Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Brad Eden

      WELCOME NEW UJ MEMBERS   06/25/2017

      It seems the word is out and UJ is enjoying a steady stream of newly Registered Members. Welcome to all of you, and we are all looking forward to your positive participation. I strongly suggest you review the Board Guidelines that have been in place since 2002. The most significant thing being that UJ is a NO POLITICS BOARD. LInk:  UJ BOARD GUIDELINES   Also UJ stays afloat mainly through Member Donations. Once a Donation is made you are placed in the Contributing Member Group with extra Priviliges. I am getting very few new Donations so hopefully this will spur that on a bit. Link:  New Members/Donations/Priviliges
blanked

Question for the chukar hunters

Recommended Posts

dogrunner
5 hours ago, Gyrfolco said:

Added one video twice and couldn't figure out how to delete it.

Sounds like you  need the oxygen mask.   When its cold is it harder on your lungs? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fishnfowler

I'm 53 and hunt a lot of chukar.  I've been out three times this week alone.  I quit posting PE of my trips due to the hassle of photos, (I'm no Hartman or Gordon).  I'll hunt two days in a row with the same dog if circumstances demand it, but take it slow and carefully plan the hunts to conserve the dog.  More often, I'll give the dog a break on the second day and hit it on the third.  My dog will wear out before I do, and her feet will wear out before she does.  I boot my dog for multiple day adventures, but not for single day events.  I hike what is needed to get the birds.  There are times I'll put 2,000 vertical in the bag just to get to the birds, but it isn't often.  The old adage about finding birds at the same elevation hasn't panned out for me.  I find the them all over the elevation spectrum.  There are places that have been very consistent for me and I seem to find birds there all season long regardless of weather.  I tend to plan my hunt in advance with variations in how much elevation I climb based on bird contacts.  Occasionally the devil makes me go down, up, down, and up again, but I generally punish them for it.  My teenage children have become leaders rather than followers, they are very fast early in the day, but give me enough daylight and I'll punish them too.  I've found that people who are new to the sport are intimidated by the elevation and terrain and believe that intimidation effects their performance.  Once someone has been to the same place a couple of times, the hills aren't as steep or as tall.  It is all a matter of perspective.  It is much like driving a new road, it seems to take longer than one you have been on multiple times. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Meridiandave

A couple of ideas.

 

#1. Pick good lines up the mountain. In other words don't just trip up the steepest part of the mountain.   Find ridges  that will let you cover more area.  Ridges tend to be less steep and the dogs can smell the birds that are over the edge if the breeze is right.  Sidehilling sucks.

 

#2.  Google earth is your friend.  Use it to plan out hints.  Look for rock outcrops, with shelfs above.  Especially if there is springs around..  

 

3.  There is a lot of chest bumping that goes on with Chukar hunters.   I am a big guy, 6'3" and around 265 and I still do 5 or 7 miles a hunt.  The biggest limiting factor for me is the basalt,  it can kill yours and your dogs feet.

 

4.  You can.break up your days, by hunting different species.  The area I have done most of.my chukar.huting this year has quail, Huns, and even a few pheasants within two miles of the chukar hill.  On Friday,  I did a hunt hint where we bagged pheasants, quail and Huns.  This ground was primarily flat.

 

5.  Find areas where roads get to elevation.  Don't give up elevation if you can avoid it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gary kebo

Here is a issue I never see mentioned when newbies ask about chukar hunting,

 

Falling ! If you hunt chukar long enough it is not a matter of If it is when. For me I hate it when I have to traverse areas of rocks and large boulders of various sizes. You never know when the rock you step on no matter how big is going to shift on you. The other obvious times are rushing to your dog on point,when you are tired and going downhill at the end of a hunt with your Flatlander ankles and feet.

my worst fall was of course side saddling across a long stretch of large boulders and next thing I know is I am down. I don't even remember even falling and luckily was only bruised up. The worst thing that happened is put a dent on the end of my shotgun barrel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ThreeDogs

If your not regularly hunting Chukar multiple days will kill you and your dog. Cardiac conditioning is the smallest part of it. What gets you is the constant rolling your ankles and knees even slightly it stretches and pulls all of those tendons in your feet and legs the constant side hilling and up and down. I can’t overstate how bad this will be on ankles and knees that haven’t been broken in to it.

 

Im 40 I can do two days in a row but three days later I can hardly walk. I mostly hunt every week once a week now for Chukar. 5 days after a hunt I feel great and I’m ready to do it again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gyrfolco
18 hours ago, dogrunner said:

Sounds like you  need the oxygen mask.   When its cold is it harder on your lungs? 

No, just when it's steep;-) And it seems like it's always steep getting to the birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scrappy

Most of my chukar spots require about 30-45 minutes of good strenuous hiking before we get into birds.  For me that is doable, even if it involves significant elevation gain.  As others have said, slow and steady hiking uphill, picking good lines, will eat up elevation quicker than you realize.  I used to have a  spot that took roughly one and half hours of hard hiking before you would even glimpse a chukar.  I stopped hunting that particular spot (even though there are always birds there) when I realized I simply hated the hike back to the truck.  It just became an unbearable slog, with sore feet and hips.

 

At 48, I am fortunate that I can still do two significant days in row of 8-12 miles, but I do my best to keep in shape year round.  My Scrappy dog seems to handle two days in a row just fine as well.  For this past veteran's weekend, Scrappy did 27 miles on Friday and 33 miles on Saturday, with no limping or soreness on Sunday.

 

One last comment,  my dad accompanies me on a couple chukar and grouse hunts every year (as well as a couple weekends mule deer hunting) and goes the distance every time (8-10 miles) with no apparent difficulty.  He turns 75 in a couple of months.  Of course, he either jogs 3-4 miles, or bikes 10 miles, everyday.  It takes a conscious effort to stay that active at his age, but it pays huge dividends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI Outdoor Nut
On ‎11‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 10:16 AM, NVChukarChaser said:

Here’s is yesterday’s hunt which I would say wasn’t too long. Ended up with 4 birds. 

806B1737-40FC-4E50-A297-6BF7A21FAD32.png

The most I have done grouse hunting in some of my hilly areas in WI chasing ruffed grouse was 32 floors.  And it is not like you didn't walk many miles either.  I guess I am just a flatlander.  Impressed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SaltCityJeff
6 hours ago, ThreeDogs said:

I can’t overstate how bad this will be on ankles and knees that haven’t been broken in to it.

 

Yep - ThreeDogs was with me last year when I destroyed my knee (patella injury). It took 4 months to heal. Even the single days hunts can be messy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sage Hen

I'm 65 and I no longer hunt some good spots that are just too much vertical climbing. I do still have quite a few places that I can drive part way up and climb to bird levels. I like to think of my climbing just like I would in my rig, slow down, I'm retired and in no hurry, take shorter steps, just like down shifting each step does less work and puts less strain on the knees and ankles. That said once a week is plenty for this senior. I like it enough to try to take care of myself and don't plan on stopping any time soon. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
P.V.Chukar

I will be 61 in two weeks. Don't have to travel to hunt Chukar so I hunt three to five days a week. There is a huge difference in being in shape and being in Chukar shape. You could go work out seven days a week for a year and Chukar hunt for two days and wonder why you wasted a year working out. The muscles you use and the balance you need can't be duplicated anywhere except on a Chukar hill. It takes me about ten hunts to get in Chukar shape. As I get older I realize that each year I loose more agility. I can still hunt like I did when I was thirty. Just takes me twice as long now.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hunski

Guys,

This is an interesting thread and glad you all are getting it done. I am 56 now and have had a passion for chukar a long time. They certainly demand fitness and can be addicting. I track this sort of thing for each hunt. I usually am good for 2 hard days, then I need a break.

Couple observation this year:

 I purchased a Sunnto watch to track vertical gained and shots, and all of the birds (sharptail, Huns, and chukar) have been between 6500 and 7500 feet in elevation.

The dogs will travel 3 to 4 times what I do, and I feel lucky when their feet do not break down. On the hunt below I harvested 4 birds. 

 

 

image.thumb.png.8623cd1c9d266de8f260f86d235dfff1.pngT 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wildcat
On 11/11/2017 at 9:44 AM, mister grouse said:

Object of the hunt plan is , if at all possible, to use experience and observation to start at or near the elevations you expect to find birds (or have found them in similar covers recently) and contour at that elevation until you have to adjust to actual findings on the ground for that day.   Its surprising how many times finding the right elevation can lead to multiple coveys generally along that elevation or other geographic feature.   Find a road, or some access that gets you started on target elevation.

 

 Ive only done the bottom to top thing  a couple of times , and that was when i was much younger , better conditioned , and not too chukar smart, as I was literally trying to figure it out by myself.  Very generally, Once you push birds to the top  by going straight up or climbing angling severely up constantly the birds are going to either fly down over you which typically can be a hail mary overhead with a hail mary downhill following, or fly out to parts unknown just before you crest out and you may only hear them and never see them. 

 This^^^^^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okhotnik

I'm older and supposedly wiser now and after multiple hip replacements ( i just dont have the balance I used to after the surgeries and would fall quite a bit)I use a sling on the shotgun and collapsable hiking poles to access my chukar spots, side hilling and walking on the loose basalt rocks. Once I get up top to area that holds birds I put my poles in my day pack . i enjoy the amazing views once I get up top. My dog can handle 2 days without boots but i hike with her year round in areas that hold chukar so her feet are tough.

 

Sometimes will find birds down lower in hotter weather around water or after a heavy snow. I usually encounter huns about halfway up the steep hills in the areas i hunt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cbass

I try to find spots that you can start your walk at elevation rather than starting at the bottom. Saves energy, but also time. If I'm in prime cover for the whole day rather than spending 1-2 hours getting to that cover, you are looking at a significant percentage of your time spent not hunting. More time hunting=more bird encounters. This isn't always possible though...

 

I've always thought a 3 day trip was perfect. Day one you have lots of energy, day two you are working out the soreness from day one, then day 3 you are starting to find your groove. It seems to be the same for my dog. Day 2 is always slower going than day 3 for him. Granted we are both relatively young, me at 32 and him at 4. 

 

Typically I'm doing 9-14 miles and he's doing 25-40 miles depending on the terrain. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×