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      WELCOME NEW UJ MEMBERS   06/25/2017

      It seems the word is out and UJ is enjoying a steady stream of newly Registered Members. Welcome to all of you, and we are all looking forward to your positive participation. I strongly suggest you review the Board Guidelines that have been in place since 2002. The most significant thing being that UJ is a NO POLITICS BOARD. LInk:  UJ BOARD GUIDELINES   Also UJ stays afloat mainly through Member Donations. Once a Donation is made you are placed in the Contributing Member Group with extra Priviliges. I am getting very few new Donations so hopefully this will spur that on a bit. Link:  New Members/Donations/Priviliges
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Brad Eden

Releasing dogs from body grip traps

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David.Marra
Thomas & Betts makes a tie called the Del-Tec that is rated at 250lbs.

http://www.tnb.com/ps/fulltilt/index.cgi?part=TYD5270M

A hunter should be able to carry a couple of ties in the game bag.

I found one set in the UP last year that looked like it had been left there for a long time, basically abandoned, and just waiting to kill someone's dog.

I am pro trapping, but there is no valid argument for setting these things on dry ground, it's just wrong.

Where was the trap you saw?

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dstreet

Here in Louisiana, body grip or conibear traps can be set on the ground, in bucket sets, blind sets, any way you please.  Deer stops are not required on snares here either.  Trapping is not as popular here as it is up north, so we do not run into too many traps.  In fact, the entire season last year, I met one fellow running snares.  (I went to another part of the WMA to hunt my dog though.)  

I am familiar with conibear traps and know how to open them.  220s are not too much trouble.  330s are very tough to pry open, even with a tool.  Add a thrashing dog and the process becomes more difficult still.  My dad and I use conibears in bucket sets for predator control on our private land (this is a very effective method to catch raccoons), however, we do so after the quail season is over (so no dogs are running).  

I mentioned this before on another thread months ago, but the trapping community is being pushed to phase out leg holds.  This means we will see more and more snares and killer traps.

I believe trapping is a very important part of wildlife management.  I also believe that trappers have as much right to use public land to trap as I do to run my bird dogs.  Surely, there is some middle ground that we all could share.  I hope so.  I am sad to see trappers and bird hunters at odds with one another.

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Tim Frazier
If I found my dog in this situation while hunting and without the tools or knowledge of how to quickly release the trap, I believe I would shoot the trap, essentially cutting the frame with the shot.  Obviously a thrashing dog would make this very difficult.  Very soon though the dog will be "calming" down.  Proper point-blank muzzle placement should release the dog from the trap and doggy CPR (no, i'm not kidding) could be started almost immediately if pup is unconscious.  Thoughts?

This would not work.  The hardened spring steel would not be "cut" by lead shot.  As well deflected pellets would probably finish off your dog.

Before you let your dog die take your shoe laces off and use the rope method.

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RalphBeagle
I carry something like Oriongs suggested.  For about $25 I bought a collapsible bolt cutter  from Menards.  They fold to about a foot but open up to about 20" or so in about 2 seconds.  They will go through conibear trap 'jaws' with moderate force very quickly.  Two snips and the dog should be free.  I did not try cutting the spring steel but my understanding is that the springs would be much more difficult -- and a little more time consuming -- to cut.  The only drawback is that the boltcutters weigh more than zip ties, rope or the chain and hook trap openers (all of which I also have).  But the boltcutters ride in my game pouch now.

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Iver
Thomas & Betts makes a tie called the Del-Tec that is rated at 250lbs.

http://www.tnb.com/ps/fulltilt/index.cgi?part=TYD5270M

A hunter should be able to carry a couple of ties in the game bag.

I found one set in the UP last year that looked like it had been left there for a long time, basically abandoned, and just waiting to kill someone's dog.

I am pro trapping, but there is no valid argument for setting these things on dry ground, it's just wrong.

FYI ...I bought a dozen 175lb ties for 10 bucks at Princess auto last weekend.

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david0311
Seems like a good time to post this. Ill try and keep track of it and Pin it later. (A UJer emailed me this link)

Info/video on releasing dogs from body grip traps

After seeing and experimenting with various methods I believe I have come across the best method I've ever seen for this horrible situation!!!

Met the man who came up with this at trappers convention--watched him demonstrate and then used my self on both 220's and 330's--

Nothing I have seen works better and this easy

Will never be in the field again without--

I have no fiscal interest in this produce-- bought at regular price

Would suggest checking out video at--

Ron's  Tel-715-347-7311  

www.youtube (Trapper Ron's Setter Dog release)

Let me know what you think--d.c.

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Remo

Excerpts from a good article concerning snaring. Thought it could be added here on UJ.

 

For the most part, El Nino has brought above normal temperatures and conditions to North Dakota this fall, allowing for extended upland bird hunting opportunities. Many trappers began building their traplines through November, and with the close of the deer gun season, will begin targeting coyotes with cable devices (e.g. snares).

Public lands such as WPA's and WMA's do not allow the use of cable devices until after the close of the upland bird season. The ability to use cable devices on private lands began November 21, 2016. Using cable devices on private lands requires written permission from the landowner or operator, and that includes PLOTS lands. Visiting with the landowner or operator is crucial to knowing who else has permission and what activities may occur on that land.

The intent of this information is to raise the level of awareness and reduce the potential for any unnecessary problem. No trapper that I know of makes a set to catch someone's dog, but it can happen if circumstances permit. Knowledge of each others activities, communicating with landowners or operators, and being prepared are key to having a safe, productive, and enjoyable day afield.

We have information brochures for safely releasing dogs, can provide needed training to dog owners, and are available to assist wherever needed – all anyone has to do is ask. The link to the three brochures is “www.gf.nd.gov/hunting/trapping-and-dogs(link is external)”.

If you would like to know more about using cable devices in North Dakota, the link to the handbook is “www.gf.nd.gov/sites/default/files/publications/using-cable-devices-in-nd.pdf(link is external)”.

Galvanized aircraft cable is commonly used in the construction of cable devices for coyotes. Some wire cutters or leatherman tools may eventually cut this cable, but it will be very difficult and time consuming. Cable cutters are used to easily cut through this type of cable. They are inexpensive and small enough to carry in a hunting vest or jacket pocket. Two links to this product are:

www.minntrapprod.com/Cable-Cutter-and-Sheath-Save-200/productinfo/C7-COMBO(link is external)

www.snareshop.com/prodinfo.asp?number=RC8(link is external)

If you have any trouble with acquiring the publications or a pair of cable cutters; need hard copies of any printed material; have related questions; or would like to set up a future training opportunity; send a PM or contact me via e-mail through our website at “www.ndfhta.com(link is external)”. Please share this information with those who you think may benefit by it, and have many safe and enjoyable days experiencing all that North Dakota has to offer.

 

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UplandGuide

Came across this informative video on releasing your pup from traps:

 

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