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    • Brad Eden

      WELCOME NEW UJ MEMBERS   06/25/2017

      It seems the word is out and UJ is enjoying a steady stream of newly Registered Members. Welcome to all of you, and we are all looking forward to your positive participation. I strongly suggest you review the Board Guidelines that have been in place since 2002. The most significant thing being that UJ is a NO POLITICS BOARD. LInk:  UJ BOARD GUIDELINES   Also UJ stays afloat mainly through Member Donations. Once a Donation is made you are placed in the Contributing Member Group with extra Priviliges. I am getting very few new Donations so hopefully this will spur that on a bit. Link:  New Members/Donations/Priviliges
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Hunshatt

? For the guys with "endurance" pointing dogs

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irish Eyes
When I had the labs, I could have hunted them well over 8 hours a day. Problem was they got real antsy sitting in that blind all day.

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jbeck
Last year, I had the Astro on Gretta up in Potter County for 2 days of hunting.  I didn't record distances, but in the AM trip on day 1, before lunch, average speed was just a little over 6.5 MPH.  We broke for lunch, and then hunted the afternoon from about 1:00 - 4:40, and the average speed was 5.75 mph.  The next day, it was pretty much the same.  There was no noticeable speed loss between day 1 and day 2.  I haven't tried 3 days in a row with the Astro on, so I am not sure.  My guess is she would slow down significantly on the 3rd day.  We did breaks about minutes of maybe 5-10 minutes.  There were 6 birds pointed on the first day, 2 on the second day.

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Hunshatt
When I had the labs, I could have hunted them well over 8 hours a day. Problem was they got real antsy sitting in that blind all day.

roflmao.gifroflmao.gifroflmao.gif

Becky, what kind of casts was she making(distance) ? and what would guess her average distance was from you, on a regular basis?

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kadehippy
Seeing as how I have an English Setter that is very smart and I never miss we usually have our limit in a couple of hours each day so distance traveled  isn't a problem  :devil:

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Hunshatt
:<img src=:'>  :<img src=:'>

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roysetters3

There is no real way to compare "endurance" among dogs that hunt different terrains. It is difficult to do even when the same dog is hunting different terrains. I run all my dogs with Astros, and check how far each runs after each day. Variations in run with a given dog can tell you whether something is wrong, an injury, illness, or just getting worn out. I hunt all types of gamebird habitat each year, from chukar slopes to prairies, to forest grouse cover, to deserts. Which is toughest on the dogs? Per hour, I'd say chin high Kansas CRP is toughest on dogs. Cover like this....

IMG_8460.jpg

Usually, those hunts last a half day or less because in average years or better, you have your limit by then. My dogs range from 100 to 300 yards away in cover like that and rarely exceed my walking distance x 3, according to the Astro.

The hardest hunts per day for my dogs are on the chukar slopes because those are most likely to be all day hunts - when you get back to the truck, you are done because you are not going to climb those mountains again that day.

IMG_6344.jpg

On the chukar slopes, the dogs can see where you are, so they range farther, 200 yards to 800 yards, farther sometimes. The farthest my dogs ever run in a day there is about 42 miles. If you think your dogs are going much farther than that, you probably don't have an Astro on them.

An interesting sidenote: often you'll be surprised when you check the mileage. I usually run 3 dogs down at once and quite often the shortest range dog will run just as far or farther (in number of miles) as the big runners, the dogs that get way out there.

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Bill Calton

For me, the primary difference maker is heat.  When I'm away from home I currently travel with 6 dogs.  Pointers.  At the start of quail season in Texas and NM and Arizona the weather can be pretty hot.  Or, for that matter, in Sep in Montana or Idaho.  Hunting in the heat can really wear a dog out in a short time.  You can use up several dogs each day in such conditions.

Some of you remember several years ago there was an unseasonably hot opening weekend for pheasant in the Dakotas that caused a lot of stress for dogs.

In a state where there are a lot of hunters on public land I regularly see "all day" dogs following along behind the hunters.  All day fetchers maybe.

Later in the year when temps stay down all day the dogs last longer.  How's that for an astute observation!

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Hub
On my biggest days I'll run from a half hour before sunrise until half hour after sunset (maybe 12 hours during October) minus maybe 1.5 hours of driving switching spots.  I have two dogs and switch them out about every two hours unless one looks bad and then I'll lean on the other.  I can keep that up for a 6 days or so on an out of state trip.  I don't run an astro, but have clocked 22 miles on a pedometer and know the dogs are working a hell of alot harder than that.  Sometimes my belts don't tighten enough at the end of a trip and my wife is always more salty about how the dogs look.

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jbeck
When I had the labs, I could have hunted them well over 8 hours a day. Problem was they got real antsy sitting in that blind all day.

roflmao.gifroflmao.gifroflmao.gif

Becky, what kind of casts was she making(distance) ? and what would guess her average distance was from you, on a regular basis?

Sorry, Tim, I just saw your question. Gretta was casting out pretty consistently to 90 yards but her "working" range would shorten up to about  50-55 yards. She's not a huge ranging dog, but will range out when the cover allows for it. In the case of those 2 days, the cover was still reasonably thick. By contrast, when I condition her at the Setter Club in Medford, where she is working edges and hedgerows, she casts 150+, and will average about 110 from me. Her average speed there is also higher - usually in the 8+ range, especially if we are running for just a few hours there. Some other reasons I suspect for the increased range isn't just the cover (though that's a lot of it) - she knows the Setter Club grounds really well, and is very familiar with working those objectives where there are usually quail hanging around.

Hope this helps you. I love the Astro for this type of data. I also use it to judge how "in shape" the dogs are by running a course at the club, and comparing that day's performance to the baseline data I keep. As their fitness increases, I can see the data getting better.

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Kansas Big Dog
Per hour, I'd say chin high Kansas CRP is toughest on dogs.

Roy,

I have not hunted the rough Chukar lands, but I agree with you about some of the KS CRP.  Last year one of my best NE KS quail hunting spots had the CRP burned off.  With the more than average rain last year, the grass was 7 foot tall.  The birds were there, but after a couple of hours, we were spent.  I tried twice, but both times the grass won.

KBD

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