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Brad Eden

Cant Lose Woodcock Recipe

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Laminarman
This is a fantastic recipe.  I have a great portfolio of game recipes and this is among the best.  I consider myself a pretty good game cook since I am not of the "put it in mushroom soup casserole" or "grind it" school.  My son ate most of it however, and that's a great thing.  He also loves venison.  My 3 year old daughter loved the rice, and asked for another piece of "Woocah" saying the legs are "awful tiny!"  Thank you for sharing this, it was worth preparing.  I find the wok to be the best thing for stir fry recipes.  I put the little side rack in it, sear the legs for a minute or two, add the breasts, sear them on each side to rare, remove the meat and put it on the rack in the wok.  Reduce the marinade after removing the ginger, toss the meat back in for a minute with chopped water chestnuts, pour the whole thing on top of wild rice, top with chopped green onions or scallions.  Before this was done I seared a head of bok choy in sesame/canola oil, salted it, tossed in some flakes of red pepper and this sat aside until the rest was done.  A FINE meal.

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12ette

I made this by request for my FIL.  I set them to soak last night, I hope that will be fine.  I am limited on time today, early Xmas supper.  

Ben, have you ever used mushroom flavored soy?  I was at "Win Fa" a local  market and the proprietor insisted I try it.

Oh could you tell me (I never remember to ask) what does Win Fa translate to in English?

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Ben Hong

"Win Fa" . Terms like this transliteration to English are virtually impossible to translate. It could mean literally 100 different things due to which main dialect  used (Mandarin or Cantonese),  what sub dialect and accent used, no tonal indicators, etc. etc. If I were to say it 12 different ways in the two main dialects, "Win Fa" could mean cloudy flowers, my own flower, dissipating clouds, earned prosperity, changing fortune, my own luck, get the picture? Because there are 7 tones in Cantonese, and 4 tones in Mandarin, one needs the written scrip to translate the term accurately. Even then the translator would need a contextual guide...oy oy!!

Mushroom soy is a slightly richer version of the traditional dark soy that most Chinese use for cooking. In cooking (I use dark soys), the two are indistinguishable from each other. As a dip, there is a richer, rounder taste to mushroom soy. Being lazy, I just use the ordinary light (NOT lite) soy sauces for every thing.

Oh, there are literally dozens of soy sauces but the key words to look for are : naturally brewed. Stay away from the mass produced (for the white guys :devil: ) swill that contains monosodium glutamate (msg), and no mention of brewing.

Some common brands are Kikoman, Kimlan, Kung Fu, and my favourite Pearl River Bridge.

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12ette

Thanks Ben.  

It is indeed Pearl River Bridge.

Worked out amazingly well.  

Took the wok to a dark red colour added mustard oil (really like this oil) and away we went.  Meat was nicely charred outside and mid rare inside.  Did the same with some ducks and wow.  

You sure can scare folks when flames shoot up from the wok.  

Cheers.

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Ben Hong

TTT

WC season is almost on us so this is just a reminder  to make the most of your birds.

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DTB

I'm not a cook by any means but I just did a batch of snipe with this recipe and it is now my favorite snipe preparation.

Mr.Hong,

Does the ginger add the heat I was getting?  I may need to back off on the ginger a little or could the ginger vary with storage time?

Thanks Ben and Brad for the idea,

        Dave

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Backlash
I'm not a cook by any means but I just did a batch of snipe with this recipe and it is now my favorite snipe preparation.

Dave, glad you tried this as it is now one of my favorite ways to prepare birds.  I've used it with dove, wood duck, teal, and pintail and all were outstanding just like w'cock. When I can actually hit snipe, I'll try it with those too!

Heck, even bonita may be made palatable with this marinade.  No more 'Tuna Surprise'.

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Ben Hong
DTB, the amount of ginger (about 2 quarter sized pieces thinly minced) adds more flavour than heat. Of course if you like heat, and I do, please feel free to add a pinch of crushed chilies.

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Henry Rackliff
I may have an invite to hunt eiders off the coast of Maine in January.  Do you think this would work with them?  I'm concerned about how they will taste.

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Talon1

I don't know what Eiders taste like, but I have tried this recipe on pheasants, quail, chukars, huns, and chicken and it is a favorite around here for sure.

I think this recipe would make any bird taste great.

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Cooter Brown

I've made this recipe several times and it is wonderful.  Tonight I had a couple of timberdoodles and none of the other ingredients save garlic and sesame oil.  Put kosher salt, black pepper and a little sesame oil on the fileted breasts and the legs/thighs.

I started the legs first (olive oil and butter), browned them, added the minced garlic, then the breasts for just a couple of minutes, if that.  Put over rice.

I had a hot pan and the garlic browned much more than I wanted--some of it got pretty crispy.  It turned out fantastic.  Very flavorful yet subtle, with just a hint of the sesame oil.  Excellent!  I'll do the full monty again with the soy sauce etc. but I'll do it this way again for sure.

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Ben Hong
TTT

WC season is almost on us so this is just a reminder  to make the most of your birds.

To help you eat your bounty.

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Woodruffie
Tried this recipe and it is the best I have made and eaten.I can now look foreward to eating what I enjoy hunting. I give it a 10.

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Brad Eden
To top for 2014 Woodcock seasons.

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northern_hunting_mom
This recipe is amazing. It recycles every year on the UJ BB for a good reason. Since it does, I don't feel silly for answering a 4 year old question. Not any cooking oil will work. There are 2 main reasons for this. The flavor of the sesame oil is a big part of the dish. The other reason is the high flashpoint for sesame oil. It can withstand high heat.

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