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SLR

Anaplasmosis

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SLR

I thought I would relate my experience with Anaplasmosis to inform the readers.  In May 2014 my then 7 yo setter Java started to show a gait that looked off, sort of clumsy and gimpy.  It was clear that more than one limb was involved.  She was having trouble going up and down stairs. I took her to our vet and the Snap 4 Dx showed she was positive for Anaplasmosis and she was treated with Doxycycline for 14 days. Within 48 hours she was showing clear clinical improvement and she recovered uneventfully.  This past summer she injured a rt rear leg and wouldn't bear weight on it for many days. Exam showed nothing definite, negative Drawer sign and this injury improved but would occasionally result in some lameness after hard runs for several months. That brings us up to the present. Four days ago she suddenly had a gimpy gait again, affecting all limbs and I suspected Anaplasmosis or Lyme and started her on Doxy.  After 3 days she showed no improvement, so I got her in to the vet that day and had her worked up with blood tests and the Snap 4Dx, which again showed she was Anaplasmosis positive, Lyme negative, and all the other lab tests were normal. She is now 9 yo and intact, so pyometra was one concern to be ruled out. She had a low fever of 103+.  She was eating ok, no vomiting or diarrhea. The vet thought there might be a possibility that the previous 14 day Rx 2 years before might have left her with a carrier state that reactivated and it might be possible that the organism now had some resistance to the Doxy. She had a visible small effusion in her rt. carpal joint and pain was elicited with range of motion tests of her rear legs.  She could barely walk at this point.  Had the classic gait of walking on egg shells, like her feet were tender.  So she was prescribed Clavamox x 20 days and a 5 day course of Metacam (anti-inflammatory) and the plan is to finish up with a 30 day course of Doxy.  I believe the current recommendation is to treat these two tick born bacterial diseases for 30 days.  Much to my relief she showed obvious improvement within 24 hours and hopefully we can get her through the antibiotic treatments without a serious side effect.

 

This is a fairly good article on the Anaplasmosis infection in dogs:  http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/update-anaplasmosis-dogs

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dogrunner

I think 14 days is not enough for any tick born disease be it man or beast, a month is much better to get rid of it if it is a fresh bite. Good luck and lets us know how it goes. 

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Up North

We delt with it a couple times. I believe our dogs were put on doxy for three weeks.

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Pudgy gopher

I contracted this myself this fall. They had me on Doxi for 30 days. I have a dog positive for lymes and we have him on doxi for 120 days. This is twice the normal course of treatment but we believe he has had it for 3 months and the vet wants to make sure to knock out any potential for residual reinfection.

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Pomoxis

Where are you located

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Dave Quindt
On 1/6/2017 at 6:12 PM, dogrunner said:

I think 14 days is not enough for any tick born disease be it man or beast, a month is much better to get rid of it if it is a fresh bite. 

I once asked my vet what the logic was behind his 30 day doxy dosage he normally prescribed; his answer was "long enough to take care of most problems but not too long that cost or human compliance with the dosage instructions became problematic."  When I told him I was willing to pay for and deliver a 60 day dose to improve the odds of success he said "absolutely, go for it". Of course, I watched for side effects.

 

I've never heard of a doxy dosage for a tick-borne disease that was less than 30 days.

 

FWIW,

Dave

 

 

 

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Pudgy gopher

St cloud but I believe I and the dog were exposed near Grand Rapids

 

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SLR

Follow up and case 2:

Java has done well on her antibiotic course. She got three weeks of Clavamox, so that a bactericidal antibiotic could be used. Now she is on a 30 day course of Doxycycline. She showed improvement within 24 hours or so, but it took about a week before all her signs of polyarthritis were gone. An internist who treats many of these diseases told me he was not aware of any cases reported of the organisms for Lyme or Anaplasmosis that were resistant to Doxycycline.

 

Case 2: My 5 year old setter Kooper was on restricted activity to rest his bicipital tenosynovitis for the previous 2 weeks and he was responding gradually. That means he had no free running, watered outside on a long lead or walked on a lead.  This is relevant because it means he had no chance to get into anything and eat something he shouldn't have eaten. Then about a week ago, we noted he went out and had diarrhea, a tan puddle of stool and he also vomited some stomach juice with a bit of grass in it. At the same time, he became anorexic.  He might eat a little of a special treat we make, but otherwise showed no interest in food. A week or so before this, our beagle also went off her food, but it only lasted 24 hours, so I thought maybe they had some minor GI virus.  However, Kooper continued to refuse food for several more days. On physical exam he was normal. His belly was soft, no masses, no enlarged liver or spleen. His temperature was 102.5. He showed no lameness, except the residual biceps problem.I did a rectal exam and emptied his anal glands and noted he had no stool in the rectum and he was tender when I palpated all the way in with my finger. He had no more vomiting or diarrhea. On a walk, he had two brown soft BMs with bloody mucus at the end. When he was not recovering appetite on the third day, it was off to the vet.  She didn't find anything on physical exam either, so blood work was done. He had a moderate leukopenia (low white cell count) with a marked neutropenia (low polymorphonuclear cells) and elevated monocytes. Up until those results, the vet and I had not suspected tick borne illness. So a Snap 4 Dx was done and Kooper was positive for both Anaplasmosis and Lyme disease. Kooper has been vaccinated annually for Lyme, so either the vaccine failed or it was a false positive test. I call Kooper a tick magnet, because he likes to roll in the leaves and he picks up more than his share of ticks when they are in season, despite efforts to prevent them. 

Kooper is on an antibiotic regimen and now after two days of treatment, he is eating normally again. I write this story to show the readers how varied the presentation of these tick borne diseases can be. I think the good clinical response along with the positive Snap test strongly suggests that his problem is Anaplasmosis, or Lyme, or both. 

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Dogwood

How long has it been since any of the dogs mentioned tested negative on a snap test prior to these incidents?

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SLR
5 hours ago, Dogwood said:

How long has it been since any of the dogs mentioned tested negative on a snap test prior to these incidents?

Java had tested positive for Anaplasmosis in May, 2014 (negative for Lyme) and positive again for Anaplasmosis this recent episode with polyarthritis. No prior negative test for her.  I don't find a previous test in Kooper's record, so I think this test was his first. He had been healthy up until this episode.

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gunsrus

Tough one Solon , thank you for sharing . Give Java and Kooper a hug for me . 

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frak

Thanks.  These are important posts for all of us to ponder.  

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dogrunner
On January 14, 2017 at 4:32 PM, Dave Quindt said:

I once asked my vet what the logic was behind his 30 day doxy dosage he normally prescribed; his answer was "long enough to take care of most problems but not too long that cost or human compliance with the dosage instructions became problematic."  When I told him I was willing to pay for and deliver a 60 day dose to improve the odds of success he said "absolutely, go for it". Of course, I watched for side effects.

 

I've never heard of a doxy dosage for a tick-borne disease that was less than 30 days.

 

FWIW,

Dave

 

 

 

I have from Doctor and vet but I would ask for more for myself and the dog. 

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