Jump to content
FRIENDLY REMINDER ABOUT HUNTING REPORTS/TOPICS... Read more... ×
MAArcher

Vehicles that go over 200,000 miles?

Recommended Posts

rideold

What were the conditions under which the belt broke?  Was it being driven on the highway or around town at low speed?  The lower the load on the motor when it broke the better chance you have of the motor being OK.  Depending on what you have into the car you might just consider getting a used motor with lower miles.  Still cheaper than another vehicle.

 

My 02 Sequoia has 245,000 on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
garyRI

Tough situation but could they tell if engine trashed if took off the heads? If so the cost of new head gasket could be worth it if you found out you only need a belt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MAArcher
28 minutes ago, mister grouse said:

go to a junk yard and find a used timing belt for nothing.... put it on and see what happens .  Then buy a used suburban if the X T won't run.

The parts aren't expensive, its all labor.  You can get a kit with all belts and waterpump for $200.  You have to tear the front of the motor off.  I'd normally tackle it myself, but I'm not in the right state of mind at the  moment.  I think I'm going to let it sit in the yard until spring and then give it a whirl.  If it works, it will be my sons first car, if not, I'm just out a day and $200.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Biggggybmf
2 hours ago, MAArcher said:

No rust issues with the Toyota's?

 I live in the North East and lets face it rust is always going to be an issue at some point.  My Tacoma has held up pretty well, but it also did have the frame coated.  Have some rust holes on the bumper, couple things have broke due to rust.  However i feel any vehicle that is exposed to weather and road salt is going to rust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
snapt

04 to 05+ jumps to the 4.0 V-6. Had poor luck with that engine, plus most V-8's get better MPG.

 

Obviously a VW GTI with snow tires is the best choice ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Flush

If it was running when it broke, it's hard to imagine there isn't damage. It's possible, but unlikely valves didn't get bent.

 

I agree with others Toyota is probably the safest bet in terms of vehicles that routinely make it over 200k with minimal issues. 

With that said, around here used Toyota 4x4s are priced ridiculously high, as are Subarus.

As a general rule I wouldn't necessarily put GM on the extreme reliability list HOWEVER the 99-06 GM (Chevy and GMC) trucks and SUVs with the 5.3L V8  4x4 powertrain   

have proven to be extremely reliable and long lived, at least in terms of major repairs.  Lots of them driving around with over 300K miles that never had the motors or transmissions touched. 

This would be the Silverado/Sierra, Tahoe/Yukon and the Suburban/Yukon XL. Gas mileage isn't quite as good as a Toyota or Nissan V6 but it's not really that far off, a couple MPG, if that. 

Around here they are WAY cheap than a comparable year and mileage Nissan/Toyota. Just something to consider.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
barna

All of my Hondas had reached the 300K mark just with regular oil changes and routing maintenance like battery, breaks and rotors, maybe an alternator.  My wife racks up the miles on these because of her job in sales, about 40K a year.

 

I drive a Jeep, my last grand Cherokee (1999) hit 250K and the transmission started slipping, this one  (2005) has 230K and is still going strong.  Mainly routine maintenance, just replace the front left hub bearing and had the front drive shaft rebuilt, but after 230K its not a bad life expectancy.

 

Barna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonT

$800 seems a little high to put a belt on to turn the motor over, $500 maybe.  I think they don't have to button it up and run it, 99% of the problem is bent valves I think.  My guess it's $3/3,500 to put a used engine in it and have them put the new belt on it.  You know the condition of this car, so if the miles aren't crazy, good shape and not way behind on maintenance, it may be worth it.

 

The Honda's and Subaru's are good cars but here the used prices are high.  The Toyota's are the sweet spot for price and reliability.  Toyota recalled/replace a lot of frames on the Tundra's and Tacoma's due to rust out.  Side note a Tundra went 1 million miles, with no major repairs. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
salmontogue

Why not consider a reman short block or long block?  The labor will be the same and the replacement is a known quantity that comes with a warranty.  A used engine is an unknown quantity, less money and usually non-warranty or short warranty.  Maximize your results by thinking labor costs that can increase if your replacement engine is a dud.

 

Perk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobman

timing belts suck dumbest idea they’ve come up with

 

ive never had any engine from the big three fail and i run all my wrecks at least 300k

my toyota is almost turing over 400k

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tut

I bought my first 4Runner in 1997.  Kept it till 2010 and replaced it with a new 4Runner.  No issues thus far at 110K.   I had 167K on the first one before I traded it in on the new one.  I think Toyota's are built to last and my 1997 was as tight the day I bought it as it was when I traded it in.  MPG on the new one is 21 MPG on the highway.  More room then the 1997.  No rust on either ever.  Only thing I did on the first one was replace the alternator at about 130K.    Damn thing will just about climb a tree.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kansas Big Dog

Living out here in the hinter lands, there are no Toyota, Subaru, Nissian dealers with in 2 hours. But, there will be a Ford Dealer in almost every county. We have 3 Fords, average mileage of these 3 vehicles is over 200,000. No major repairs on any of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Felix

59fb800db8f88_SCAN064.thumb.jpg.7899458a6ccf33bf074cf383d59d6e5a.jpg

 

Just curious, do all you guys with 200K + change your timing belts at a certain point?  I had one go in a company car that I was driving with 180K miles on it. It toasted the engine.  So, when my personal CRV got to 120K I had a new timing belt put in. It was a lot cheaper than waiting until it breaks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Flush

Most timing belts are supposed to be replaced every 60-90k miles depending on the vehicle. If I have an interference engine in my vehicle I'm pretty careful to follow the recommended replacement to avoid catastrophic failure.

 

If it's a non-interference engine, I'll still replace it, but wont worry so much if I've gone over the recommended mileage.

 

I've noticed a number of manufacturers have actually switched away from belts back to chains, which is nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tut

FWIW, the Toyota 4Runner and Tacoma has a timing chain for models made from 2005 on.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×