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      WELCOME NEW UJ MEMBERS   06/25/2017

      It seems the word is out and UJ is enjoying a steady stream of newly Registered Members. Welcome to all of you, and we are all looking forward to your positive participation. I strongly suggest you review the Board Guidelines that have been in place since 2002. The most significant thing being that UJ is a NO POLITICS BOARD. LInk:  UJ BOARD GUIDELINES   Also UJ stays afloat mainly through Member Donations. Once a Donation is made you are placed in the Contributing Member Group with extra Priviliges. I am getting very few new Donations so hopefully this will spur that on a bit. Link:  New Members/Donations/Priviliges
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Brad Eden

Releasing dogs from body grip traps

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shoot-straight

will be packing zip ties this year for sure!

had a bad encounter with a 220 with my previous lab. luckily his head was too big for it. it collapsed on his muzzle. one of the worst moments in my life. i was able to use my hand to squeeze the spring enough to release him. NY has now made the traditional bucket set illegal, they have to be elavated ad/or a teeny opening that a dog cant get into.

330- i think they are a death sentance. they are "supposed" to be set below the water surface. that provides me little comfort when hunting in or near water.

one note to everyone. many times trappers mark their sets with some ribbon. if you see ribbon, walk the other way or keep your eyes peeled at a minimum.

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braque du upstate
I trap some years,  without hands on knowledge you're fubar 'd IMO.  The initial trap strike isn't particularly powerful. I've caught my hand without damage. The trap is supposed to suffocate raccoon sized animals(220) . 330 's are bad medicine. I can open 220' s without tools.  I'm 5 8"  165.  Conibear traps are not very intuitive, you need to practice once or twice. One thing to remember is that the trap will most likely be anchored with some type of wire or chain.  Carrying a pair of pliers that can cut coat hanger sized wire isn't a bad idea.  Some traps will be anchored with ground anchors.  Ground anchors can handle about 800 lbs of force. You'll need to cut them or dig them out.  I ' d stay positive if a dog gets caught.  Even 330 's can fail to connect. Trap springs quickly lose power in the woods.   I have released opossum alive and well after being caught in 220.   Most bird dogs' anatomy gives them a fighting chance.

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WindyHills

Great to see a discussion of what to do in the event of a conibear trapped dog, but the discussion inevitably leads to some suggestion that a dog can easily be take out alive.  

Unfortunately there are a number if big "IF's" that need to be present in order to do so.  You have a chance:

IF the dog isn't fully into the trap (i.e it is around the neck); and

IF you get to the dog in time (the trap is quickly lethal--the trap was developed due to pressures to end use of standard traps due to injury concerns--the standard under which the conibear was developed calls for death within a few minutes);

IF you know how the trap jaw pressure can be released;

IF you don't panic;

IF your dog is not so agitated that it is hard to get it to sit still enough for you to open the trap; and

IF your dog is not BITING YOU while you are trying to get the trap open....

Then you have a chance.  

As I mention multiple times each year, there are many cases of trappers--people who use conibears themselves--losing their own dogs in conibears.  I know of a couple that didn't find their dog in time and another that was badly bitten in the act of trying to free it.  Two of them had the dog die while they watched.

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braque du upstate
I totally agree it may go badly . The trap isn't magical. In reality, it's very good at killing 10 lb animals. A deep neck catch would be my preference.

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Bigskytaku
Don't forget about snares either. Since they are designed to lock tighter and tighter around the neck, it is very difficult to back off the lock. Best way is to carry cutters that can handle 3/32" or larger cable. Every year in MT, dogs are caught in these type of sets.

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shinbone
Anyone know of a video showing how to use a zip tie to open a conibear?

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Pomoxis
Anyone know of a video showing how to use a zip tie to open a conibear?

Ahhh. Brad's first post...

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shinbone

Anyone know of a video showing how to use a zip tie to open a conibear?

Ahhh. Brad's first post...

I didn't see mention of a video showing a how to use a zip tie to open a conibear.  Maybe I am looking in the wrong place?  The text indicated the zip tie is used in place of a rope.  I am still not convinced a zip tie would be all that helpful in opening a 330, unless you laced it through the springs' eyes multiple times, which sounds like it would take a long time . . .

Before deciding to rely on a zip tie, I'd be sure to try it a few times just to be sure it will indeed work.

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settem
It's about 2:30 on the video Brad posted.

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shinbone
Okay.  Found it.  Thanks.  The zip tie method does look good.  I am going to buy some big zip ties and practice on my 330.

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Tiger MT's Carter
My setters are big running setters and are always out 600 to 1000 yards, not sure I would have time to help them if they got hung up. I will add some zip ties to my vest this year in the event that this would happen. I have no problem with trappers but I have a hard time with the conibear traps, never seen one set in Nevada.

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braque du upstate
My setters are big running setters and are always out 600 to 1000 yards, not sure I would have time to help them if they got hung up. I will add some zip ties to my vest this year in the event that this would happen. I have no problem with trappers but I have a hard time with the conibear traps, never seen one set in Nevada.

It's not really practical for out west. Bucket sets are almost always used to target raccoon. 330  are beaver traps. Experienced trappers go out of the way to avoid connflict. Most problems occur with rookies or disgruntled veterans. Unfortunately, dogs are sometimes targeted.  For the price of a single connibear trap. A guy can put out 20 snares. Nevada has $ 500 cats running around. A guy can deploy $ 1 snares Willy nilly  and create a cluster in a hurry.

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Roger Brown

We got to try the cable ties tonight on a 220.  They were rated for 175 lbs. and 36 inches long, purchased at Lowes.  They worked great!  I recommend you buy some and carry them with you just in case!  I hope this helps.

Roger Brown

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Sten
Is it possible to get enough leverage with zip ties on a larger conibear trap like a 330?

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jeff4mc
If I found my dog in this situation while hunting and without the tools or knowledge of how to quickly release the trap, I believe I would shoot the trap, essentially cutting the frame with the shot.  Obviously a thrashing dog would make this very difficult.  Very soon though the dog will be "calming" down.  Proper point-blank muzzle placement should release the dog from the trap and doggy CPR (no, i'm not kidding) could be started almost immediately if pup is unconscious.  Thoughts?

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