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2018 UJ SUMMER SILENT AUCTION HAS LAUNCHED Read more... ×
KerryLuft

So what's stopping you?

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KerryLuft
9 minutes ago, ANF grousin said:

Competitive shooting, once I take the plunge, I'll only be shooting against myself and have no interest in moving up or down classes.

 

I am going to save this and remind you of this ... again, and again, and again.

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Kemo Sabe

ANF,

 

You're confusing me here. If you have no interest in scores, or moving up and down classes, why do you spend so much time on WinScore, and talking about results?

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steveziv

Nothing to do with registered or competitive shooting but one of the most fun SC scenarios I've encountered is shooting with a competent squad that is figuring out challenging targets together.  I guess individual shooters can do that when practicing as well but its fun to drop the competition and figure the course out as a team.  The later shooters gain an advantage but everyone takes their turn leading and following anyway.

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ANF grousin

Kerry, wont have to remind me of anything. I played the competitive move up game years ago in archery, was fun for a bit, hated it at the end. If I was 20 years younger, I might think differently. Now I just try to learn and improve. If I shoot a score good enough to win B class or lousy enough to fall to the bottom of E class, at the end of the day, nothing will have changed.

Kemo, just like watching baseball and keeping track of players, SC shooters is no different. Watching top shooters and seeing their scores, is like watching a pitcher sit down batter after batter on called 3rd strikes. While I'm far to old to play baseball, I can still pull a trigger and enjoy seeing what the best can do with a shotgun.

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KerryLuft
41 minutes ago, ANF grousin said:

Kerry, wont have to remind me of anything. I played the competitive move up game years ago in archery, was fun for a bit, hated it at the end. If I was 20 years younger, I might think differently. Now I just try to learn and improve. If I shoot a score good enough to win B class or lousy enough to fall to the bottom of E class, at the end of the day, nothing will have changed.

 

Then, I guess my question is, why bother shooting registered? You can learn and improve without the added expense.  Go to the courses the day after the event and shoot the same targets for a cut rate.  I did that for many years and learned a lot.

 

This is just me, but I have always felt the purpose of competing seriously is to win.  And if I wasn't going to try my best to win, I didn't see much purpose in competing. YMMV.

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Rockdoc

Kerry,

Since you asked. I hunt and shoot for enjoyment and comradery with likeminded people. I used to live 1/4 mile from the local trap range and I could actually hear shooting from house. I don’t consider myself much of a shot but having the range so close I got damned good at trap and joined a league. The next thing you know I was shooting just to raise my score and an activity I’d been doing for enjoyment turned into work. At the end of the league season I dropped out and never rejoined.

I eventually quit shooting trap altogether because I found so many of my fellow trap shooters to be anal retentive’s, quick to blame everyone but themselves for a bad round. I now only shoot trap low-gun at the beginning of pheasant/quail season, otherwise it’s 5-stand, sporting clays, or skeet in that order of preference.

Steve

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dogrunner

Thats how trap shooters are they love to complain. :D  

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Samuel Hoggson

Like many UJ brethren, started out much more interested in bird hunting than clays.  But was able early to accept clays as really good practice for honing wing-shooting skills, and developing new ones.  Doubt I'd ever have learned to take dropping WC at distances had it not been worked out at the range.  Same for long pokes at grouse that suddenly reappear through a narrow window.  Used to empty the gun early and watch them reemerge, helpless.  I can't remember a single nice shot I ever made at clay targets, but sure as heck remember the birds.      

 

I got strong-armed into a life membership in NSSA by a dear, departed friend.  Truth is I never cared for registered anything until my son could participate.  Shooting registered (especially NSCA) with him gave me some of my very best memories.  After a lesson with Anthony, he blew by me (and others) at our club.  Haven't beaten him since, and that suits me fine.  When he comes home on a shoot weekend he kicks my butt - if I'm within ten birds I feel pretty good.  Sometimes it's more like 16.

 

Judging from the responses I'm not the only one who needs another mountain to climb like a submarine needs a screen door.  A few mentioned the ample stressors provided by real life.  34 years spent at a life-death type medical subspecialty have me in full agreement with those guys.  Can't be all there is to it, though, b/c one of my colleagues just loves NSCA competition, travels to shoots, practices often and hard, is working toward Master for the second time.  Just not for me.  Don't shoot many registered targets without the kid.  Last year one of the club officers suggested the kid and I both refuse automatic down-classification, so we did.  We have no desire to get in the way of someone who wants to climb the mountain.  Unfortunately, the kid still wins his class most every time he shoots.  

 

Not that I don't like learning to break 50 yd chondelles and such, but I'm just as happy doping wind and hitting 100 yd steel with an Anschutz, introducing kids to clays or machineguns, or even doing something mindless like case prep for my .308 RPR.

 

Do like the social aspects or the shotgun sports.  Most of the really good shooters are a joy to shoot with, and don't get distracted by someone who, like me, just isn't that focused.  This begs the legitimate question:  why shoot registered at all?  For us it's kinda like Sutton's law - "cuz that's where the interesting targets are".  We can go on off days, set up machines, and have at 60 yd teals.  But there's something to be said for letting someone else figure a way to teach us something.   

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ANF grousin

When I get to a registered shoot, I'll be shooting as serious and competing as hard as I can. But when all the scores are on. win, lose, or finish at the bottom. I wont let it consume me.

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dogrunner

I shoot when I can its not enough for me but I do many different things. Most of my target work for this year is done, it's hunting season I don't start shooting again till Dec for our trap league . Which is not my preferred game but it is something to do through the winter. 

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fourtrax57

The average age at our local gun club is about 77. After trap league is done for the Summer it would be fun to shoot wobble trap, handicaps, annie oakleys, anything to mix it up a bit. Most there are stuck in the same old rut. We are a small club with only trap range & a 500 yd rifle range. When I'm home there are rounds of trap shot weekly into about the first wk. of bird season. I'll shoot low gun trap so as to mount each time then call pull. This year I haven't shot clays of any kind since Mid July. Starting to get on target for live birds now.

     Trap isn't the greatest game for practice on live birds but it's our only game.

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PartridgeCartridge

I think it is a great question that deserves a true answer.

 

First and foremost, this is a site for people that have a true passion for bird hunting. And there, is the real crux of the issue.

 

I am a fervent supporter of developing shooting skills, ESPECIALLY, game shooting skills. Personally, I don't think most hunters have proficient skills in this area. The problem is that we are also dog lovers too and the work and effort to develop a fine dog is a serious time and money investment. We only have so much time.

 

In a perfect world, we would have the time to develop our critters and learn to be really good shooters.

 

So we strike a balance hopefully.

 

JMO

 

 

 

 

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dogrunner

Yes PC that is my focus and well I do ok on both ends and have fun doing it. 

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KerryLuft
1 hour ago, PartridgeCartridge said:

We only have so much time.

 

In a perfect world, we would have the time to develop our critters and learn to be really good shooters.

 

So we strike a balance hopefully.

 

JMO

 

 

Well said.  I was having a discussion along these lines with a new friend the other day.  He asked if I played golf. "No. I shoot and hunt."  He asked if I fished. "Not really. I shoot and hunt."  He asked if ... well, you get the idea.  And while I'm starting a new Lab at the moment, it's already apparent that I had better not get into hunt tests or field trials if I want to keep shooting at a relatively serious level.

 

Choices -- and there are no bad ones, except not to fish, shoot or hunt at all.

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ANF grousin

Add in kids, or for us older shooters, grandkids.

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