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KerryLuft

So what's stopping you?

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Kemo Sabe

quailguy,

 

Sounds like register sporting isn't something for you. Cool. But it is a lot of fun for some of us. 

 

I shoot usually five or six competitions a month, and do it for a lot less than $500 per. The event is usually $60 to $75, shells $30, and gas maybe $20 or $25 (usually take turns driving with a friend, so this is a cost half of the time). Plus maybe $20/25 for food. That total is less than I would spend on my kids sports activity on any given day when the four of them were growing up. Or what it costs me to go to an Oakland A's baseball game.

 

On top of that, we have local 5 Stand competitions that are a hoot on either Thursday nights (50 targets for $15) or Sunday mornings ( 75 targets for $60 that include four pay outs plus a big lunch and finger food and soft drinks during the shoot). Lotsa fun!

 

Different strokes for different folks.

 

 

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steveziv

I've been encouraged on numerous occasions to take up registered skeet but never saw the point.  You pay double for targets so that the NSSA can keep track of your score and send you a magazine full of scores.  There are probably a dozen SC fields w/in 1.5 hours of me so I have plenty of opportunities to shoot w/o the added expense of registration.  I do like to compete and do so in a couple skeet leagues and several SC fun and charity shoots (mostly RGS sponsored). 

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Greg Hartman

I shot registered targets for 25 years - skeet, not SC, because when I started in serious competition SC didn't exist.  The choice was trap or skeet.  Skeet appealed to me much more than trap because the more varied presentations seemed more relevant to someone who is a bird hunter at heart.  As a lifelong guncrank, skeet also appealed because it was shot in four different gauges, which left a lot of room for guncrankery (is that a word?).  I started shooting mostly as a form of mental masturbation.  I was working 70-80 hour weeks and building a commercial law firm, paying massive bills to raise a family, pay off all debt, save for retirement, etc, etc during those years and didn't have the time to follow my true passion of dogs and upland hunting.  Rather quickly the competition became an end in itself.

 

The shoots were usually three day events, with a Preliminary late on a Friday and the four "gun" events shot over Saturday and Sunday.  I'd take my wife and my then young kids and we'd camp at the various gun clubs - at first in a tent, then later trailers and finally motorhomes.  The camping with the family and getting to see more or less the same shooters and their families camping at the events was a big part of the fun.  We went all over doing this.

 

I quit this level of shooting after doing well in the 1998 US Open.  Why?  A number of reasons.  My kids were grown and no longer camped with us.  My wife's health was deteriorating and she would no longer come along, so I was going by myself and leaving her unhappily at home.  The group of guys I shot with was aging and going to fewer and fewer shoots.  Total perfection (read: not good shooting per se because the targets are all easy, but rather a complete lack of mistakes) became the standard of performance.  I was stuck in AAA or AA class which meant that missing even one bird in a 400 bird shoot converted the whole competition into very costly practice with zero chance of winning - it was very discouraging - and shooting at that level was stating to feel more like work than fun.  Finally, by that time my firm was built and actually seemed to function quite well when I wasn't there, my bills were all paid, my kids were educated and married - so I decided to just take the time to do what I really wanted to do - namely dogs and upland birds - and to hell I if I lost some income or anything else in the process.

 

While the registered shooting was great fun and a big passion of mine when I was doing it, the time for it has passed in my life and I never missed it for one minute after I quit.  It was like I had stopped beating my head against a wall and was surprised to realize it didn't hurt anymore.

 

 I still shoot every week (mostly SC with some skeet and 5-stand) because I am still a guncrank and because I still enjoy it as an end in itself.  I don't shoot so much as practice for live birds (because, frankly, they are very easy targets for anyone who has done his share of serious competitive shooting) as for pure fun.  I shoot in little local, non-registered competitions frequently and I enjoy that too.  I work rather hard at being the very best I can be, but I'm too old now to be a serious contender to anyone.  Nonetheless, I win the local competitions from time to time - most recently the County .410 championship with my old Model 42 pump, of all things, against scads of 11 pound tubed O/U's!.  I've learned to look at shooting much differently than when I was younger and shooting registered.  These days I thoroughly enjoy just being out there with a gun and my friends burning powder.  I don't get upset if I shoot poorly.  When I actually shoot well on occasion, it's a happy and unexpected bonus.  No more registered shooting for me.

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KerryLuft
8 hours ago, quailguy said:

After I got into registered targets I find that to move up in class you have to, as Kerry sez, shoot about 2 venues a month. Pay for the shoot, pay for the gas, room and food and you are talking at least $500 a shoot, unless you sleep in the back of your vehicle and cook over a campstove.

Wow, that's really not the case at all around me.  There are at least five clubs that throw registered events within 2 hours of my home.  It doesn't hurt that the best is 30 minutes away.

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KerryLuft
7 hours ago, Kemo Sabe said:

On top of that, we have local 5 Stand competitions that are a hoot on either Thursday nights (50 targets for $15) or Sunday mornings ( 75 targets for $60 that include four pay outs plus a big lunch and finger food and soft drinks during the shoot). Lotsa fun!

 

 

Those are fun!

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Kemo Sabe
1 hour ago, KerryLuft said:

Those are fun!

 

Especially when you walk in unknown, tie for HOA, win some money, and have the pretty young scorer keeper asking everyone "who is the new guy? He makes it look so easy!"

 

The fun factor isn't the only thing that goes up.......

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KerryLuft
10 hours ago, quailguy said:

 

 

8 minutes ago, Kemo Sabe said:

 

Especially when you walk in unknown, tie for HOA, win some money, and have the pretty young scorer keeper asking everyone "who is the new guy? He makes it look so easy!"

 

The fun factor isn't the only thing that goes up.......

 

Aw, shucks.

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dogrunner

I originally started to shoot to become a better wing-shooter, in 95 I went and took a few lessons from Lieske. He invited me to a tournament at the place he was teaching. From there I started shooting registered, punched my way to B class and in 03 stopped shooting registered. Reason was about 4 clubs within 50 miles of me quit throwing tournaments and I didn't want to drive 100 or more to a shoot. I have shot hunters class a few different times just to go shoot fitasc targets which is what I like to shoot most. I just rejoined the NSCA so I could register for the Fitasc Grand Prix next year. That is the Biggest tournament my state has ever had so it should be fun, plus some of the best are coming so I get to see them also. The hard part for me is practicing on good targets as I have to travel at least 85 miles round trip to do it. 

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KerryLuft
1 minute ago, dogrunner said:

The hard part for me is practicing on good targets as I have to travel at least 85 miles round trip to do it. 

 

If that's what stops you, maybe it's not for you. :S

 

All kidding aside, that should not be a limiting factor.  I can see that it's a bit much for 100 targets, but not if you go for a full day and shoot a flat. 

 

 

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Keith E. Carlson

Sadly,  there is no place within less than a two hour drive to shoot anything but trap.

Tho  Lewiston is the home to CCI and Speer, wed no longer have a shotgun shooting facility due to airport expansion.

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Kemo Sabe
1 hour ago, dogrunner said:

The hard part for me is practicing on good targets as I have to travel at least 85 miles round trip to do it. 

 

Nothing abnormal about that. My main club is 60 miles each way. 

 

Just part of the game, and that's really not a big travel issue you have.

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KerryLuft

One of the best things about clays is that you can get exactly what you want out of it.

 

If what you want to be truly competitive, you have to work and make some tough choices. Some involve time commitment and others involve financial sacrifice.  A shooting friend can't believe that I hop a plane 3 to 4 times a year to go see Matarese.  I can't believe that given the fact that he shoots a tournament almost every weekend and travels to the US Open and Nationals every year, that he doesn't reprioritize to take some lessons (not necessarily with Anthony, though I truly believe he's the best).

 

Other people say they don't have time to practice.  My response to that is, "When a big blast costs about $1,500, how can you afford NOT to practice so you can perform your best?"  I shoot around 500 shells a week when I'm gearing up for a competition.  I don't always shoot my best as a result, but I feel more confident when I'm prepared -- and that's crucial.

 

I also try to make a trip to a new shooting grounds before I shoot there in competition.  You can bet that I'll make the drive to Bald Mountain before next year's Grand Prix.

 

But I'm fully aware that's not for everyone. If you want to just have some laughs with your buddies, that just costs the price of targets and ammo.

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Kemo Sabe
12 minutes ago, KerryLuft said:

One of the best things about clays is that you can get exactly what you want out of it.

 

If what you want to be truly competitive, you have to work and make some tough choices. Some involve time commitment and others involve financial sacrifice.  A shooting friend can't believe that I hop a plane 3 to 4 times a year to go see Matarese.  I can't believe that given the fact that he shoots a tournament almost every weekend and travels to the US Open and Nationals every year, that he doesn't reprioritize to take some lessons (not necessarily with Anthony, though I truly believe he's the best).

 

Other people say they don't have time to practice.  My response to that is, "When a big blast costs about $1,500, how can you afford NOT to practice so you can perform your best?"  I shoot around 500 shells a week when I'm gearing up for a competition.  I don't always shoot my best as a result, but I feel more confident when I'm prepared -- and that's crucial.

 

I also try to make a trip to a new shooting grounds before I shoot there in competition.  You can bet that I'll make the drive to Bald Mountain before next year's Grand Prix.

 

But I'm fully aware that's not for everyone. If you want to just have some laughs with your buddies, that just costs the price of targets and ammo.

 

That post says it all. It really does.  

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Kemo Sabe

I think that a big issue here is that a lot of  shooters think they are better than they really are. And, they don't want to see that put into an objective format, where there's no place to run or hide. 

 

Nor do they want to take lessons to get better. Or practice -- but if you  take any other sport,  the participants (even the pros) always  practice and take lessons.  

 

Competitive shooting isn't for everyone. And there comes a time for those that do to say "enough is enough". But it is a barometer that tells it like it is, and there are some who have a problem with that. 

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ANF grousin

5 stand, I love it. We dont shoot competitively, or for money, but we do have a lot of fun and grabassery. We have master class shooters and beginner shooters most every night. Targets are set out the evening of the shoot, and at anyone's request, any presentation can be set up. When some shooters are getting ready for bigger shoots, targets are set on the tough side, but even then, there will be a couple soft targets so the beginners arent discouraged. And if there is a certain target you want to work on, they will throw it for you as much as you wont, no need to shoot the menu. $5/round; think of it as an extra practice night.

Competitive shooting, once I take the plunge, I'll only be shooting against myself and have no interest in moving up or down classes.

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