Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Brad Eden

      TO THOSE REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UJ   01/06/2018

      To the Guests who have decided to register for Membership. PLEASE add more info than just  "hunting" or "Upland hunting" or "birds" or "outdoors" or similar nebulous terms in the required INTERESTS field. Despite this Boards strong spam filtering it is not bullet proof, so Spam registrations do sneak through. I need an inkling that you are a warm blooded human being not a Spam Bot tagging onto key words. Thank you.
topdog1961

Processing venison ham steaks

Recommended Posts

topdog1961

On reason I like to process my own venison is the care I take with the ham steaks.  I take the time to separate each muscle, trim any connective tissue, and any membranes.  Noting is left but red meat from one muscle.  I then cut approximately ½ inch steaks perpendicular to the grain of the meat.  I make a roast out of the round center muscle, and any muscles too small to cut into steaks go in the grinder pile and end up as brats, sausage, or burger.    

 

My nephews on the other hand, say I’m anal.  They just grab an entire ham and start hacking.  Each “steak” can be from multiple muscles and contains any membranes separating them.  Nor have I found a processor who will take the time to do what I do, so I do it myself.  

 

What say ye? Are you in the nephew/processor/Freddie Krueger camp, or do you do something more surgical like me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clueless1

Used to be in the nephew camp, and just eat around the connective membranes and tissues.  This year's first deer went with separating all the muscles and doing a lot of trimming.  That was yesterday.  Not sure why really, just wanted to try it.  When I got done I looked at the pieces and my son and I decided there wasn't a large enough piece to make a steak out of.  Not sure where I'm headed on the next one yet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden
49 minutes ago, topdog1961 said:

On reason I like to process my own venison is the care I take with the ham steaks.  I take the time to separate each muscle, trim any connective tissue, and any membranes.  Noting is left but red meat from one muscle.  I then cut approximately ½ inch steaks perpendicular to the grain of the meat.  I make a roast out of the round center muscle, and any muscles too small to cut into steaks go in the grinder pile and end up as brats, sausage, or burger.    

 

My nephews on the other hand, say I’m anal.  They just grab an entire ham and start hacking.  Each “steak” can be from multiple muscles and contains any membranes separating them.  Nor have I found a processor who will take the time to do what I do, so I do it myself.  

 

What say ye? Are you in the nephew/processor/Freddie Krueger camp, or do you do something more surgical like me?

 

Exactly as you described. I was taught to separate all the muscle layers in hind quarters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Birdcountry70

Freddie Krueger here. At times I can be completely anal about the way I do something with a perfect end product in mind. Butchering is not one of those times. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Virgil Kane

Surgical like you.  IMHO the only way to butcher a deer.

 

Virgil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden

IMG_0521.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
garyRI

I do "surgical". Specifically on day one of kill gut, skin (in woods), quarter & hang in garage. Day two bone out. Day three package & freeze.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OldSarge

Surgical also. Connective tissue and tallow is where the “gamey” taste comes from. I don’t slice steaks before freezing. Less surface area to freezer burn. I package meal sized chunks of meat and either slice thin and pan cook when thawed or cook chunk whole on grill to medium or less, then wrap in foil for 15 minutes to rest and finish cooking itself. Then slice and eat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bmeador

Just like you do it!!!  I have a portable table that I set up in my kitchen after I debone all the meat from the carcass.  I am anal about getting every scrap of meat, cleaning it thoroughly and cutting it up MY way.  What scraps and cuts that don't make roasts or steaks are ground up.  Some I add beef fat to for burgers, the rest is coarse ground for chili, spaghetti sauce, etc... This year my wife and I are planning to can the first two we put on the ground and just freeze the burger and a few backstrap steaks for the grill.  We usually put up 4 deer annually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topdog1961
12 hours ago, OldSarge said:

Surgical also. Connective tissue and tallow is where the “gamey” taste comes from. I don’t slice steaks before freezing. Less surface area to freezer burn. I package meal sized chunks of meat and either slice thin and pan cook when thawed or cook chunk whole on grill to medium or less, then wrap in foil for 15 minutes to rest and finish cooking itself. Then slice and eat. 

 

That's a good idea, one of those common sense things that's hidden in plain sight. Not cutting the steaks until thawing also leaves the option of making roast if that suits you at the time. I'll do that next deer. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
charlo slim
17 minutes ago, topdog1961 said:

That's a good idea, one of those common sense things that's hidden in plain sight. Not cutting the steaks until thawing also leaves the option of making roast if that suits you at the time. I'll do that next deer.

 

Yep.  Grilling the entire muscle tract works great, once you get the hang of it.  Seared nicely on the outside, but perfectly medium rare on the interior. Much easier to do that on a thicker piece of meat than on a thin steak, IME. Then slice fairly thin across the grain at a slight diagonal at the table. Many of the tracts are about right size for grilling on smaller deer (like the ones I shoot).  On a larger animal, you can split the entire tract lengthwise (with the grain)  and produce 2 "grillin' chunks".  Enjoy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OldSarge

Mr. Slim nailed it. Sear the outside and the inside will be perfect once it sets for a few minutes. That's what I meant by letting it rest in tin foil for 15 minutes or so. A 8" chunk of backstrap or hind quarter rubbed with olive oil and seasoning grilled in this manner and sliced to your desired thickness will melt in your mouth.

 

One other little tip when cutting thin steaks for the pan (philly cheese steak style) is to cut the meat when it is about half frozen yet. The meat is easier to handle that way and doesn't try to squish away from you when the piece gets smaller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MNice

Surgical....My grandfather was a butcher and all 9 of their children grew up in the meat market so I had many mentors and also spent time in the shop with my grandfather as a child. That would be called daycare today. I'm not proposing it's the correct approach but it's the "only" way in my family.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MAArcher

I like to take a foot long length of backstrap, brush it with olive oil and coat it in Montreal Steak Seasoning.  Then I put a cast iron griddle on the grill, smooth side up, and heat the grill as hot as it will go.  Throw the backstrap on and let it sear for a few minutes, turn it over and do the other side for a little longer than the first side because the grill cooled a tad with the meat in there and opening/closing.  Then I roll it to do the sides that didn't hit the pan.  Then I shut the heat off and let it sit for just a few to cook through a little more depending on how thick it is.  If I timed everything right it comes out a little more rare than medium rare.  I make sure everything else is on the table and the wife and kids are seated so everyone's ready when it hits the table hot.  Mmmmm. Now I'm hungry for lunch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shoot-straight

i have one butcher that cuts through the bone steaks from the hindquarters. i do like them- no issues with gameyness or anything. kinda nice to flip a big steak on the grill. 

 

i try to kill a young deer each year and simply quarter it. i bone them out and smoke them. its excellent. 

 

otherwise, yes i like to do as others have suggested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×