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KerryLuft

So what's stopping you?

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KerryLuft

Seems to be a flurry of interest here on the UJ with registered shooting, what with tournament reports, discussions of target difficulty, instructions, etc.  Glad to see it.

 

But that leads me to ask, how many of you actually are shooting registered targets? I know 25/06 and Kemo Sabe are shooting NSCA events, as am I, and dogrunner shot in hunter's class earlier this summer.

 

For those of you who are interested, what's holding you back? Can we help ease your concerns?

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quailguy

Several years ago I shot registered targets for a year or so. And, I found out that it is not for me. I spent almost 40 years working for Uncle Sugar in various places and I have had enough stress; fun shooting is something else. I was out on one of SC ranges at the National HQ yesterday. I'm trying to be the best game shot I can. That is more fun for me.

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Clueless1

My teenage son and I would like to try but don't have a clue where to begin.  Any websites or such that I can look into to find shoots that we could at least show up to in order to find out what is going on?  I mean, I REALLY don't know what different types are etc.  How to find shoots/clubs in the area?  Think of a 12 year old talking about rocket science here, and give me the absolute beginning stuff I need to know.:D  

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KerryLuft

Totally legitimate and understandable. Glad you're having fun.

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ANF grousin

Re-learning how to shoot again so I dont make a total fool of myself. Maybe next year at some smaller registered shoots.

Clueless, check out places like Buffer Creek and and Stoneycreek close to you. A bit further east is Shenecoy near Huntingdon. Here is a partial list of places to shoot.
http://www.pasportingclays.com/clubs.html



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KerryLuft
4 hours ago, Clueless1 said:

My teenage son and I would like to try but don't have a clue where to begin.  Any websites or such that I can look into to find shoots that we could at least show up to in order to find out what is going on?  I mean, I REALLY don't know what different types are etc.  How to find shoots/clubs in the area?  Think of a 12 year old talking about rocket science here, and give me the absolute beginning stuff I need to know.:D  

Start on mynsca.com, the website of the national sporting clays association.  Or go here http://nsca.nssa-nsca.org/shoot-search/ and look for shoots in the area.  Call the club, which should be listed, and ask for help.  See if they wouldn't mind hooking you up with an experienced shooter to guide you through your first shoot.  After all, it's in the club's best interests to recruit new victims, er, shooters.

 

All you need is a shotgun capable of shooting two shells (O/U and semis most common), eye and ear protection and some target shells (7.5 shot or smaller, no more than 1 1/8 oz. of shot in 12 gauge).  Stuff like vests, pouches and specialized gear can come later.  Go out and shoot a round or two before you try a competition.  Competition rules are best explained in person, but they're pretty straightforward -- don't load until you're in the cage, you get to look at a pair of targets before you try to shoot them, you can shoot with the gun premounted or not, you can only load two shells, etc.  

 

When you join and enter, you will be placed in E class and will stay there until you win or place well in a couple of shoots in that class. From there you progress through D, C, B, A, AA and finally Master Class.  At that point you will have to fend off groupies and other shooters will step aside as you approach the shooting cage -- think Moses and the Red Sea. :-D

 

Well, not really.  If you want to just dip your toe into the water you can shoot tournaments in "Hunter Class," which is designed for people who aren't sure if they like competition.

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Brad Eden

Is there any counseling available for those with public performance anxiety?

 

?

 

 

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KerryLuft
20 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Is there any counseling available for those with public performance anxiety?

 

?

 

 

Good one.

 

(Yes. Practice!!!)

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25/06
38 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Is there any counseling available for those with public performance anxiety?

 

?

 

Funny!... If you go to a little tournament most are open all day and score your own affairs so no one will know you are shooting registered!....

 

A far better way to get involved is as Kerry said go the NSCA website use the state of the art 1990 era software to find a local shoot.... You do not have to register but I highly suggest you do after the first shoot anyway....

Next call the local club hosting the shoot....Tell them you are interested in shooting the tournament but have never done so...

 

One of two things will happen... The owner will Take you around themselves or they will hook you up some experienced shooters who will show you the ropes...Most esperienced shooters jump at the chance to take you along.... Bring the stuff Kerry mentioned above and you will be set!

 

Have Fun...Do not worry about being judged!.. As I have said in previous post most experienced registered shooter could care less if you can hit the sky or not...

 

One thing to remember tho is Safety!... Unlike hunting and hunters safety courses on a sporting clays course no one cares if you use your safety or even if your gun has one... Safety on a sporting clays course means.... Action always open unless in shooting box... No shells in gun unless in box this includes magazine... Only two shells in gun at a time!.... Muzzle discipline is same as hunting..

 

I have met the nicest people on their best behavior on the sporting clays course!

 

 

Quote

 

 

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Ruger1
8 hours ago, KerryLuft said:

 

 

 Can we help ease your concerns?

 

Since you asked -

 

I've been shooting SC since the mid-80s but never shot a registered bird until three years ago when I really had my arm twisted to try it and my pucker factor the first couple of tournaments was thru the roof. These are my observations and experiences not necessarily in the order of importance and mostly aimed at those beginners shooting registered SCs' targets for the first or second time and assuming they find themselves on a  squad with some experienced shooters as opposed to 'shootin' buddies':

 

1. It's OK to say something like "I've never done this before " once or maybe twice - don't do it again - NOBODY CARES.

2. Volunteer on and off to pull targets or at least keep score  - this will help to take your mind off of your shooting anxieties but if you're pulling targets stay very alert.

3. Do not under any circumstances make excuses for your shooting or say something like "I always made a shot like that in the field, on a skeet/trap range, I haven't fired my gun since last year's bird season..." NOBODY CARES .

4. If you end up on a squad shooting your CZ or 1100 and everyone else is shooting K's or P's put it out of your mind - NOBODY CARES what anyone else is shooting.

5. If you're the first shooter on a station before you ask to see the presentations be sure everyone else on our squad is ready to see them and you can ask for a repeat presentation but do not ask for "see birds" over and over and over .

6. As a general rule of thumb  for a beginner do not set up by moving your barrels up and down, in and out , over and under before calling for the bird etc. - pick your break point with the barrel, move your gun half-way back to the trap, call for the bird all the while keeping your gun below the line of the bird.

7. Of course be safe, do not talk while others are shooting, do not comment on anyone's poor shooting, do not ask for advice but if offered graciously accept it but do not belabor it - all common courtesy.

8. Do not keep track of your score - this will only hinder your shooting.

9. Graciously accept an accolade or two when you kill a tough bird but don't be embarrassed when you screw up on an easy bird - even the Master class shooters do it more often then they like.

10. Focus your shooting on your present station. Try not to think of your previous stations - good or bad - or your future stations.

11. Don't obsess with your shooting whether it be good or bad NO ONE ELSE ON YOUR SQUAD CARES - believe me if really good shooters are shooting well they're obsessed with whether or not they can maintain it and if they're shooting poorly they're soon obsessed with what they can possibly do to salvage it.

12. Shooting registered SC targets is not "fun." It can be exhilarating, rewarding, fulfilling or at times the antonyms to all of those but like any other competitive endeavor  it is not "fun". Like my MC shooting buddy is apt to say: "If you want to have fun buy a jet-ski."

 

Hope this helps, probably left a lot out.

 

Ruger 1

 

 

 

 

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JWP58

I really want to get into sporting clays, but it will have to wait until next spring/summer. Anyone shoot at Colorado Clays LLC?

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Cooter Brown
16 minutes ago, Ruger1 said:

 

Since you asked -

 

I've been shooting SC since the mid-80s but never shot a registered bird until three years ago when I really had my arm twisted to try it and my pucker factor the first couple of tournaments was thru the roof. These are my observations and experiences not necessarily in the order of importance and mostly aimed at those beginners shooting registered SCs' targets for the first or second time and assuming they find themselves on a  squad with some experienced shooters as opposed to 'shootin' buddies':

 

1. It's OK to say something like "I've never done this before " once or maybe twice - don't do it again - NOBODY CARES.

2. Volunteer on and off to pull targets or at least keep score  - this will help to take your mind off of your shooting anxieties but if you're pulling targets stay very alert.

3. Do not under any circumstances make excuses for your shooting or say something like "I always made a shot like that in the field, on a skeet/trap range, I haven't fired my gun since last year's bird season..." NOBODY CARES .

4. If you end up on a squad shooting your CZ or 1100 and everyone else is shooting K's or P's put it out of your mind - NOBODY CARES what anyone else is shooting.

5. If you're the first shooter on a station before you ask to see the presentations be sure everyone else on our squad is ready to see them and you can ask for a repeat presentation but do not ask for "see birds" over and over and over .

6. Of course be safe, do not talk while others are shooting, do not comment on anyone's poor shooting, do not ask for advice but if offered graciously accept it but do not belabor it - all common courtesy.

7. Do not keep track of your score - this will only hinder your shooting.

8. Graciously accept an accolade or two when you kill a tough bird but don't be embarrassed when you screw up on an easy bird - even the Master class shooters do it more often then they like.

9. Focus your shooting on your present station. Try not to think of your previous stations - good or bad - or your future stations.

10. Don't obsess with your shooting whether it be good or bad NO ONE ELSE ON YOUR SQUAD CARES - believe me if really good shooters are shooting well they're obsessed with whether or not they can maintain it and if they're shooting poorly they're soon obsessed with what they can possibly do to salvage it.

11. Shooting registered SC targets is not "fun." It can be exhilarating, rewarding, fulfilling or at times the antonyms to all of those but like any other competitive endeavor  it is not "fun". Like my MC shooting buddy is apt to say: "If you want to have fun buy a jet-ski."

 

Hope this helps, probably left a lot out.

 

Ruger 1

 

 

 

 

This is an excellent post.

 

What stops me is it's just so damned expensive.

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KerryLuft

Cooter,

 

It can be VERY expensive -- regional shoots can be $1.50 a bird for some events, and it's not unheard of for a weekend at a big blast to cost well over $2500 -- and there's no money in it to speak of, but registered clays don't have to be that expensive.  In my area, there are plenty of people who shoot a tournament only once or twice a month.  My club charges $55 for 100 registered and $45 for 50 FITASC, which includes a ref.  That's not really a bad deal at all.  If you shot our tournament every month, you would only be out $1200 for the year for 1800 registered targets, which is more than many registered shooters do.

 

I personally am very choosy about the tournaments I attend for that very reason.  I want maximum value for my dollar ... though to be fair, some of those big blast targets are worth it!!!!

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Kemo Sabe

First and foremost, shooting registered should be fun. If it's not fun for you, find something else to do or just shoot hunters clays and don't keep score.

 

Personally, I enjoy the competition. It's a great break from my everyday life of drill, fill, bill and then wait to get paid. It's fun and I enjoy it. So that's why I do it. If it ever isn't fun, I'll take up something else that is.

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quailguy

Cooter:  

What stops me is it's just so damned expensive.

 

That is the other thing that stopped me (aside from its really NOT fun, its stressful.) After I got into registered targets I find that to move up in class you have to, as Kerry sez, shoot about 2 venues a month. Pay for the shoot, pay for the gas, room and food and you are talking at least $500 a shoot, unless you sleep in the back of your vehicle and cook over a campstove. At least $1,000 a month (2 shoots per) and for something that is really not fun?  

 

Nah, not for me, but best wishes to those who do. 

 

I do about 95% of my sporting clays shooting at the National SC HQ in San Antonio. So, I see the place before and during the registered shoots. They have an RV camp for the shooters' use. It is normally full of RVs, most of them are very expensive indeed. Most are far above my price range.  

 

BTW, the guy I was shooting registered targets with was a rep for a major sporting chain who was also an AA shooter and a registered instructor. So his trips were either employer paid or tax deductible. That is how he did it.

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