Serve it with a really hearty cab. I like Bud with mine.

Hungry yet? Have fun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
River19

I figured I would go the same route as Ben mentioned if I had to bang out a few geese.

A couple years back we came back from a NY goose hunt with the breasts chunked and tenderized (it was a guided hunt with my FIL and the guides did the meat prep) and sealed.  I made some outstanding jerky from it.  Looking abck I could have gone the stew route but it was my first exposure to goose.

I like the PC method as well, I might have to give it a whirl.  I love cooking a London Broil.......inexpensive and tasty...

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Briarscratch

PC good call on the smoking.  I usually do brine them in a sugar salt solution...well I freeze the breasts in this solution in a ziplock.

But I also have a little chief smoker and will give that a try.  

As far as Jerky goes, I'm going to make a ton of it.  Suicidal birds willing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
B du B

I'll tell you what -- let's go out and if you're willing to eat them all, you can keep 13 of my 15 birds.

I've got nothing against eating goose myself, but I don't have enough freezers for 15 goose breasts, let alone whole birds for roasting...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PartridgeCartridge
I say we make him take us and help to shoot all of our limits knowing full well he will do all the cleaning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fase3
Down here in south La. when the geese first get here from the long migration down they are first cousin to shoe leather sole. After 6 weeks in the rice fields it is a new ball game. First arrivals go in a gumbo & cooked until they are falling apart. Those that have been in the fields long term and fattened up make good roasters-etc. A bunch of cajun seasonings goes a long way with both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
M. R. Byrd
Down here in south La. when the geese first get here from the long migration down they are first cousin to shoe leather sole. After 6 weeks in the rice fields it is a new ball game. First arrivals go in a gumbo & cooked until they are falling apart. Those that have been in the fields long term and fattened up make good roasters-etc. A bunch of cajun seasonings goes a long way with both.

Do you have a good goose gumbo recipe to share? We don't get much gumbo around Dodge. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
M. R. Byrd
I have found a good marinade for goose breast is Allegro.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PartridgeCartridge
I have found a good marinade for goose breast is Allegro.

One of my favorites too, especially on a big fat ribeye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Briarscratch
What's Allegro?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PartridgeCartridge
It is a very inexpensive marinade. It may be of spanish origin but most markets have it. Perfect blend of herbs/spices and not too much salt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BradSouth
Gumbo but make your rue on the heavy or thick side, or I marinade the goose breast in OJ for a day then rubbed a mexican mole that I bought at kroger and grilled it I have had many this way and they always taste the same but that recipe that PC posted sounded great.  Now speck goose is a bit diff ribeye in they sky....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×