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Tim Frazier

Best Retirement Jobs

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Tim Frazier
Chris's post got me to thinking.  The next 8 years will go fast, if the last 50 are any indication, and I know I'll want to putz around doing something for spending money.  So while I have time to plan, it would be interesting to know what others have done.

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topdog1961
My underground pet fence business will be my semi-retirement job. I've had the business 12 years now in addition to a full time job and I still enjoy it. I think I will even more so after the time pressure of the day job is removed. I think if you want or need a part time job in retirement it is ideal, at least for me. I get to meet interesting people who also love dogs and better yet I get to meet and train lots of great dogs. I work outdoors with power equipment and did I mention I get to work with dogs and make their lives better. I will be able to work more or less my own schedule and the business is slow to non existent during the really cold months that I would not want to work outside. The return on time expended is pretty good and did I mention I get to work with dogs?

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rideold
That's a great question.  I'm looking at another 10 before I can pull a benefit.  I'll have kids in college at that point so my thought was to take my retirement and then work part time at something to make ends meet.  The great thing for me is that I'm eligible September 1st (2025) so it only seems logical to take the fall off to hunt before going back to work after the holidays.  I've thought about consulting in my current industry (GIS) but it would be nice to do something completely different.  I have a friend in the specialty coffee industry so that has been on my mind.  I talked to a guy a while back that has a window washing business.  He only does single story commercial building and works 9 months a year and spends the other three in Mexico.  That wouldn't be a bad gig once you have the client list built.

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Greg Hartman

Well, this obviously won't work for everyone, but I've got the ideal retirement job for my situation.  

Basically, I'm just doing what I've always done (business/tax/M&A law), but now I only take on projects that I like doing and only for people that I like; and I'm no longer involved (except in an advisory capacity) in managing the firm, which was the thing I found by far the most stressful when working full time.  I go in to the office usually one morning per week to meet with people and handle the few things I can't handle from home - I still have an office, secretary, etc, there.  I do almost all of my work - drafting documents, negotiating, etc, from my home office/gun room, where I have my dogs at my feet and I can watch the deer and other critters out in my woods.  This allows me to do my primary duty these days of caring for my extremely ill and handicapped wife.

I basically enjoyed my work when working full time and would have never retired but for the fact that I had enough money saved for a comfortable retirement and I wanted the time and freedom to spend six months/year in my motorhome traveling and hunting.  Unfortunately, my wife had a catastrophic stroke just as I retired to travel and hunt, so that hasn't happened.  Since I spend so much time stuck in the house for caregiving anyway, why not keep mentally busy?  Also, earning a little from post-retirement work has meant I've been able to just let my retirement investments grow without needing to touch them after three+ years of retirement so far.

When thinking about post-retirement jobs, be careful you don't ruin a perfectly good hobby by turning it into work.

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erik meade
...

When thinking about post-retirement jobs, be careful you don't ruin a perfectly good hobby by turning it into work.

That sounds like good advice.

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Don Steese
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When thinking about post-retirement jobs, be careful you don't ruin a perfectly good hobby by turning it into work.

That sounds like good advice.

Very good!

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mshowman

Tim, I'll let you know as soon as I figure it out. This morning during a project planning meeting it occurred to me that my boss couldn't assign new projects for this summer without some idea of my retirement plans. After the meeting I stopped by his office and gave him a tentative (although not official) date. That's the closest I've come to actually committing and it felt pretty good.

I'll be retiring two years before my wife and will use much of the bad weather days adding two rooms, an exercise room and a media room, to our house. During nicer days I'll be converting my overgrown woods into a more park-like setting with the intention of raising the value before putting it up for sale. Once those are finished I'll probably take on some small home repair type projects for others. I've been a desk jockey for nearly 30 years now and look forward to having tools back in my hands again.

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Chris Raymond
Greg's comment about ruining a perfectly good hobby is well worth considering.  I've often thought that running a little bait shop (not tackle) in retirement would be fun but then I would probably kiss any fishing I wanted to do away given the hours if done right.

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Tiger MT's Carter
I told my employer of 25 years that I was planning to retire in the next few years. That was a big mistake; they did everything they could to make me miserable from that point on. I ended up leaving 18 months earlier than what I had planned.

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ShortTailGuy
I retired from Beretta and we bought a 5600 SF Victorian House in Sheffield PA.  Right down the street there was a small hardware store for sale a short 10 minute walk from the house so we bought that too.  I am open from tues. to sat and closed on sun and mon.  I go home to Maryland on Saturday afternoon and come back on Monday afternoon except when she comes up.  We are renovating the house and figure we will be totally done in 5 yrs. or so and then she will retire and move up full time and sell the house in Maryland.  We have a trout streams galore within 15 minutes of the house and grouse , woodcock in the ANF.  I figure that I am 58 and will run the store till around 65 and then find someone to buy it or run it for me.  I don't think that I could just completely stop working all together.  I get in trouble real fast if I have nothing to keep me busy.

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FlyChamps

I, like Greg, just keep on keeping on.

I'm a CPA and on Friday will complete my 39th year in the profession - on to number 40 and (hopefully) many more.

I've run my own firm for 29 of those years and downsized several years ago to just myself.  Management of my "firm" is now easy since I'm the only cat to be herded.  I don't work as many hours as when I was younger but I still have an active practice and am at the top of my game both in ability and income.  Working keeps me out of my wife's hair enough for us to be happy but I can also take off enough time to do most everything that we wish to.  I can't imagine being "retired" until I physically slow down and at 66 I'm nowhere near that.  I'm still shooting, hunting, fly fishing, flying a Cessna 172 and traveling - though I must confess that I did stop sky diving at 57 and scuba diving at 60 but not because of any physical limitation.

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Firelight
Seems that there are increasing opportunities to work from home in a variety of fields, especially part-time.  I am a psychologist and retired 3 years ago, yet wanted some type of work for pocket money.  I wanted a flexible schedule and won't work during hunting season.  I landed some online work with the largest educational testing company in the US which taps into my training in that area (GREs, Praxis, etc.)  I work just a few weeks/year using our home computer.  I like being home, no commute, and last summer I even set up the whelping box and our litter in the office with me which made it fun.

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fuess

As a financial adviser, i see this all the time, and deal with it all the time.

The difference i see, having to work or wanting to work!

Financial independence is met when your unearned income meets or exceeds your earned income, then you work because you want to, not because you have to!

SO save enough so you have the choice, then it will not matter!  You may try something you never imagined!

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erik meade
.... flying a Cessna 172...

Say what?  

Shouldn't someone that goes by FlyChamps pilot an Aeronca?

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Brad Eden
Wal Mart greeter?

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