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gaberdeen

You got to be kidding me.

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WI Outdoor Nut
14 hours ago, NECarson said:

I've never messed with them, fortunately. But I've heard they are an incredible pain. 

 

I work on the wife's BMW, no problem, don't mind at all. GM has done some incredibly stupid stuff with brakes! The simplest thing on a vehicle! 

I had two chevy's and did almost all the maintenance on them.  My biggest gripe with them is they way they ran the ABS monitoring system through the front hub to the bearing.  That caused me to replace 6 bearings (at ~$300 a crack) in less than 100K miles.  My issue, the truck was a sunday driver, and often would get moisture in the bearing, and then it would sit.  Once I was looking for a new truck, and GM did not change the design, I started to look at other options. 

 

FWIW - never did like the brakes on my Chev.  My current F150 is waaay better in that regard. 

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Rockdoc

When I hear about quotes of $1950 for brake jobs I often wonder how these sub-human creatures can even look at themselves in the mirror without becoming disgusted and ill. I do about 95% of my own mechanical work and I typically keep a car for 250-300K miles. When a friend asked me why I keep a car for so many miles my answer was simply ‘Because I can!’ I’m currently parked in my RV home-on-wheels in Deer Lodge Montana. When I arrived at the RV park I gave the park owner a business card advertising my services as a handyman/repairman and asked for referrals. In the past month I’ve done a brake job on a neighbors PU truck, packed the wheel bearings on a tow dolly (after I repaired the dolly’s running lights), I repaired some plumbing on another RV, and I’ve repaired two of the washing machines in the RV parks laundromat. If anyone wonders how I can not only live, but travel and enjoy life on a social security income, now you know.

Steve

PS gaberdeen, did you get Advance Auto’s lifetime warranty on brake parts? The last three brake jobs on my 2005 Dodge Caravan have been free thanks to their lifetime warranty!

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Don Steese

Way back when, service departments at new car dealerships were mostly about "service" especially to people who'd bought cars there. Today they're major profit centers with service "writers" who's main job is to sell service, whether you really need it or not!

I was an auto mechanics major in high school and did my own service work for many years. I now take my cars to a local guy who I've known for years. His son has now joined him at his little shop. They need to make a living but they don't overcharge. I'm glad to give them my business.

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gaberdeen
51 minutes ago, Rockdoc said:

When I hear about quotes of $1950 for brake jobs I often wonder how these sub-human creatures can even look at themselves in the mirror without becoming disgusted and ill. I do about 95% of my own mechanical work and I typically keep a car for 250-300K miles. When a friend asked me why I keep a car for so many miles my answer was simply ‘Because I can!’ I’m currently parked in my RV home-on-wheels in Deer Lodge Montana. When I arrived at the RV park I gave the park owner a business card advertising my services as a handyman/repairman and asked for referrals. In the past month I’ve done a brake job on a neighbors PU truck, packed the wheel bearings on a tow dolly (after I repaired the dolly’s running lights), I repaired some plumbing on another RV, and I’ve repaired two of the washing machines in the RV parks laundromat. If anyone wonders how I can not only live, but travel and enjoy life on a social security income, now you know.

Steve

PS gaberdeen, did you get Advance Auto’s lifetime warranty on brake parts? The last three brake jobs on my 2005 Dodge Caravan have been free thanks to their lifetime warranty!

Yep I sure did. Went with heavy duty rotors and pads as I tow my camper quite a bit.

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NECarson
1 hour ago, Rockdoc said:

When I hear about quotes of $1950 for brake jobs I often wonder how these sub-human creatures can even look at themselves in the mirror without becoming disgusted and ill. I do about 95% of my own mechanical work and I typically keep a car for 250-300K miles. When a friend asked me why I keep a car for so many miles my answer was simply ‘Because I can!’ I’m currently parked in my RV home-on-wheels in Deer Lodge Montana. When I arrived at the RV park I gave the park owner a business card advertising my services as a handyman/repairman and asked for referrals. In the past month I’ve done a brake job on a neighbors PU truck, packed the wheel bearings on a tow dolly (after I repaired the dolly’s running lights), I repaired some plumbing on another RV, and I’ve repaired two of the washing machines in the RV parks laundromat. If anyone wonders how I can not only live, but travel and enjoy life on a social security income, now you know.

Steve

PS gaberdeen, did you get Advance Auto’s lifetime warranty on brake parts? The last three brake jobs on my 2005 Dodge Caravan have been free thanks to their lifetime warranty!

Try pricing OEM parts for brakes. 

 

Liability in this world is crazy. 

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Cheesy

I actually enjoy doing brake jobs, makes me feel accomplished.  Last set was the rears on the wife's Yukon.  Coming down Pikes Peak last fall, kept hearing that annoying squeek when you hit the brakes lightly.  Figured I'd be ok, but then driving those long mountain roads with the windows rolled down it became annoying.  Pulled into an O'Reilly's in Canyon City, bought rotors, pads, a 1/2" socket set and a C-clamp.  An hour later both backs were changed (had done the fronts before leaving).  Could have just bent the damn squeeler piece back and got another couple thousand miles, but oh well, was an excuse to buy a socket set with no griping from the wife ;)

 

Another vote for the University of Youtube.  Timing belt and head gasket on my commuter Honda Civic while watching videos on youtube.  The little water lever on the refridgerator that my 4 year old son broke and couldn't figure out how to take the door apart, youtube solved it.  How to access the number 5 cylinder to change the coil without pulling the whole intake apart, youtube.  It saves me time and money.

 

I had a roommate in college talking about drum brakes.  "Watching my dad do those on his 70's era cars, thats when I learned how to cuss."

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Rockdoc

I used a brake job to teach my teenage son how to not only repair brakes but to think and solve problems himself as well. He’d gotten a well-used Toyota Celica and it needed a complete front and rear brake job. Since it had rear drum brakes, which were far more complicated than front disc brakes, I set him to work on the rear brakes first.

“Okay son jack up the right rear wheel, put a jack-stand under it and get to work taking the right rear brake assembly apart. Call me when it’s apart. By the way, loosen the lug bolts on the wheel before you jack it up.”

A while later he comes in and then we both go out and I inspect the brake components. I point out what needs to be replaced and why and put him back to work. A short time later he comes in and whines “Dad I don’t remember how it goes back together.” I said, “Son why are you coming to me, that shouldn’t be a problem.” He gives me a quizzical look and together we go back out to the car.

We stood there looking at the car and I told him “I’ll bet you wish you had a model of the assembled brake assembly to go by, dontcha.” He silently nods his head yes. I pointed to the unassembled left rear brake assembly and said “Well there it is, you’d better get to it and pull off that left rear brake drum, it’ll be getting dark soon. By the way, don’t forget to loosen the lug nuts before you jack it up and make sure you use a jack stand.”

My son grew up to be a computer network administrator and repair guru, but he still calls me up when he becomes stumped on a car repair problem.

Steve

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DonT

Another tip when the check engine light comes on take it to 1 of the big box auto parts stores, they will put a code scanner on it for free.  

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River19
9 hours ago, DonT said:

Another tip when the check engine light comes on take it to 1 of the big box auto parts stores, they will put a code scanner on it for free.  

 

Sure beats the hell out of a "Diagnostic fee" from a dealer..... :-)

 

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DonT
5 hours ago, River19 said:

 

Sure beats the hell out of a "Diagnostic fee" from a dealer..... :-)

 

That's correct, the code readers are making it easier to diagnose the problems.  Also these stores are open late hours and on Sundays.  

 

A few months back I get a call from my sister, her check light is on and the car is running rough.  Now my sister is raising 2 teen age girls alone and money is tight, not uncommon now a days.  She's telling me that a few weeks ago she had brakes done for $2000 and just can't afford to put more money into the car right now.   The cars a 2010 BMW X3 with 90k miles and her experience is that every time it goes into the shop it's $1k to $2k in repairs.  So at 8PM on a Friday night I'm at the store getting a scan and picking up parts.  I thought it was a coil and I was correct but which 1.  I decided to do plugs at the same time and only replace the bad coil.  I had a coupon on my phone, so $90 for everything.  My guess is that the BMW dealer would do all coils for $600/$800 maybe $1,000, plus plugs and then find something else.  The next morning she came over and played with the dog for a hour and left with a big smile.  

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SEPAlander
On 8/1/2017 at 7:49 PM, Rockdoc said:

We stood there looking at the car and I told him “I’ll bet you wish you had a model of the assembled brake assembly to go by, dontcha.” He silently nods his head yes. I pointed to the unassembled left rear brake assembly and said “Well there it is, you’d better get to it and pull off that left rear brake drum, it’ll be getting dark soon. By the way, don’t forget to loosen the lug nuts before you jack it up and make sure you use a jack stand.”

My son grew up to be a computer network administrator and repair guru, but he still calls me up when he becomes stumped on a car repair problem.

Steve

My dad did the exact same thing to me on a '76 Chevy Beauville, except it wasn't my car and I wasn't old enough to drive.  Tore the driver side rear brakes apart, had no idea how to put them back together, dad came out, put a jackstand up, told me to pull the passenger side tire off and use that as a template.  When he bought a Camry years later, I finally learned the joys of brake jobs on disc brakes!

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