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PartridgeCartridge

Game Shooting Better III

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PartridgeCartridge
group hug

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quailguy

Good stuff, PC. Thanks.

For me anyway, long crossers demand a somewhat more deliberate pace, but I think you have explained "the shot" really well.

Best regards,

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Guest
There is a very good article by Marty Fischer in the latest (March) issue of Sporting Clays Magazine about insertion points on dropping targets.  See pages 24 and 25.

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Bryan Lee

Hey PC,

I have to admit I'm having trouble envisioning the cut off of the bird aspect.

I try to follow the Jack Mitchell/Brian Bilinski/Ken Davies Churchill method and don't recall a "cut the bird off" line of thinking. All your other points are in that method of shooting.

On open field birds I establish a flight line and move through the bird letting my brain compute the proper lead. On grouse I just pray.....Sometimes that works!

Now keep in mind I shoot sporting clays for fun and to hopefully help me become a better wingshot. Is this concept borne of clay shooting??

I want to learn more about this cut the bird off concept. Once Amy is healed up I'm sure we'll get the chance.

Bryan

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PartridgeCartridge
On open field birds I establish a flight line and move through the bird letting my brain compute the proper lead. On grouse I just pray.....Sometimes that works!

Brian,

There are many times when moving thru a bird is the worst and most inconsistent way of hitting certain types of birds, either clay or feathered. When you tell me you are moving thru a bird, that suggests that you have successfully cut a bird off, or inserted from the rear or the rear edge.

So, in essence you are cutting off already. Your method is a swing thru approach. Simpler,softer targets with less speed and acute angles can be dealt with this approach.

When you start to deal with more acute angles, speed and distance, this type of insertion will not break or kill birds with the same consistency that more advanced insertion methods will.

Let me show you and Eddy some other ways and I'm sure you will get the concept and see the benefits of more sophisticated insertion methods.

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Ben

Pc thanks for your time to put these topics together.  

as allways there is reenforcement of skills and new or new angle to skills to ponder and try.  Any way as I read these posts and ponder and pratice, I have improved my tecnique.  Thanks to all of you who participate in these threads. This is some of the best use of the internet.  

Ben

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ckfowler180
Birds that are rising and quartering away (almost) all fall for me.  I consistently miss birds that come up 20 yards out, level out and crossing slightly away are actually descending in relation to me with level flight.  Other than just getting myself to visualize a flight path insertion low and left (R-L crosser), is there a secret to these?

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PartridgeCartridge
Birds that are rising and quartering away (almost) all fall for me.  I consistently miss birds that come up 20 yards out, level out and crossing slightly away are actually descending in relation to me with level flight.  Other than just getting myself to visualize a flight path insertion low and left (R-L crosser), is there a secret to these?

As you descibe it, it sounds like the only thing that has changed is the distance with a slight down angle.

This kind of shot can be handled and practiced with clays easily. A big help for you may be to learn to "play" farther away from the bird. Your cutoffs/insertions will be further in front than you may comfortable with but I suspect your missing is either over or behind on these.

If you "play" too close to the bird on farther shots, a common problem becomes "target occlusion". This is when the target/bird crowds the barrels and causes you to  try to see the target better usually by lifting your head to peek. And you know what happens then.

Use you eyes and don't handicap them by playing to close too the bird. Come in from below and don't be afraid to have some room out in front of the bird. Try it.

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ckfowler180

I think I need to get a better idea on where my insertion into the bird's flight comes and agree I am likely above and behind them.  Waterfowl that hang cupped over decoys I take but ones that drop like rocks (woodies on small stream down through trees) I do better to stand up and wait till they flare, shoot on the way out.  On the clays course, birds thrown from behind and above are a waste of my shells and only a couple accidentally break if thrown crossing from higher up.  Birds thrown towards me I can break well if I get on them soon but waiting as they get closer and start to stall makes them safe.  Teal stations I shoot OK if I get them at or before zenith but if they get ahead of that it is hopeless.

Since I shoot over a pointing dog mostly, my presentations most often are rising and quartering away and I do OK.  When I get to hunt over a friend's flusher, distance and target presentation changes and I suck.  I don't need to fill my freezer and rarely shoot for flusher buddies in competition or do tower shoots but I hate when the dogs does their part and I mess up on mine.  I am also confident that part of this is in my head now as they are my nemesis types of shots and I wince when I have to take them already thinking I will miss.

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Chukarman

 Birds thrown towards me I can break well if I get on them soon but waiting as they get closer and start to stall makes them safe.  Teal stations I shoot OK if I get them at or before zenith but if they get ahead of that it is hopeless.

I have noticed that shooting 'teal' type targets and true droppers is tough for people who use a swing through method.

Shooting 'teal' targets, I have (finally) learned to start with a high muzzle and insert AHEAD of the riser - the target is never seen above the gun, but is tracked with the other eye looking under the gun. This makes shooting them a mount and shoot proposition. I try to take them just before they reach the zenith, if the presentation allows for it. This is a vertical cut-off.

Droppers are puzzling, but if the gun is mounted to the bottom of the target and the move to below the target starts as the gun comes up, they become much easier. Don't look at the gun!

Sorry, PC, hope I am not stepping on your lines...

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PartridgeCartridge

No problem Chukarman. These are the kinds of answers that help folks out. As soon as some start to realize that one approach is limited in its consistent application, they will usually try something new.

And often times better.

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fuess
Did you figure out how to hit the 60 yrd quatering target thrown that hovers over the corn???

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ckfowler180
Did you figure out how to hit the 60 yrd quatering target thrown that hovers over the corn???

I have my gunner Bill take those for me.  Waterfowler at birth and dove marksman.  He has my dog retrieve them as he is currently dogless.

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wheil17
PC can you give an anecdote in regards to using your eyes efficiently? Maybe in a pointed grouse situation and you have an idea where the grouse is holding....

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