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      TO THOSE REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UJ   01/06/2018

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MAArcher

Caring for an older dog

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MAArcher
2 hours ago, Irish Joe said:

Metacam is often prescribed the same as Rimadyl. Monitoring only takes place when it is prescribed as an everyday medication, as prolonged use can lead to problems. My vet advised using it as preventative medicine before a hard day's hunt. Others use it on an old dog after a tough hunt. I will not be using it everyday.

That makes sense, thanks!

 

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NC Quailhunter

I have a 14 yr old GSP. Three years ago he could barely move and get around. standing to eat was a problem and he walked very gingerly. We started him on Cosequin and have not missed a dose. He will never hunt again but he now bounces around like he used to as a younger dog to go out he runs in the yard not near as fast or as long but he is able to get around. He still gets up slow but he can get up. Arthritis and age have taken their toll on my hunting buddy but he is enjoying retirement and we can still go on walks in the neighborhood for about ten minutes at a time but that is about all I want to do without a gun in my hand anyway. I am a big fan of Cosequin.

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Skybuster

I've not been made aware of Cosequin. I am currently using injections of Adaquan every other week. Very expensive. Are they essentially the same?

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DocE
On ‎10‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 8:00 AM, Hub said:

Using a handled log carrying bag sure saves on the back with old dogs.  Just slip it over their middle.  Also slick floors are tough on old dogs.  The more they are standing on carpet and rugs the better.  I can help on the pills, used to supplement glucosamine and chondroitin, but most food has it in there now day's.

 

Point one : Chondroitin in an older dog only has a 0.03 % effectiveness rate.

Point two : Unless it is a PRESCRIPTION  diet, dog foods are limited to NON-Therapeutic amounts of Glucosamine and Chondroitin and MSM. Adding in a QUALITY Hyaluronic Acid is good too, HA is the substance from which synovial fluid (lubricating fluid in joints) is composed.

Best supplement is Glucosamine Sulfate (not HCl) with MSM at a 2:1 ratio.

.

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WPG Gizmo

Giz will be 14 in Dec his hips are going and he needs help getting up the stairs he is on Glucosamine and a low fat dog food as advised from my Vet so far he is doing ok but his time is getting short.

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henryrski

I've used all os the above and then some. Unfortunately at some point they don't help. You'll know when.

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NC Quailhunter

I don't know what Adaquan is and I can not say if they are the same. We get it at Sam's club and he gets one pill a day. That is after the first six weeks of him getting two a day. It is a Glucosamine and Chondroitin supplement. Inexpensive and easy to give. I am glad that we started him on it and have gotten some more time for him. The inevitable is going to come but I am glad that we have been able to make him more comfortable and able to move around and have a better quality of life.

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MAArcher

Well I got Annie to take Cosequin for a couple weeks but I never got to see an improvement, a week ago she started refusing it, then she stopped eating her regular food (Proplan Performance).  Last few days all she will eat is table scraps.  Tonight she turned her nose up at a big bowl of chicken after just one or two bites.  She's never in her life failed to wolf down every bit of people food ever offered to her, often at the risk of losing your finger, so that can't be a good sign.  A few days ago her eye's started to get droopy and she's been drinking and urinating more than normal.  Crapped in the house twice this week which she's never done.

 

I Had her at the vet yesterday, she's down 10 lbs from this past summer and the tumors that she's had for years around her nipples are getting bigger.  $400 in the usual fecal & urine tests didn't turn anything up except maybe a bladder infection.  Vet had no idea what was up with the eyes, didn't think it was Horner's Syndrome because the pupils were fine and didn't see any damage or trauma.  Going to put her on antibiotics tomorrow.  Vet gave me some pain meds that seem to help her rest a little more peacefully.   Vet seemed more optimistic about her health than I am.  I have to go away for work next week and I'm worried Annie won't be here when I get back....  

 

That's the problem with dogs I guess, they just weren't made to last.  

 

Annie couch 4.jpg

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PartridgeCartridge

She's a really good girl. You've been a really good friend and companion to her and given her everything a fine dog would want or need. Just try to hold on to that thought.

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DonT

I wish you both the best, she looks like a sweet girl who has been loved.  Keep her eating, what ever she will eat and keep her moving , at her pace, when ever she can.  I am in the same boat, my old girl is 13, we are coming out of tight spot now I hope but every time I loose hope she pulls through.  

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Dogwood

Her poor appetite at age 11 despite normal blood and urine panels is not right.  Might consider a chest and abdominal xray to scan for cancer (blood work can be pretty normal regardless) and maybe a resting cortisol and thyroid check just to be sure. Hate to ask you to spend more $ but it would suck to not check off a few more boxes and miss something treatable, the hormonal at least.

 

Oh, and when all else fails . . . prednisone.

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BlacknTan
On 12/15/2017 at 7:05 PM, MAArcher said:

Well I got Annie to take Cosequin for a couple weeks but I never got to see an improvement, a week ago she started refusing it, then she stopped eating her regular food (Proplan Performance).  Last few days all she will eat is table scraps.  Tonight she turned her nose up at a big bowl of chicken after just one or two bites.  She's never in her life failed to wolf down every bit of people food ever offered to her, often at the risk of losing your finger, so that can't be a good sign.  A few days ago her eye's started to get droopy and she's been drinking and urinating more than normal.  Crapped in the house twice this week which she's never done.

 

I Had her at the vet yesterday, she's down 10 lbs from this past summer and the tumors that she's had for years around her nipples are getting bigger.  $400 in the usual fecal & urine tests didn't turn anything up except maybe a bladder infection.  Vet had no idea what was up with the eyes, didn't think it was Horner's Syndrome because the pupils were fine and didn't see any damage or trauma.  Going to put her on antibiotics tomorrow.  Vet gave me some pain meds that seem to help her rest a little more peacefully.   Vet seemed more optimistic about her health than I am.  I have to go away for work next week and I'm worried Annie won't be here when I get back....  

 

That's the problem with dogs I guess, they just weren't made to last.  

 

Annie couch 4.jpg

 

 

I feel for you, but you're doing all that can be done. Dog's know...

 

My ES was on Cosequin and Rimadyl daily for four or five years with great results, but with testing 3 times a year. After we lost the Gordon last Christmas day, the English went downhill fairly rapidly. They were lifelong pals. Grief cannot cause cancer, but perhaps it can become worse in a grieving dog. Anyway, she stopped eating and was losing weight. Blood and urine were perfect. A small mass was detected in her colon area. Further tests confirmed cancer in her colon area. We thought we could treat her with palliative care, so we put her on Prednisone. She would gobble everything, but continued to lose weight. Honestly, the Pred did horrible things to her... Couldn't sleep, couldn't rest, couldn't relax. It was traumatic for us to watch her decline so rapidly. In retrospect, I feel terrible for putting her on the Prednisone and forcing her to endure whatever she was going through. It was my job to protect her, and I think I could have done better.. on April 10 this year, she was euthanized...

 

The dogs know what is happening to them.. I've seen it countless times before, but we try to grab at straws time and again. If I had it to do all over again, I would have let her pass with dignity, instead of forcing her to hang on and take useless drugs just to ease my pain...

 

Prednisone, or something else may work for you.. I pray it works much better than it did for us...

 

My thoughts and prayers are with yourself and Annie... She looks like a good girl.

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john mcg

It has taken Tucker months since Bromley passed to start acting himself.

Toni and I are delighted of late, to have our Tucker back.

 

They are pack animals. Social animals and nobody will convince me otherwise.

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PartridgeCartridge
9 minutes ago, john mcg said:

 

 

They are pack animals. Social animals and nobody will convince me otherwise.

And they look to us as the alpha leader in that pack. And that kind of genuine love and commitment by them defines them as our best friend. It is the ultimate price we pay for loving them and them loving us.

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rudyc

Here is the generic version of Adaquan----

It works just as well for our Dixie and is quite a bit cheaper.

Dixie has had had junk hips from birth and now at 11 she's still hunting a couple of times a week. Only about an hour or so each outing, however, she is still out there and doing what she needs and wants to do.

We also give her Gabapentin every day as well.

 

http://www.allivet.com/p-2652-ichon-5ml-vial.aspx

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