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topdog1961

Processing venison ham steaks

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mshowman
On 11/6/2017 at 3:30 PM, Birdcountry70 said:

Freddie Krueger here. At times I can be completely anal about the way I do something with a perfect end product in mind. Butchering is not one of those times. 

Yep, that. 

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MAArcher
On 11/6/2017 at 4:45 PM, Brad Eden said:

IMG_0521.JPG

Thats a great picture, it would be made even better if it was panned back a pit so you could see two smiling guys, cold beers, along with the makings of a lot of great memories and meals laid out nice on the table nice like that..  Butchering a deer with some tunes, beers and friends is one of the finer things in life.

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SODAKer

I hang with the skin on for 2 weeks in the meat cooler then debone, separate the muscle groups, trim all silver skin and connective tissue off, and vacuum pack all cuts.  

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topdog1961
3 hours ago, SODAKer said:

I hang with the skin on for 2 weeks in the meat cooler then debone, separate the muscle groups, trim all silver skin and connective tissue off, and vacuum pack all cuts.  

 

That's exactly what my family in KY does. It makes some very tender steaks, but I can't get over the fact that the exposed flesh has some mold on it after 2 weeks. At least theirs did when I helped them process. They just trimmed it off  

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garyRI
20 hours ago, SODAKer said:

hang with the skin on

The hide holds in heat. If hanging with the skin on improved quality I'd expect some commercial butchers to do it too. Where I mostly hunt it isn't a requirement to check in the carcass and the attached shows what comes with me in any vehicle I'm in. When I shoot a deer it gets gutted right away then I go get the pack basket, hoist the animal up, get it skinned/quartered and in muslin bags where the animal dropped. I look to take out the lungs so the deer always bleed out. Any venison I process has no "wild" (livery) flavor. It takes crows & coyotes 4 days tops to clean up the site. Only evidence of the kill is some loose hair.

go bag.JPG

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Clueless1

So here is what I'm left with.  The only one thick enough to make steaks across the grain is the sirloin.  So do you only get four packages of steaks for the grill on an average size deer?  Going 'Freddie Krueger' I got at least 8-10 packages of steaks off each deer.  What does everyone do with the top and bottom round?  Got any good recipes?  

IMG_0065.JPG

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MAArcher
On 12/4/2017 at 2:55 PM, garyRI said:

The hide holds in heat. If hanging with the skin on improved quality I'd expect some commercial butchers to do it too. Where I mostly hunt it isn't a requirement to check in the carcass and the attached shows what comes with me in any vehicle I'm in. When I shoot a deer it gets gutted right away then I go get the pack basket, hoist the animal up, get it skinned/quartered and in muslin bags where the animal dropped. I look to take out the lungs so the deer always bleed out. Any venison I process has no "wild" (livery) flavor. It takes crows & coyotes 4 days tops to clean up the site. Only evidence of the kill is some loose hair.

go bag.JPG

Wow.  You sir are the man with the plan!  I like it.

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Brad Eden

The hide on also keeps the meat from drying out. If I skin and quarter but don't cut that day I wrap the quarters in plastic bags and hang. Otherwise the meat develops a brown dry layer that needs to be trimmed off.

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topdog1961
On December 6, 2017 at 2:30 PM, Clueless1 said:

So here is what I'm left with.  The only one thick enough to make steaks across the grain is the sirloin.  So do you only get four packages of steaks for the grill on an average size deer?  Going 'Freddie Krueger' I got at least 8-10 packages of steaks off each deer.  What does everyone do with the top and bottom round?  Got any good recipes?  

IMG_0065.JPG

 

That's pretty much what I get, plus the backstraps.  But they can all be cut across the grain to make steaks, they are not to thin. I believe the one you identified as sirloin is the round center muscle I've always put up as roast. I used cut the rest into steaks but after OldSarge's post I put them away in meal size chunks on our last deer so we can use them as roasts or cut into steaks upon thawing. All the rest of the ham goes into the burger pile to be made into snack sticks, brats, sausge or very little burger. The sticks and brats are by far the favorites of my extended family and the land owners that I give meat to. So my immediate family always has enough steaks even being surgical after the 3-4 deer my son and I average each season. And we enjoy them much more than if I went Freddie Krueger.  

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charlo slim
27 minutes ago, topdog1961 said:

 But they can all be cut across the grain to make steaks, they are not to thin

 

Agreed.  Also, if the notion is simply to have larger individual steaks, you can just cut them (across the grain of course) about twice as thick as you want.  Then "butterfly" them - simply cut each individual piece part way through. across the grain.  The uncut portion will be the same dimension as the thickness of the individual "wings" of the piece.  Then just spread the piece out and   give it a light whack with the flat of a cleaver, or even the palm of your hand.  VOILA!  your steak is now twice the size that it was.

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Clueless1

I'll try it.  Although these do look thin.  You guys must shoot bigger deer than me:D

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