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Speedgoat44

Fix truck or trade truck...a timeless dilemma

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Speedgoat44

I drive a '97 GMC Sierra.  It has just shy of 90k miles and has been exclusively a hunting/fishing rig since we bought it used 7 yrs ago.  We've known that we'd have a few repairs to face eventually and that time has come.  We're looking at a leaky intake manifold ($700-800) recharging the A/C  $$$ ??? and a possible fuel pump, not sure.  The truck has been paid for since day one - $7000.   Having just seen my first $78,000 truck at the rodeo, I can appreciate what having a truck that is paid for means.  If I have to throw $2K that's like 6 months worth of payments on a (much) newer truck.  On the other hand, will we nickle and dime ourselves for the next 5 yrs and then end up trading off?  We've faced this dilemma before, as have most folks - what's your thought process on this dilemma in general?  How do you determine your stop/loss on the vehicles you drive?  

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terrym

I normally drive my vehicles to 300,000 kms and then flip them. Up until that point mostly normal wear and maintenance. If I was to lose confidence in a vehicle getting me home that day, it would sold the next day. Will not own or drive a vehicle I can't trust. 

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sdspringer49

90k is low miles these days. As Terry said if you can't trust it it's time to part with it but at 90k it should have a lot of life left in it. 

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Scrappy

Yeah, if you can't trust it, let it go.  BUT, 90K is not a lot of miles so you may want to have a trusted mechanic do a thorough once over to see if there is anything else wrong with it.  You can do a lot of yearly repairs and still not come close to the payments on a new truck.  My last truck I had for 15 years and let it go at 248K miles.

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Clueless1

Right now running a 2004 Honda CRV with 225K miles.  An F150 (2001 though) with 100K and a Honda Pilot (2015, wife drives a LOT) with 55K.  I have a son that just started driving, still on a permit where one of us has to be with him for another few months.  So far in life I have been able to get the wife something 'fairly' new so I don't have to worry about her breaking down and me?  Well, we have two for me.  Now that I am facing two drivers that will not be me if something happens, not sure what to do.  It's an age old question.  Go with the gut and don't look back. 

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max2

My only thoughts are if it doesn't get used a lot it might nickle and dime you. If I had a truck I liked - as long as the body was still in good shape I would spend to fix it. It is the down time between use that takes it's toll on vehicles(IMO ) Sounds like a truck with potential. 

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Dogwood
7 hours ago, terrym said:

I normally drive my vehicles to 300,000 kms and then flip them. Up until that point mostly normal wear and maintenance. If I was to lose confidence in a vehicle getting me home that day, it would sold the next day. Will not own or drive a vehicle I can't trust. 

 

7 hours ago, sdspringer49 said:

90k is low miles these days. As Terry said if you can't trust it it's time to part with it but at 90k it should have a lot of life left in it. 

 

I don't understand this line of thought, very nebulous IMO.  What specifically makes one "lose confidence" in a machine?  Any and every thing on a vehicle can be repaired/replaced essentially.  Help me out here.

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terrym

Some issues are "intermittent" and often electronic that can require a vehicle be left with a tech to diagnose. Some times repeatedly. Another deal breaker for me are trannys. If they act up when a truck is high mileage I don't want to sink thousands in repairs. I have been pretty lucky with my rules so far and avoided major repairs except for a Chevy Blazer I once owned that I repaired a head gasket only to have the crank bearings fail a few months later. Should have dumped it earlier. 

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Brad Eden

Truly a dilemma. I'm in it too....06 Tundra with 175k. Like all Yotas she just won't quit but the new parts and repairs are starting to stack up. Just had lower ball joints put in last week. Love this rig but with that many miles little annoying things happen, like a chortle sound coming from inside dashboard when on highway. Something loose I can't get too, so I turn up radio. Heater knobs not working right....but still runs like a charm, is paid for and I can't afford a car payment now or maybe ever. So I'm in the drive it into the ground category. Luckily I have a fair and competent local mechanic who keeps me on the road.

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UplandHntr

If it will remain a hunt truck and you wont travel to far remote areas, doesnt have electrical gremlins, Id keep it. 

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sdspringer49
1 hour ago, Dogwood said:

 

 

I don't understand this line of thought, very nebulous IMO.  What specifically makes one "lose confidence" in a machine?  Any and every thing on a vehicle can be repaired/replaced essentially.  Help me out here.

For me losing confidence means having to put more into something than its worth. I have driven rusty 20 year old vehicles but if they get to the point where it needs major engine or tyranny work, then I lose confidence because I won't spend thousands on a pile of junk and I won't trust it to do what I need. 

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bobman

IMO rust or accident are the only two reasons that it doesn't make economic sense to keep repairing a truck

 

 

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settem

$800 for an intake gasket seems excessive...

I can do it in a long day with,frequent beer breaks, 🍺

Fuel pump is easy...

get a couple pals to help you lift the bed off, or jack the front of the bed up with a timber and a floor jack, I've done it both ways. 

Make sure you block the bed up good if you choose to do it by yourself with a jack. 

Thats sounds like a good low mileage truck that just needs a little love...

 

 

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grousehunter 61

No need for me to reply,  I am still driving my 1971 chevy 4x4 pickup, over 500,000.00 miles, I just put my rebuilt transmission in, I will put another 5 hundred thousand miles on it if I live that long. I look at the insurance and the license and the payments, it cost me $ 30.00 a year to license and no payments. You can do the intake yourself,  don't turn over the motor, mark on the firewall where your rotor cap is pointed with a felt pen, mark the body of the distributor directly under the rotor then pull it out. when you put it back in it will twist, so watch which way it came out and just do it backward , No biggie.   

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greg jacobs

The gm antifreeze causes the intake gasket to go. Been there done that. 100 miles from home and had to change it in my sons garage. And with his tools. Not mine O.o. But got home before the weekend was up.

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