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Dogwood

Best Used Pickups?

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topdog1961
they are all junk buy one from some place in the south, anything but rust can be fixed with parts

Thanks I've scanned them a bit on Autotrader and there seems to be far fewer 4x4's in the south and SW

This is true. I had the same plan when looking to replace my rusting 91 Toyota 4x4. Everything in my price range <$10,000 local (NW Ohio) was a rust bucket so I looked south. It took me 3 years to find a clean rust free one owner 98 F-150 from southern KY. It was a sweet truck for three years until a GEM module went out this winter and it took me 6 weeks to find the part which is no longer in production. Knock on wood it's  back on the road and going strong. But I was constrained by my low budget. My nephew is a craigslist maestro and seems to have no problem picking up clean southern trucks in your price range. The key is he's looking daily and willing to move instantly. Most people aren't that committed, but he enjoys it.

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salmontogue
I hear they tow well but I would avoid Chrysler pickups.  When I look around the road they seem to be the first to rust out, especially over the wheel wells. A hunting buddy found that out the hard way. That will be an issue in MI. Plus my experience with Chrysler vans and jeeps has been solid power train but lots of nagging little issues. Unless its recent, Chrysler is yet to figure out a dependable power window.

I am surprised about your experience with Dodge Rams.  I have three.  A 2016 1500 Ecodiesel, a 2014 3500 Cummins and a 1997 2500 Cummins.

The 1997 will be twenty years old in October.  It is just beginning to show tiny areas of rust on sheet metal but the frame is immaculate.  Other than routine maintenance, tires, exhaust, brakes, shocks and batteries, it has required one set of wheel bearings, the 4WD actuator lines, one set of brake lines, two front drive hubs and a crankshaft sensor.  That is the sum total and less than $1500 for a pickup closing in on twenty years and 350k miles.  It has towed a 36 foot enclosed car trailer, a four horse trailer,  a 32 foot boat, a 5 series John Deere Ag tractor on a flatbed and a Cat loader/backhoe on a flatbed as well as a variety of smaller trailers.

My personal challenge is to get to a half million miles.  I drive it every day instead of the new ones.  It has never failed to start and it has never, knock on wood, had a breakdown.

The newer ones have also operated flawlessly.  I know nothing from personal experience about any of the gas trucks, my last was a 1982 Ford F250 which had a ton of problems.  More recently, I had a Toyota Tundra which was a total disaster.  That truck needed repeated transmission changes.

Perk

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Chukarman
I buy Ford trucks. As Craig said, if you are going to haul horses or pull a 20 ft boat, get a 3/4 ton truck. I have a F350 CC Ford diesel 4X4 for towing. Love it.

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Flush

In these parts 3/4 ton trucks with gas engines are a relative bargain because most people looking for a 3/4 ton truck want diesel.

Rust isn't really a problem here so for trucks of that vintage, I don't really know how one brand compares to another.

Rust issues aside my experience is that Toyota is the most reliable brand, not to say the American trucks are bad (I drive two Ford trucks) but if reliability is the highest priority it is hard to beat Toyota.

You can certainly tow a couple horses with a 1/2 ton, and I know the newer 1/2 tons are more capable, but almost everyone I know who has ever towed horses with a 1/2 ton is much happier when they go to a 3/4 ton, myself included.

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Dogwood
Is a 3/4 ton better because of shear power or are there other factors?

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Flush
Is a 3/4 ton better because of shear power or are there other factors?

Actually no it's not just about the power, although that can be a factor. Many of the newer 1/2 tons have a lot of power.

It's the brakes, suspension, sometimes gearing, and just the additional weight of the truck (not getting jerked around).

The ratings the manufacturers use really don't tell the whole story. On paper a 1/2 ton may be fairly close to a 3/4 ton in max trailer tow weights, but in my experience HOW they pull, in terms of stability, is a lot different.  

As a side note, and this may not apply to you, but most horse people in this area eventually gravitate to gooseneck trailers, which generally pull MUCH nicer than bumper-pull trailers. Goosenecks put a lot of the trailer weight on the rear truck axle, which is why they pull so nice, but they also often exceed the payload/axle ratings of 1/2 tons.

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25/06

3/4 ton Vs. 1/2 ton

Much bigger everything on the drive train...Power plants aside... from the tires to the transmission everything is heavier built..

You really need to look at both from underneath

The reality of the newer 3/4 ton are is that they are built exactly the same as the single rear wheel 1 tons...They are simply rated lower on the door stickers.

The reason for this lower rating is to allow truck to avoid commercial registration in many states

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Doubleplay
3/4 ton Vs. 1/2 ton

Much bigger everything on the drive train...Power plants aside... from the tires to the transmission everything is heavier built..

You really need to look at both from underneath

The reality of the newer 3/4 ton are is that they are built exactly the same as the single rear wheel 1 tons...They are simply rated lower on the door stickers.

The reason for this lower rating is to allow truck to avoid commercial registration in many states

They are built very similar except the rear suspension. Most 3/4 tons are spring and 1 tons are leaf..

Thus 3/4 tons have a better ride empty.

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salmontogue

Cannot speak to Ford and GM but the Ram 2500 has leaf rears.  There is also a difference in spring stiffness and travel velocity between 3/4 and one ton trucks.  Also a difference between front and rear stabilizer bars, shock absorbers, brake sizing and, sometimes, axles and transfer cases.

Perk

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25/06

I do not ever remember seeing a 3/4 with coil springs in the back?

We are changing out our fleet right now and we have 14 new rams that have air suspension in the rear... All the Ford & GMC that are going away have Leaf spring rear ends in back.

Wish I knew how to post photos. :D

To the original posters question...My 1/2 ton Ford crew cab weighs 5440 lb My 3/4 ton Diesel work truck weighs 9200 and that is all drive train weight.

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Doubleplay

I do not ever remember seeing a 3/4 with coil springs in the back?

We are changing out our fleet right now and we have 14 new rams that have air suspension in the rear... All the Ford & GMC that are going away have Leaf spring rear ends in back.

Wish I knew how to post photos. :D

To the original posters question...My 1/2 ton Ford crew cab weighs 5440 lb My 3/4 ton Diesel work truck weighs 9200 and that is all drive train weight.

Starting from 2014:

There are several notables for the 2014 Ram 2500. Taking cues from the 1500, standard five-link coil rear suspension has been added to the 2500 to deliver best-in-class ride. Compared to a leaf spring system, this rear suspension will provide better articulation over obstacles.

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settem

These "what truck" threads always get entertaining...

The big truck guys swear you can't tow anything bigger than a log splitter with anything less than a 3/4 ton truck.

The Toyota guys swear you can tow anything with a Tacoma?   :D

How much does the boat and the loaded horse trailer weigh?

I've pulled an 18ft bass boat, lots of cars, trucks,  even a farm tractor with a worn out half ton Chevy, and it's not exactly flat country here.  I'm know a diesel ton truck could have done it easier, but I got where I was going, and never felt like I was putting the public in danger.

So to answer your question, I would be looking for a 5.3 Silverado, but I'm a Chevy Truck guy...

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salmontogue
These "what truck" threads always get entertaining...

The big truck guys swear you can't tow anything bigger than a log splitter with anything less than a 3/4 ton truck.

The Toyota guys swear you can tow anything with a Tacoma?   :D

How much does the boat and the loaded horse trailer weigh?

I've pulled an 18ft bass boat, lots of cars, trucks,  even a farm tractor with a worn out half ton Chevy, and it's not exactly flat country here.  I'm know a diesel ton truck could have done it easier, but I got where I was going, and never felt like I was putting the public in danger.

So to answer your question, I would be looking for a 5.3 Silverado, but I'm a Chevy Truck guy...

A four horse trailer with living quarters weighs between 8K and 10K.  Add the horses, tack, feed, equipment along with food, clothing and all the other stuff and you are pushing 14K to 17K, two axle up to 14K and three axle over that.

A John Deere 5 series MFWD with loader, attachments and sound guard cab weighs between 9K and 11K based on configuration.  Add another 2K to 3K for the trailer and you are at 11K to 14K.  

Neither of these loads is suitable for anything less than a one ton.

The weight bearing ability is important but the stopping ability is of ultimate importance.  Diesels are the way to go tourque-wise with acceleration but also because added stopping power is available from the engine brake.

My large center console boat plus two axle trailer and full 105 gallon fuel tank and 30 gallon water tank comes in around 7900 pounds.  A 25 to 28 foot travel trailer with contents would be about the same.  A half ton, properly equipped, will tow this load but a three quarter ton is far preferable, particularly in stop mode.

All trailers in this size and weight range should have brakes on all axles.  I have weighed all my trailers on the scale at a local sand and gravel company.  The Maine State Police have "offered" to weigh me multiple times and were happy with the GCVWR results.

Perk

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