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Brad Eden

And so it begins....and continues...

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garyRI
5 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

A bow pushing 350+fps may have punched it through that shoulder. Never know.

 

I am using a Barnett 410 Ghost crossbow so might not be a fair comparison.

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max2
22 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

 

They have their drawbacks which are typically made up for with their accuracy. I used Muzzy fixed for years, but it was a chore to get them to fly like fieldpoints. I don't have great form, so no matter how I tried I'd always have to readjust my sights etc, when switching from practice points to broadhead. I like expandables, and their are some on the market that are more solid than what I'm using or I like some of the more compact fixed Im seeing these days.

Yes and the biggest drawback right now is you will question them in your mind . You have enough to worry about . There is no reason for them to fly any better then a fixed blade. ( media hype :D) I swore by them until I had an identical situation as you did.   When they work-They work ! Talk about ventilation .

 

  Nothing beats a fixed blade . My bows older then yours and I never readjusted my bow between tips.

1) shoot a lot 2) anchor point  - providing correct arrow weight -lining up fixed blade of again correct broadhead weight with fletching's The bow you have is a good bow. Many of the folks I used to shoot with used that very bow with great results.  Keep at it and keep a cool head and everything works. 

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OldSarge

October 1st (yesterday) is Michigan archery deer opener. The UP has antler point restrictions again this year for the third year in a row, so does are off the menu. I sat yesterday morning and saw a big lone doe, no fawn. Usually she would have been on the hit list as a beautiful meat deer, but due to the current regs I had to let her walk. Yesterday evening I sat in a different stand that had some buck rubs nearby. Saw four does, a spike buck (not legal with Combo tag) and a 7 point. The rack buck came in just at the end of good light, but he was angled toward me. No good shot opportunity. Finally just as light faded he turned and angled away. I drew my trusty Mathews Outback (same as Brad's) and sent the G5 Striker through the back of the near lung and out the front of the offside lung, right tight behind the off shoulder. High donkey kick, jump jump, stop. I can hear the blood raining down on the oak leaves. Yes! He's going to tip over right there. Wait, what? Where is he going? Just walking off like he's taking a stroll. What the heck happened? I waited ten minutes and climbed down out of the oak to check the arrow. Luminock was glowing so the arrow was easy to find. Bright red blood everywhere at the impact site. I went to where he jumped and stood and there were pools of blood. Where he walked off there was a steady stream of red like a truck with a blown tranny seal. I followed the trail for about 60 yards, expecting to see white belly or horns any second. No joy. The blood dried up. Gone. About 20 yards from last blood found a dime size drop. Ok, now I have a direction. 10 yards later and I see the glint of another spot. He's running. At least he's on a main trail. I find one more spot about 10 yards farther. Did I belly punch him? Just rake him? The shot felt good, but it was getting dark. Starting to get that bad feeling down in my belly. Now it starts to sprinkle rain. Not a downpour, but enough to make all the glinting of wet blood disappear (I'm color blind so red/green can be challenging). Ok, if he's dead, he's dead. Find him in the morning. If he's shot too far back don't push him, back out and find him in the morning.

 

The next morning I tooted up a couple friends and we went back to the spot of last blood. No one could find any more blood, but we were confident we could find my buck. Two and a half hours later, still no more sign of blood. Then my buddy Skip says the magic words "I got blood." 30 yards away from my last marked spot. Now we have a better direction, but still no more blood after that spot. Now it starts to rain again. That sinking feeling in my guts is getting really acute. We decide to form a skirmish line and walk four abreast and scour 100 yards looking for any sign. 10 minutes later Skip calls out to me. "Bring your knife". In total my buck ran about 150yds. He was dead on his feet and just did a death sprint. There was a big gob of blood and tissue plugging the exit wound. Happy ending. He is now skinned and quartered and in my meat cooler fridge.

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max2
11 hours ago, OldSarge said:

October 1st (yesterday) is Michigan archery deer opener. The UP has antler point restrictions again this year for the third year in a row, so does are off the menu. I sat yesterday morning and saw a big lone doe, no fawn. Usually she would have been on the hit list as a beautiful meat deer, but due to the current regs I had to let her walk. Yesterday evening I sat in a different stand that had some buck rubs nearby. Saw four does, a spike buck (not legal with Combo tag) and a 7 point. The rack buck came in just at the end of good light, but he was angled toward me. No good shot opportunity. Finally just as light faded he turned and angled away. I drew my trusty Mathews Outback (same as Brad's) and sent the G5 Striker through the back of the near lung and out the front of the offside lung, right tight behind the off shoulder. High donkey kick, jump jump, stop. I can hear the blood raining down on the oak leaves. Yes! He's going to tip over right there. Wait, what? Where is he going? Just walking off like he's taking a stroll. What the heck happened? I waited ten minutes and climbed down out of the oak to check the arrow. Luminock was glowing so the arrow was easy to find. Bright red blood everywhere at the impact site. I went to where he jumped and stood and there were pools of blood. Where he walked off there was a steady stream of red like a truck with a blown tranny seal. I followed the trail for about 60 yards, expecting to see white belly or horns any second. No joy. The blood dried up. Gone. About 20 yards from last blood found a dime size drop. Ok, now I have a direction. 10 yards later and I see the glint of another spot. He's running. At least he's on a main trail. I find one more spot about 10 yards farther. Did I belly punch him? Just rake him? The shot felt good, but it was getting dark. Starting to get that bad feeling down in my belly. Now it starts to sprinkle rain. Not a downpour, but enough to make all the glinting of wet blood disappear (I'm color blind so red/green can be challenging). Ok, if he's dead, he's dead. Find him in the morning. If he's shot too far back don't push him, back out and find him in the morning.

 

The next morning I tooted up a couple friends and we went back to the spot of last blood. No one could find any more blood, but we were confident we could find my buck. Two and a half hours later, still no more sign of blood. Then my buddy Skip says the magic words "I got blood." 30 yards away from my last marked spot. Now we have a better direction, but still no more blood after that spot. Now it starts to rain again. That sinking feeling in my guts is getting really acute. We decide to form a skirmish line and walk four abreast and scour 100 yards looking for any sign. 10 minutes later Skip calls out to me. "Bring your knife". In total my buck ran about 150yds. He was dead on his feet and just did a death sprint. There was a big gob of blood and tissue plugging the exit wound. Happy ending. He is now skinned and quartered and in my meat cooler fridge.

Good recovery . Where was he it ? was it where you thought after you field dressed ? Sounded like a liver hit to me when you commented on the bronco kick.  Again good job !

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OldSarge

He was hit as I described above, although I wanted to hit a few inches farther forward. Could very well have hit liver also, but everything was forward of the diaphragm. The inside of the chest cavity was a jello mess and one of the clots gobbed up the exit hole. Kind of disappointed in that fact. A larger broadhead would have made a bigger exit so it might not have clogged. However, my G5 Strikers fly great and are solid heads. Normally I aim to come out in front of the off shoulder and don't have any issues finding hit deer. Jump jump dead. This buck was hit well, but like someone else said, it is a game of inches. 2 inches farther forward and I would have hit the offside leg bone, either breaking the leg or not exiting leaving no downstream hole. I got lucky and am glad I have some experienced hunter friends to help track when necessary (hopefully not often).

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Brad Eden

IMG_0508.JPG

 

Redemption. Bow Doe taken last evening at around 5:30. A piebald deer with mottled legs, part white ears and white sprinkled over body. But not pronounced enough to tan hide.

 

IMG_0509.JPG

 

25 yards and not a great shot. Basic Rage 100 grain two blade expandable. Didn't have the room to stop her and let if fly as she emerged from behind a Pine tree that I had ranged at 23 yards. She was moving slowly and caught her back. Sparse blood, couldn't find arrow, and a tough blood trail so me and my buddy Scott left trail after an hour and a half in the dark. I hated to leave her ovenite with yotes and temps in mid 50's but that was the decision. This morning at first light we were back, and we found arrow covered in blood 50 yards from hit, and we found her 50 yards from where we had last flagged blood with toilet paper. She traveled a couple hundred yards. It wasn't a complete pass through but arrow did exit some and guts were plugging up exit hole. She wasn't bloated, not filled with air, but certainly not as clean as a freshly killed deer. Cleaned her out real well, washed her out, and stuffed her with ice bags. Decided it best to get her quartered and in a cooler ASAP so opted to bring her to my butcher/game processer rather than cutting her up myself or with a Mike Stenstrom. Temps too warm to hang and I have no cooler. I'm gonna get an old fridge and clear shelves and put it in my garage soon for times like these.

 

IMG_0510.JPG

 

115 lbs fully dressed. Butcher looked her over and thinks the meat should be fine. He was skinning and quartering when I left. Inner loin may be tainted, unfortunately, but I'm glad I recovered her.

 

The outdoor life is good for an aging but determined  hunter in Maine.

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Scrappy

Looks like good-eating to me.  The markings on the hide are pretty cool.

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mccuha

Is that an average size doe    Around here that's a monster. A fridge makes a good cooler.  Can only really put one deer in it but does a good job. 

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Brad Eden
5 minutes ago, mccuha said:

Is that an average size doe    Around here that's a monster. A fridge makes a good cooler.  Can only really put one deer in it but does a good job. 

 

Generally yes. She's likely a 1.5 year old deer and a little larger than normal for that age. She was traveling alone which is a bit unusual, barren, no milk, and no fawns or what we call skippers with her. Maine deer are big. 

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mccuha

Our average doe is probably 80-100 live weight. A 2-3 year old buck will be under 150.  You see see a few piebald deer around but use to see a lot more back in the day. I wonder if that's typical for piebalds to be sterile 

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gundogpa

Nice work.

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NCgrouse
14 hours ago, mccuha said:

Our average doe is probably 80-100 live weight. A 2-3 year old buck will be under 150.  You see see a few piebald deer around but use to see a lot more back in the day. I wonder if that's typical for piebalds to be sterile 

 

Same around here. Deer look like small dogs compared to the brutes up there. 

 

Congrats Brad. Good deer.

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MAArcher

Nice, congrats.  That would have been a nice pelt to attempt your own brain tanning on.  You don't take the tender loins before giving it to the butcher?  I'm not that trusting I guess.  I've had them go missing before.

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topdog1961

Nice job Brad. A few years back my son hit a button buck similarly and we didn't find him until the next morning in similar temps. We processed the meat immediately and I noted an irredescent sheen to the meat when it was sliced, like ham sometimes does. Much more so than one cooled quickly after the kill. And maybe it was my mind playing tricks but it also smelled a little more "gamey" than normal. Maybe the steaks would be fine but I decided to make brats out if it as they are seasoned. They were great. 

 

I on on the other hand, jinxed myself by building a 4x8 deer cooler last year for early season deer. The only problem is I can't kill one to put in it. 

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Brad Eden

I trust this guy, and I asked him to package each inner loin whole as opposed to cutting the backstraps.

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