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MikeH.

Y Tex Python ear tags for bugs

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MikeH.

Last year I did some reading and I talked with some folks about using Y Tex Python (purple) cattle insecticide ear tags on our dogs to deter mosquitos, fleas and ticks. I read some who thought they were good for mosquitos and fleas but doubted the effectiveness with ticks. I read some who said this worked for ticks also.

I started using them last summer, later in the summer. It seemed to work very well for all three.

I read to cut the tag into four pieces and tie one piece on each dog. I used small zip ties to wrap the tag around the collar and keep it there.

There are cautions about not doing this with lactating females and not letting one dog chew it off another dog.

All of the above can be found by searching for 'using cattle tags on dogs as mosquito (flea or tick) prevention.' I found most the discussion was among hound and beagle guys.

I had told my son about this and he wanted a few to take on his recent trip to Africa (he is a pastor). He wore a full tag on two of his packs. He said he had at least one bag with him all the time.(He kept certain documents, medications, etc. in the pack.)

He also used the lotion, and the netting at night, that everyone else used. Everyone else had many bites during the trip. He had only two bites the entire 10 days they were there. He said it got to where people wanted to be close to him and his pack where ever they went.

The tags contain permethrin which is the same chemical in most of the drops or injectables used for insects, Advantix, Frontline, etc.

The advantage. No visit to the Vet. And a package of 12 (I think that is right) is 25-30 dollars. Using 1/4 at a time, and the fact that they last 2-3 months, some say longer, one package can protect a dog for years, or a few dogs for a few years. No matter what the math, it is way less expensive.

I could not find the Python one at the local Farm and Fleet and other such places so I ordered a package on the web.

I put a new one on my Lab a week or two ago. He had not had one on during the winter months. I live in Iowa, it was cold. I will be looking for bugs this season, and will report as the season goes on.

Your mileage may vary.

Mike

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SLR

Many dog people use these attached to the inside of the collar. I am going to give it a try first with my setter Kooper. He is a tick magnet. He has the habit of rolling around on the ground and I take as many ticks off of him as our other 4 dogs combined. The risk of disease from ticks is high, so aggressive measures to prevent tick bites are warranted. Public TV interviewed a Lyme disease specialist in the Albany NY area this week. The spot pointed out that 92% of the mice in the Hudson Valley NY are infected with Lyme Borrelia. And then there are the other tick borne diseases. I spray my outdoor clothes with permethrin.

Here's to the predators that keep the mouse and deer populations down. :)

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CdnWingShooter
This is interesting.  Any pics you can share highlighting how the tag is attached?  Does it irritate the dog any? How long does it need to be on to be effective? Have you noticed any effect on the dog's scenting ability?

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Lyco Setter

Wait.... On the collars?

ear-tag-joke.jpg

Just kidding.

tags_zps23fdeaf8.jpg

This is something I've been doing on mine for a few years now. It works great for 2.5-3 months as sort of an everyday maintenance type thing, in the first month- very well on ticks while in the woods. I still mist dogs down every time I put a bell on one with Gordon's (there's a mix ratio in the instructions for soaking dogs with it, and I also spray on my chaps) for extra protection and got out of swapping tags every month but again, the cattle tags do well on their own for the first month or so, if you change it every month though you'll be almost foolproof-fine.

In my experience (trial and error & experiments), this works well:

Buy a box of these -Python Y-Tex

Buy a box of these -Aluminum Chicago Screws (not at that price though!)

Now cut the tail off ear tag... go out and zip-tie it up out of the dogs' reach in the kennel (no bother throwing it out). Cut the length of the remaining tag in half... now you've got tags for two collars. (something that isn't reflected in my photo above.) Since there's now less surface area (less active ingredient) this puts their maximum effectiveness to about the previously mentioned month's time.

I use Lion Country Supply's (UJ sponsor) Day-Glo collars (1" d-ring). Since I take advantage of their $1.50 riveted brass tags, I get a hot soldering iron and burn two holes between the brass plate and the d-ring (and through the tag itself) as I also use these same collars to run bells on and some bells don't slide over the tag/alum-screw/collar thickness and if attached between the brass plate and the adjustment holes, it's too tight to the buckle and d-ring and you can't get the collar attached and through the buckle. (Learned that the hard way- in photo above.)

I put mine on the inside of the collar, others have also put theirs on the outside. I haven't noticed a difference in effectiveness either way. I've had an old timer at a field trial come up and flat out tell me they don't work... What he and others need to realize/remember is these tags do not create an invisible forcefield around your dog, you'll still see ticks on them from time to time in the field and again, in my experiences, these are the ones that haven't yet "abandoned ship". Honestly I can't remember the last time I've pulled an embedded tick off a dog and we get into them A LOT.

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Mike Connally
If they do the job in central PA thats quite an endorsement.

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UglyD

Ticks are not so bad here in the inter mountain west as in the east- but I have been usuing the tags for 3 years now . I have them on little clips that can be taken off because not only are they on the dog collars - I have D rings on the the last eye let of my hunting boots that they attach to also.

Haven't had any ticks on the dogs nor myself.

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MikeH.

Lyco,

So you find the best results if you change them out every month?

I attach mine a little different. I cut the tag off and keep it in the dog kennel. I then take the square that remains and cut it into four somewhat equal squares.

I attach them to a flat collar like you described by simply wrapping the square around the collar. I take to small zip ties and put four little slits in the tag. I sort of just weave the zips through the holes and around the collar with the zips on the our side, for the most part, away from the dog. Pull the zips tight to the collar and cut off the excess.

Because it is tight to the collar I don't see any wear to the tag.

It does not irritate the dogs skin or anything like that as far as I can tell.

No ticks so far this season. It has just started to get warmer, like days pretty consistent over 60 degrees. So we will see.

Mike

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Luminary Setters
The owner of the farm supply store that I buy my feed from tells me the manufactureres of the python tags also make a tag specifically for dogs. It is chemically the same as the cattle tag, smaller, and retails for $19.95.

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UglyD
How many for $19,95- for $35 I purchased enough for the entire town of the cattle tags. I'll have to look into that .

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UglyD
Could only find a power (dusting) and a concentrate for a spray listed on thier web site for dogs.

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Luminary Setters

I didn't ask specifics on the tag.  I asked about the cattle tags use on dogs when he spoke of the dog tag.  I suspect it is marketed under a botique name.  He said a single tag sells for $19.95. He elected not to carry them.  He also said the beagle trialers buy a lot of the purple python tags.

When I pick up feed next month I'll get the specifics on the dog tag and post it.

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cockerfan
I really like the idea of using the tags, and am considering giving them a try. My only concern is,  are they safe to use on indoor dogs and/or dogs that kids will be frequently exposed to?

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caleb

I really like the idea of using the tags, and am considering giving them a try. My only concern is,  are they safe to use on indoor dogs and/or dogs that kids will be frequently exposed to?

That's my concern with all these anti-tick pesticides.

Even if they're safe on a dog with a life expectancy of 10-ish years, that doesn't necessarily mean they're safe for daily human exposure over 50, 60, or 70 years.

I have no knowledge that would lead me to think they're necessarily unsafe, it's just that I haven't seen evidence of their safety.  This goes for the topicals too, not just the ear tags.

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UplandKS

I really like the idea of using the tags, and am considering giving them a try. My only concern is,  are they safe to use on indoor dogs and/or dogs that kids will be frequently exposed to?

That's my concern with all these anti-tick pesticides.

Even if they're safe on a dog with a life expectancy of 10-ish years, that doesn't necessarily mean they're safe for daily human exposure over 50, 60, or 70 years.

I have no knowledge that would lead me to think they're necessarily unsafe, it's just that I haven't seen evidence of their safety.  This goes for the topicals too, not just the ear tags.

I was just getting ready to ask that question, as well.

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Chris Raymond
I too get queasy about insect meds.  Undoubtedly I'm thinking of this incorrectly, but I still seem to recall one class or another in the military that communicated that all insecticides were a form of one nerve agent or another.

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