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bosco mctavitch

Patterning for stock fit

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ScottGrush

Great advice and sound reasoning I suppose. The cast makes sense but I am not sure I can wrap my mind around the drop rationale.

I too will have to think on it.

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bosco mctavitch
If you care enough to try and wrap your head around it, then try it yourself--I guarantee you'll learn something about your shooting and you might even shoot better as a result!  I dont know exactly how fine the adjustment shims on your benelli are, but that gives you a very easy way to go through this and see for yourself what works best for you. There is absolutely no better way to fully understand this stuff than to experiment and draw your own conclusions.

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Tim Frazier

I can't count how many times I've seen someone in a goose pit or in the grouse woods with a gun with way too much LOP because that's what they shoot clays with, and watched them turn in a poor performance.

1/8" less comb and 1/4" less LOP can make a world of difference.

As well those nice soft recoil pads...but hey, it's just more game for me to shoot at.

JMHO

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ScottGrush
If you care enough to try and wrap your head around it, then try it yourself--I guarantee you'll learn something about your shooting and you might even shoot better as a result!  I dont know exactly how fine the adjustment shims on your benelli are, but that gives you a very easy way to go through this and see for yourself what works best for you. There is absolutely no better way to fully understand this stuff than to experiment and draw your own conclusions.

I have been adding height to my combs because I like to float birds above the gun as I shoot. I also notice when I kill birds not so dead that they have badly shot up legs/feet and tailfans. I figured my misses must be low but now you have me thinking.

I know this past Sunday I had an epic day of misses and upon review all I could think of was I was peaking all day. Lifting my head. I must have been missing them high eh?

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bosco mctavitch

Hard tellin from 1000 miles away, but maybe.  I'm a methodical guy so I try to approach these things as objectively as I can--I'd try the pattern-board excercise, and see what happens...I dont like guessing and experimenting, I like to get some data and act on that, and then get more data to gauge if it accomplished what I wanted--keeps the guesswork to a minimum and gives me more confidence in the process.  

If you dont want to do it yourself I know you can get a good shooting lesson/fitting in your neck of the woods, I really, really believe that is money well spent.  Plus, with your season almost over, you have 9 months to practice and get tuned up for next year if you need to groove-in some new habits or get some work done.  No better time than right now!!

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PartridgeCartridge

I can tell you this. In many ways Scott Grush is one of those very rare birds like an albino grouse.

He doesn't shoot much but is an excellent grouseshot. I've seen it firsthand.

But he is the exception to the rule and many that think they are a great gameshot are actually very inconsistent, and in many cases, poor shots overall.

But that friggin' Grush is a stone cold killer. Hammer too.

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ScottGrush
But that friggin' Grush is a stone cold killer. Hammer too.

From your lips to my ears before I become a headcase.  :D

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Tim Frazier
But that friggin' Grush is a stone cold killer. Hammer too.

From your lips to my ears before I become a headcase.  :D

You guys need to get a room...

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Hunshatt
But that friggin' Grush is a stone cold killer. Hammer too.

From your lips to my ears before I become a headcase.  :D

You guys need to get a room...

no chit....

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Bonasa

I can't count how many times I've seen someone in a goose pit or in the grouse woods with a gun with way too much LOP because that's what they shoot clays with, and watched them turn in a poor performance.

1/8" less comb and 1/4" less LOP can make a world of difference.

As well those nice soft recoil pads...but hey, it's just more game for me to shoot at.

JMHO

Very good point in my experience.  I've had many fittings/lessons with Bryan Bilinski over the past 15 years.  Great instructor, but he was always trying to get me to shoot more LOP (wanted me at 15 3/8").  I have found that for grouse hunting I am far more effective when shooting a shorter (15") LOP and a little more drop. Clay shooting is just different than hunting grouse where speed getting to a consistent mount is important.

Edit:  just went to page (1) and saw this was discussed in later posts.  Interesting that some of us have reached a similar conclusion on this issue (different fit for hunting).

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wkburns
I've had many fittings/lessons with Bryan Bilinski over the past 15 years.  Great instructor, but he was always trying to get me to shoot more LOP (wanted me at 15 3/8").  I have found that for grouse hunting I am far more effective when shooting a shorter (15") LOP and a little more drop. Clay shooting is just different than hunting grouse where speed getting to a consistent mount is important.

Edit:  just went to page (1) and saw this was discussed in later posts.  Interesting that some of us have reached a similar conclusion on this issue (different fit for hunting).

That's what I don't like about many fitters. They try and set you up for the clay course and ignore the field. The best fitting I ever had was by Jon Hollinger of Aspen Outfitters. First thing he asked me was what I was going to use the gun for, hunting or clays? Also what temps I typically hunt in as my clothing would change my length of pull at different times of the year.

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bosco mctavitch

It's funny, i'd actually like to learn more about fitting target guns.  There is so much that is being taken into account by good fitters who specialise in that, including fit that fosters a head-up position for better target aquisition and maintaining focus, long-term recoil reduction, etc, and they are working without the constraints of "classic" lines so there are some really interesting ideas and approaches I've seen--look at the very high-combed/high-ribbed sporting guns with rollover stocks and whatnot.  They are ghastly from a classic aesthetic, but the concepts very much apply to hutning guns.  I think it's interesting from an academic standpoint and becasue I enjoy shooting clays, but some of it can also be transferred to a large degree to classic stocks...they are clearly different, but it's all interesting stuff to me and I'd hate to concentrate on only one element of it.

aim.jpg

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Bonasa

aim.jpg

This picture cracks me up.  It's like he said to himself:  "I told the manufacturer to build this gun with a high rib!!  Didn't they friggin understand?"  so he adds the cheater rib on top... :D

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bosco mctavitch
I just love that it's a SIDELOCK SxS! :D

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Jake

As a student of gun fit for several years I found your article was chock full of great info and advice. The standard sloping comb and amount of clothing will change the drop at face and therefore the point of impact.  Most shooters would in IMO benefit from a parallel comb thereby creating a consistent drop at face no matter how much clothing. However manufacturers would be hard pressed to suit the multitude of buyers.

Also for measuring cast, with the gun mounted as you suggest in a vise, tape the string to the front bead and then draw it to the butt while holding a string attached to a plumb bob so you can mark where the rib aligned with the butt. It's a tricky manoeuvre but not impossible to achieve lol.

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