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Briarscratch

Goose - it's what's for dinner

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M. R. Byrd

What's Allegro?

Here it is. I used the original on rib eyes last weekend  in Kansas City and they were so good. While in HyVee picking up the Allegro I saw there was a new "hot & spicy" version, that I will have to try really soon. There are several versions and so far I like them all except their "Hickory".

DSCF1240.jpg

Maynard & Murry

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Steve Hunts
On a budget, I can relate.  Picked up a pressure cooker to do more inexpensive cuts of meat like roasts, etc.  They do a good job of keeping the meat from drying out and use less energy and cook faster.  So far it has done a great job. Brown the meat first in the cooker with some oil. Add veggies later or they will turn to mush.We got a cheap model at Bed, Bath, and Beyond for about $20 and it works great.  Might be a good choice to "cook your goose".   :D

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MAArcher
I like goose jerky.  marinade in whisky, brown sugar, orange juice, black pepper, crushed red pepper, diced pickled hot banana peppers and salt.  The sugar makes it sticky but it tastes good.  Cut goose strips with grain for really chewy jerky, against the grain for easier chewing.

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Guest

I grew up in a house with 10 brothers and sisters and we were always on a budget.  My mom canned everything from the garden veggies, to fruit to pheasants and all the deer and antelope we could kill.  We used to shoot geese and she would can just the breast meat.  Canned in a pressure cooker in quarts jars with a teaspoon of granulated beef bouillon , a lump of beef tallow, a slice of onion and a clove of garlic.  It was great.

I like it so much that I can about 40 to 50 quarts of wild game every year.  Goose, deer, antelope etc are all terrific canned.   Plus it is easy to just open an jar and heat up.  For anyone on a budget I would consider this method because it is good and a great thing to teach to the next generation.

Nemont

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brymoore
Nemont - what type of recipes do you make with the canned meat?  Or do you just eat it straght?

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Briarscratch

I was wondering the same thing Bry.  It sounds good.

Thanks for all the good suggestions so far.  As a result of this morning's efforts, I've got eight goose breasts chilling in the fridge and my wife has enjoyed reading the responses.

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NW-Gsp
Thanks Ben.  

The other night Betsy browned pearl onions and made a sauce that included ground cherries and black rasberry jam.  She roasted the breasts and we cut then thinly across the grain.  Added a fresh squash and green beans and it was fantastic.

I'm really looking forward to a goose rendang in the coming weeks but we also potroast too.   I'll definitely be taking your suggestions as well.

Jeff

sounds like I would love recession at your house, that recipe sounds awesome.

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Guest
Nemont - what type of recipes do you make with the canned meat?  Or do you just eat it straght?

There are a bunch of ways to use canned meat.  The simpliest is to just heat is up on serve it over egg noodles.  It is great in a sandwich.  

Another favorite way is use it for stew meat.  It is super tender and fully cooked so you can put it in hot dishes as well.  

Or if you are like my kids they want it heated up and just spooned into bowls and eaten with homemade wheat bread and with homemade apple butter on the side.  

Anything you can do with cubed beef you can do with canned meat.

I have used it to make awesome pot pies in the dutch oven while camping.  

A quart of canned meat, a can of veg-all, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, paprika and salt and pepper to taste,

two tubes of ready to eat biscuits placed on top and cooked until the biscuits are done.  Nobody ever complains about that.

I use canned meat in alot of chillie recipes in place of ground chuck.

Nemont

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interlochen

For my money, you cannot beat a whole smoked Canada goose.  Granted they are not much fun to pluck, particularly when it is warm out.  I have found this recipe to work just as well on a 12 year old bird (according to the band) as with young of the year.  Given the work involved with plucking, I usually save my biggest birds for this treatment figuring that I get more meat for my efforts.

Pluck the entire goose, but don't bother with the wings.  Cut them off at the body using heavy shears or a chainsaw.  I like to wax my birds to make them look market ready, but you can use a propane torch to remove the down as well.  Check out commerical poultry sites for cheap wax.  It is 1/5th the cost of ordering it through a hunting catalog.

The next step is to cut off the head and legs and draw the guts out through the back door.  Rinse the interior as best you can.  Make a brine consisting of 1 cup kosher salt and 1 cup dark brown sugar per gallon of water.  You can add other spices if you like, but I don't think that you can taste them over the smoke.  Brine the bird completely submerged in a refrigerator for 24 to 48 hours.  Remove from the brine and let air dry at room temperature for at least an hour.

Smoke at approximately 225 degrees in a smoker (electric, gas, or charcoal) until a thermometer deep in the breast meat registers 145 degrees.  I like to use hickory, but oak works good as well.  You can also apply a glaze and or cracked pepper during the smoking process.

Let the bird cool to room temperature before carving so that it stays juicy.  I actually like it better cold from the refrigerator the next day best of all.  Sliced thin, you can use it any place you'd use roast beef.  It is great for sandwiches, appetizers, and the like.  Horseradish sauce goes great with it.  You can pick the meat off the legs and the remainder of the carcass for gumbo, tacos, or anywhere else you use shredded meat.

I take one of these birds to trout camp every year and there is always a fight to take the remainders home (if there are any).  I have also smoked mallards, woodducks, redheads, and several other varieties of waterfowl using this method with great success.

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Fishnfowler

I have smoked ducks but never a goose, sounds good.  My smoked duck always goes really fast.  I like to pull it out on winter ski trips with a good cab, some dry cheese, and rye bread.  I smoke a bunch at once and then freeze in vacuum bag.  

My latest go-to recipe for goose is:

1 cup any commercial teriyaki sauce

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/8 cup orange marmalade

1/2 cup red wine

2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp black pepper

cayenne to heat preference

medium minced onion

several cloves crushed garlic

The discount store teriyaki marinade is 1-1/2 cups teriyaki sauce, 1/4 cup orange juice concentrate, and 1 pack McCormick buffalo wing mix.  It is quick and tasty.  

Mix well, soak 2" cubes goose breast in fridge for 8-12 hours, place on kebobs and spiral bacon over whole kebob.  Grill and serve rare-medium rare.

Rob.

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bigjohnsd

When I was in college I ate alot of goose as it was easy to come by and cheap.

My favorite recipe is/was as follows:

Breast out 3 geese, using the edge of a saucer or a small plate pound the breasts between saran wrap to an even thickness of about one inch, use the edge of the saucer accross the grain on the skin side.

marinate the pounded goose breasts in mixture of 1 cup soy sauce, 1 cup sherry, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/2 cup onion diced and 2 tbsp minced garlic for 24 hours.

Heat up your old cast iron frying pan real hot! drop in 1/4 stick of butter and two of the breasts.  cook until brown on one side then turn and cook on the other.  this won't take too long, kind of like cooking minute steak.  they should be pink, not gray when you cut into them.

If you overcook they will be tough as hell.

Good luck, works equally well on snow geese!

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charlo slim

Here's one of the favorites around our house.

Chicken-fried goose cutlets.

Remove the breast filets carefully (save the "tenders" -- they are GREAT in stir-fry, etc).  Trim any fat and surface tissues. Lay breast filet with long axis perpendicular to you and cut "cutlets" across the grain, 3/4" to 1" thick. Take a meat hammer and pound the cutlets out to about 1/4" thick. You will be pounding on the cut side, i.e. pounding on the end grain, not the long grain axis. I have had best luck with a hammer that has pyramid-shaped grid on one side and chisel-type blades on the other - light pounding with chisel side, then finish with pyramid grid side. Tougher the meat, the more you want to pound it out - tough old canada or elk, pound it about as thin as you can without the cutlet starting to come apart.

Pan of milk, say 1 cup, depending on how much meat you are cooking. If you wanna get real fancy, use 2/3 milk, 1/3 dijon mustard. Soak pounded cutlets in milk for a few minutes.

Prepare 1 cup seasoned flour. Flour, salt and peppper (lots of pepper), and any other seasonings you wish. Prepare breading mix. 2/3 bread crumbs (I like Italian seasoned style), 1/3 grated Parmesan cheese.

Dredge/press cutlets in seasoned flour, really work the flour in to the cutlets. Then soak them in the milk again for a minute or 2. Then dredge/press cutlets in breading mix (again, don't be wimpy about pressing mixture in to meat).

Fry medium-medium high til golden-brown and starting to get crispy. In butter is best. If you are a gravy type, cover in mushroom soup (cream of, or golden). and simmer lightly for a another 5 or 10 minutes. Enjoy.

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Tim Frazier

I don't believe anyone will believe this till they try it but here it goes.

1.  Cover goose breast with milk and let sit in the fridge for at least three day.

2.  Rinse and let soak in vinager for 1-2 hours ONLY

3.  Rinse again in cold water

4.  Cut the breast paralel to the long side of the meat into 1/4" or so strips.  trim all the edges to get the fat off.  

5.  Rinse again

6.  We use a local rub called "Sweet as Hell" but any rub of your choice will work.  Work it in good, goose meat isn't wussy like that grouse meat you folks are always eating.

7.  prewarm the oven to 205* and lay the strips on a cookie sheet.  I flip them once at about 10-15 minutes and just make sure they aren't still pink.

My 3 kids, the wife and I,  put down two adult geese cooked like this while wathcing Dancing with the Stars the other evening.  It's good stuff

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charlo slim

So, how's it going with the the goozles, Scratch??  Here's some general hints, ideas, and favorite recipes (we eat ALOT of geese). Some of these are pasted from stuff I and others have posted elsewhere, but thought you might find it useful/interesting.

First -- determining age (broiler/roasters vs crock pot/grinder birds).  All geese with notched tail feathers are young birds, but not all young birds have notched tail feathers (large race, local geese will often molt out their juvenile tail feathers fairly early in the season). Among local birds (or any of the races actually) the largest and heaviest will tend to be adults.  Bony worn knobs on the leading edge of the wings generally mean adult bird. Notice how the skin tears away from the flesh and the amount/toughness of surface tissues "silverskin".  Compare how a notch-tailed bird cleans and tears with a big knob-winged one -- you will start to get a feel for it.

After pinfeathers are grown out in early season -- wild goose down makes SUPERB throws, comforters, pillows, etc.  Quality beats commercial down items all to heck.... more like eider down really than like commercial goose down.  Once ya get a system going, stripping down is alot easier and quicker than most people think.  My wife has become absolutely fanatic about the stuff, and will usually strip down from the birds even if we are going to filet/bone them later anyway.  Great, luxurious gifts.....IF you can bear to part with them.

First one isn't a recipe per se, just a use that we like alot -

Sausage has become one of our main uses for shot-up goose breast meat (not that I ever fail to head-shoot them, of course), legs, thighs, wings etc. So thought I'd post up some thoughts on the process. Variations or counter-suggestions appreciated.

We do both sage country breakfast sausage and Italian sausage for pizza, lasagna, etc. even chilli. Have yet to run into anyone who turns nose up at either.  Two brands of seasoning we can get locally are Leggs and Harveys. Also have bought some great spice mixes via mail order from a place called Spokane spice (comes up on Google). All are good, just depends on what you like.

I have been grinding 50:50, goose and pork butt (high shoulder cut, pretty fatty usually but with only a small amount of bone that is easily removed). If you shop and dicker around a bit, alot of meat markets will sell you a full tray (2 or 3 butts), before they have to split/process them for pretty reasonable price - usually $1-1.50/lb around here anyway. Seems like they are often happier to sell it more toward cost if you can order it ahead of time, so they have the extra stock coming in from their supplier, rather than needing to juggle stock and avoid running out themselves. Also, some places you can also get/order pork trim of varying fat content for even less. Just looked the other day at the supermarket, and breakfast sausage (looked like about half fat, one quarter lips and tits, and one quarter meat) was $3.19 a pound. We usually cube the goose and pork, and sprinkle the mixture evenly over the cubes, rather than trying to spice it all after already ground.The goose meat is really dense compared to pork, so I will often grind the goose once through a med-fine "burger" size plate, grind the pork once through a coarser sausage plate, then combine, mix, and run the whole batch through the sausage plate again. Of course, just one pass through the sausage plate on the goose will give you a little more texture in the final product if that is what you want. Really important to keep the meat VERY cold (not frozen), or the pork will start to goo out on ya.

Lemme see, what else?  Cook it slow, but well done of course, may need a little olive oil if frying.  Oh yeah, we have taken to wrapping bulk in 1'ish pound packages rather than links or patties. Just seems like the bulk wrap stuff keeps better frozen than the others (real hard to wrap them tight enough to really keep air/freezer burn away). Anyway, I think this is a great way to get an excellent, lean sausage at a great price -- plus all the fun of course.

DELI-STYLE CORNED GOOSE

This recipe has been adapted (slightly) from a corned beef recipe in the Morton Home Meat Curing Guide : http://www.mortonsalt.com/recipes/re...sp?recipeid=43

Quite simple really.... and very tasty in cold sandwiches, reubens, cb hash, basically any corned beef dish. We tend to use clean filets (no shot holes) for this recipe.

6 to 8 goose breast filets (4 to 6 lbs)

5 tablespoons Morton Tenderquick mix

2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

1 teaspoon ground paprika

1 teaspoon ground bay leaves

1 teaspoon ground allspice

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Trim, skin, and clean up breast filets (or beef brisket or boneless cut of deer, elk, etc)

In a small bowl, mix Morton Tender Quick and remaining dry ingredients and spices (Do NOT substitute any "meat tenderizer" for Morton Tender Quick, different stuff -- will NOT work)

Thoroughly rub mixture into all sides of breast filets.

Place filets into a plastic bag and close securely. Place in refrigerator and allow to cure 5 days per inch of meat thickness (a week seems to work fine for goose breasts).

Place filets in Dutch Oven or other large pot and add water to cover. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and cover. Simmer until tender, about 3 hours. Add water as needed.  Allow to cool.  Slice thin, across the grain. Enjoy

CROCK POT GOOSE BBQ

Cut shot up (or not) breast meat into 3/4" slices across grain, check carefully for steel shot of course. Put skinned legs,thighs, wings, breast meat etc into crockpot. Cover with apple cider, maybe a tablespoon of brown sugar.  Cook covered on low heat until meat starts to fall off bone 5-6+ hours usually.  Dump cider, debone goose, break/cut/pull meat into pieces, however chunky or not you like.  Return meat to crockpot, cover with your favorite BBQ sauce, stir, reheat, serve.  

Finally, goose is our all-time favorite jerky. Elk, deer, bison, emu, bar none.  Have tried a ton of different spice/cures, home made and otherwise, but finally settled on one commercial cure -- San Angelo Big Buck Jerky Cure, according to package directions, sometimes with a little extra pepper.  Always tell folks it is an old family heirloom recipe.  

NOW QUIT READING ALL THESE DUMB RECIPES AND GET OUT THERE AND KILL SOME GEESE!!!!

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Guest

I currently have 8 goose breast from the Youth opener, funny how I ended up with all the geese :cool:, soaking in a brine made of:

Ingredients:

1 gallon cold water

2 quarts apple juice

2 quarts orange juice

2 cup salt (3 cups Kosher or coarse salt)

1/2 cup brown sugar

10 whole cloves

1 tablespoon ground nutmeg

Preparation:

Pour apple and orange juice into a large pot over a medium heat. Add salt, brown sugar, cloves and nutmeg. Simmer for 15 minutes until salt and sugar are completely dissolved. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Add cold water.

Pour brine over top

They will go onto the smoker tonight for about four hours.  Then you can eat them hot or cold.  It is great as a snack sliced thin and served with cheese, crackers and a cold beer.  It makes a great sandwich, put it in on a plate with a teaspoon of water to make steam and microwave until hot, put spicy mustard on a good rye bread and thin sliced warmed smoked goose.  :oh:

Nemont

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