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Peent

Pork on the Weber

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Peent
My wife informed me today that a herd of her relatives are going to descend on our home Saturday for a BBQ and it is up to me to please them.  Please someone rescue me with a recipe for some kind of pork I can cook slowly on a Weber charcoal grill, hopefully taking hours of my time so I can sit on the deck and look important as I drink beer and talk smart.  We are looking at about 15 people give or take 5.  Beans may be in the cards too as they are known for their hot air.

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12ette

Pork butt is always good, add some coleslaw and beans....

Ribs can be done but you will need a lot of them for 15 ppl.

A suckling pig is always nice to have and they sell here for $1/lb.  a couple 20lb-ers would be nice.

You can cook a whole ham.

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Peent
Suckling pig.  Hmm.  I wonder if I can buy that locally.  The shock value intrigues me!

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bigjohnsd
Pork shanks braised first then finished on the grill.  Pork shanks are cheap and you get about 20 in a thkrty pound box. Lots of meat as well as crispy goodness.BBQ Pork Shank Recipe

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Chukarman

Classic pulled pork will give you plenty of time for a number of beers.

A slow cooked pork shoulder with hickory smoke... pulled from the bone and served with Lexington sauce is amazing. Add a side of coleslaw, dill pickles, BBQ beans, white bread and a cold one and you have the makings of a great picnic.

I use salt, lime juice, and a Jamaican jerk dry rub with allspice, brown sugar, scotch bonnet pepper flakes and other mystery stuff in it. Rub thoroughly into the pork and refrigerate about 12 - 24 hours before cooking. I use a very low temperature (about 250 - 275), in a roasting pan with rack and water in a second side pan. Wrap some wood chips- hickory is traditional - in foil, put on the grill (punch some holes in the foil), and cook with the grill lid on for about 4 to 6 hours, depending on the size of the shoulder. This is the 'quick' pulled pork method. The sauce goes on the side. Hope that you like it.

Lexington Sauce:

2-1/2 Cups apple cider vinegar

1/2 Cup tomato ketsup

2 -3 Tablespoons packed brown sugar

1 -2 Tablespoons Louisiana hot sauce (Crystal or similar)

1/2 teaspoon of Liquid Smoke (Hickory)

4 Teaspoons of salt

4 Teaspoons red pepper flakes

1 Teaspoon ground black pepper

1 Teaspoon ground white pepper

1-1/2 Teaspoons of the dry rub used on the pork shoulder

I heat the vinegar, add all the ingredients and stir until smooth. Then I put it in a clean jar, allow it to cool, and put it in the fridge for storage. When serving, warm the sauce and provide individual side bowls for dipping the pulled pork.

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Hub

Depends on how big of eaters you're dealing with, but I'd go with pulled pork from a bone in pork shoulder, maybe 2 if the relatives can really put it away.  Here is one of my favorite rub recipes (enough for about 2 12 pound pork shoulders)

2 tablespoons brown sugar

2 tablespoons smoked paprika

3 teaspoons chili powder

3 teaspoons cumin

2 teaspoons fresh ground black peppar

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon cayenne

Trim the skin off the shoulder and remove a majority of the fat.  Work the rub into the meat as much as possible.  I like to use rubber spatulas because then the rub sticks to the meat and not to my hand.  Get the rub on a good hour before you get the shoulder on the grill.  It gives the meat the time to come to room temperature which is important if you want a decent smoke line in your meat.  Get yourself 8-10 half fist sized lumps of hickory.  Soak the heck out of them and rap them in foil before adding them to the briquettes as needed.  They smoke a lot longer this way.  I use about one an hour.  I'm shooting for a constant 300 degrees (indirect with the coals on one side and the meat on the other) on my grill.  A 12-14# shoulder cooking at 300 degrees takes in the neighborhood of 8-10 hours to come up to an internal 185 degrees which is where I feel a pork shoulder cooked for that lenght of time has melted the connective tissue.  Spikes and drops in temp dry out meat and reduce the final product.  Make sure the fat cap is placed up so the shoulder is essentially self basting.  I turn my shoulder a full turn about half way through to make sure both sides are receiving even smoke and heat.  Keep an eye on the meat toward the end and it starts darkening you can cover the top of it with tin foil (the Texas crutch) for the last few hours.  Let it stand about 30 minutes before you start pulling it.  I like mine on an onion or kaiser roll.  Splash it with a little of your favorite barbacue sauce if you like, but if you hit it with enogh rub and snoke it won't really need it.

Some supplies make this job easier.  The weber grates that have the flip up sides for adding coal make things nice.  Grill baskets to hold the briquettes work well.  A cordless digital thermometer saves on having to open the grill more than you should.  I like that I can drag it around the house and not have to keep an eye on the grill for 10 hours.

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Ben Hong
I have just brought home a 10 lb. pork butt this afternoon. Looks like pulled pork, cornbread, bbq beans. sweet potato fries, and slaw for 8-10 people on Saturday. I believe that I will be using Hub's rub (!!) and Chukarman's Lexington sauce :love: .

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michael brown

pick one i wright it down for you..

-grilled creole wild boar tenderloin

-grilled boar tenderloin with peach bbq sauce

-braised loin of wild boar

-curried wild pig

-wild boar stew

-wild boar chops

-wild hog chops

-corn bread stuffed wild boar chops

-wild boar and kraut casserole

-roast of wild boar

-roasted loin of wild boar with feta reduction

-marinated and smoked wild hog

-barbecue pulled wild boar sandwich

-bittersweet plantation sugar-cured smokehouse ham

-crown roast of wild boar with shoepeg corn bread stuffing

-cochon de lait

just let me know what sounds good to you

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Peent

Man they all look good.  We decided on the Boston Butt, thinking a ten pounder or maybe 2 6 pounders.  All my Wife's relatives can "put it away."  Have not decided what kind of rub to use yet.  I want to try to impart a smoked flavor.

I don't have any smoking wood set aside, but where I am working today I can find black cherry.  I don't have much experience smoking, can I use green wood?

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Peent
pick one i wright it down for you..

-grilled creole wild boar tenderloin

-grilled boar tenderloin with peach bbq sauce

-braised loin of wild boar

-curried wild pig

-wild boar stew

-wild boar chops

-wild hog chops

-corn bread stuffed wild boar chops

-wild boar and kraut casserole

-roast of wild boar

-roasted loin of wild boar with feta reduction

-marinated and smoked wild hog

-barbecue pulled wild boar sandwich

-bittersweet plantation sugar-cured smokehouse ham

-crown roast of wild boar with shoepeg corn bread stuffing

-cochon de lait

just let me know what sounds good to you

I love curry, how is that curried wild pig one?

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Hub

Do you have a Menards around you?  They sell bags of all the smoking type woods in the grill section.  Minnesota doesn't locally produce much except for apple and alder which I don't particularly like for pork unless were talking apple smoked bacon.

I forgot to add.....I don't smoke with green wood.  I think it imparts an acrid taste to the meat.

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Peent
Grand Rapids, no menards.  Will have to check L&M.

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Hub
Walmart would have some too....but I try not to give them money if possible.

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Phred
I had to pop a beer just to read this.  Delicious.

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michael brown

i also have about alot homemade rub recipes if interested

-smoke and spicy game rub

-cajun game rub

-creole barbecue game rub

-hunters dry rub blend

-curry-pepper rub

-szechuan and green peppercorn rub

-game bird dry rub

-basic game rub

curried wild pig

prep time 1 1/2 hours

6-8servings

ingredients:

-2 pounds boar round steak cut into 1/2 inch pieces

-4 tbsps curry powder, divided

-salt and cracked pepper to tast

-granulated garlic to tast

-1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

-1/2 cup vegetable oil, divided

-2 cups fresh broccoli florets

-2 cups sliced carrots

-2 cups sliced celery

-4 tbsps butter

-1/4 cup flour

-3 cups chicken or game stock

method:

in a large bowl combine boar pieces 2 tablespoons curry powder salt pepper granulated garlic and red pepper flakes cover and chill 1 hour in a large skillet or wok heat 1/4 cup vegetable oil over medium high heat add boar pieces and cook 5-7 minutes or until well browned transfer boar pieces to separate bowl then return skillet to stovetop heat remaining 1/4 cup vegetable oil over medium high heat add broccoli carrots and celery cook 8-10 minutes or until vegetables are tender-crisp stirring frequently transfer vegetables into bowl with boar and return to skillet to stovetop add butter to skillet and reduce heat to medium add flour whisking constantly until a light brown roux is achieved add stock  stirring thoroughly return boar and vegetables to skillet and cook 2-3 minutes or until sauce is thickened stirring constantly season to taste with salt and pepper and remaining curry powder serve hot over rice

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