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      WELCOME NEW UJ MEMBERS   06/25/2017

      It seems the word is out and UJ is enjoying a steady stream of newly Registered Members. Welcome to all of you, and we are all looking forward to your positive participation. I strongly suggest you review the Board Guidelines that have been in place since 2002. The most significant thing being that UJ is a NO POLITICS BOARD. LInk:  UJ BOARD GUIDELINES   Also UJ stays afloat mainly through Member Donations. Once a Donation is made you are placed in the Contributing Member Group with extra Priviliges. I am getting very few new Donations so hopefully this will spur that on a bit. Link:  New Members/Donations/Priviliges
hunter177

30" Barrels For Upland Hunting

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hunter177

I currently have a Mossberg International Silver Reserve II with 28" barrels that I use for my bird hunting. I have a Browning Citori CX with 30" barrels on layaway. The main use for the Browning will be singles trap and sporting clays but possibly some upland hunting too. Are 30" too long or is that good for an O/U with many uses. Personally I can't see that 2" longer will make that much difference in weight or swing. Any thoughts would be appreciated, thanks.

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jeff88

Maybe because of the condition of my sight as I get a bit older, longer barrels seem better to me.  Both my O/Us are 26", if I added another double it would be 28 or 29", 30 seems fine too.  For an auto or pump, I'd go with 26" providing a 29 to 30" sight plane.

 

 

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greg jacobs
1 hour ago, jeff88 said:

Maybe because of the condition of my sight as I get a bit older, longer barrels seem better to me.  Both my O/Us are 26", if I added another double it would be 28 or 29", 30 seems fine too.  For an auto or pump, I'd go with 26" providing a 29 to 30" sight plane.

 

 

I think the same. I have a Browning white lightning with 26" tubes and I like it for quail. It swings fast. But I shoot my old 1100 better for pheasant and chukar. My 1100 is at least 6" longer. I see the bird fine, the gun not so well.

My dad's shooting declined as he got older. He was sure that his gun didn't fit him anymore. The only thing that had changed was his eyesight.

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Urban_Redneck

I think it's mostly a matter of weight rather than length, when 30" bbls are too long, 26" is usually too. That said, I know I'm just not sharp and fast after a couple of hours of carrying an 8lb gun.

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gunsrus

A 6lb , 30'' sub gauge is the cat's meow !

 

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Greg Hartman

Bbl length is just one of many factors that play into Moment Of Inertia (MOI), which, along with weight, determines how a gun "handles".  MOI is essentially a measurement of how much force applied to one end it takes to get an unmoving gun turning around its center point at a certain speed.  Everything else being equal, the more weight out toward the ends of the gun, the slower the MOI (more force needed to get it moving); the more weight toward the center of the gun, the faster the MOI (less force needed to get it moving).  This is a gross over-generalization, but guns with slower MOI are preferred for the target sports, which require a very steady swing on targets that can't suddenly change direction mid-flight; and guns with faster MOI are preferred for field use, to allow the gun to quickly change direction with the bird.  Obviously, reason must rule - a gun with too fast an MOI will "feel" whippy and be hard to control.  A gun with too slow an MOI will feel like swinging a 2x4.

 

I have a rather deliberate shooting style and thus prefer game guns that don't have a very quick MOI.  I find that going from, say, 26" bbls to 30" bbls slows MOI a bit without adding much overall weight to a game gun.  Maybe this is why I like 30" bbls on game guns, especially light small bores.  To me, 30" is the sweet spot - more than 30" feels clumsy to me in thick woods.  I shoot 28" bbls well enough, 30" bbls a tiny bit better.  I don't shoot 26" bbls well at all.  Bbls length certainly isn't the be-all and end-all, but it does matter, especially on longer shots. 

 

Obviously, I am talking about break-open guns - you can usually subtract about 2" from bbl length on guns with long receivers, like pumps and autos, to get to the same MOI result.  For example, a Beretta a400 with 28" bbls "feels" a lot like an O/U with 30" bbls. 

 

I can use 32" and 34" bbls (or equivalent) with good effect on targets - but they feel like they should be mounted on wheels for upland use.

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Jakeismydog2

I am a big fan of 30” barrels for field guns. My main field gun now is a 5# 14oz Remington 31L 12 gauge with a 30” barrel. IMO A gun that light would be tough to shoot consistently without the long barrel to give you the MOI Greg was talking about. 

 

 

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studdog

I'm a small person but do like longer overall length.  I shoot two 28 gauges one SXS and one O/U with 29 " and shoot them both well.  Seem smoother swinging than shorter barrels. In my younger years of swamp crawling for grouse I liked shorter barrels to help get threw the thick cover but there wasn't much swing threw on shots. 

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gaberdeen

I have 30's on my LC Smith. I seem to shoot it better than any of my other guns although it could be the stock fits me best.

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troutchops

Not a fan for a bird gun. I know longer barrels are the current fad. It feels too long for me in the woods, ok for open fields. My 2cents...

Metrogun-Shotgun-Suppressor-64-inch-ENDO-upgrade[1].jpg

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Greg Hartman
45 minutes ago, troutchops said:

Not a fan for a bird gun. I know longer barrels are the current fad. It feels too long for me in the woods, ok for open fields. My 2cents...

Metrogun-Shotgun-Suppressor-64-inch-ENDO-upgrade[1].jpg

 

:D

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Dogwood
1 hour ago, Greg Hartman said:

Bbl length is just one of many factors that play into Moment Of Inertia (MOI), which, along with weight, determines how a gun "handles".  MOI is essentially a measurement of how much force applied to one end it takes to get an unmoving gun turning around its center point at a certain speed.  Everything else being equal, the more weight out toward the ends of the gun, the slower the MOI (more force needed to get it moving); the more weight toward the center of the gun, the faster the MOI (less force needed to get it moving).  This is a gross over-generalization, but guns with slower MOI are preferred for the target sports, which require a very steady swing on targets that can't suddenly change direction mid-flight; and guns with faster MOI are preferred for field use, to allow the gun to quickly change direction with the bird.  Obviously, reason must rule - a gun with too fast an MOI will "feel" whippy and be hard to control.  A gun with too slow an MOI will feel like swinging a 2x4.

 

I have a rather deliberate shooting style and thus prefer game guns that don't have a very quick MOI.  I find that going from, say, 26" bbls to 30" bbls slows MOI a bit without adding much overall weight to a game gun.  Maybe this is why I like 30" bbls on game guns, especially light small bores.  To me, 30" is the sweet spot - more than 30" feels clumsy to me in thick woods.  I shoot 28" bbls well enough, 30" bbls a tiny bit better.  I don't shoot 26" bbls well at all.  Bbls length certainly isn't the be-all and end-all, but it does matter, especially on longer shots. 

 

Obviously, I am talking about break-open guns - you can usually subtract about 2" from bbl length on guns with long receivers, like pumps and autos, to get to the same MOI result.  For example, a Beretta a400 with 28" bbls "feels" a lot like an O/U with 30" bbls. 

 

I can use 32" and 34" bbls (or equivalent) with good effect on targets - but they feel like they should be mounted on wheels for upland use.

 

This is the best description ever concerning MOI.

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Larry Brown

Short barrels seem to be preferred--or seem to have been, back when shorter barrels in general were more generally found on shotguns of all kinds (especially including skeet guns)--by grouse and woodcock hunters.  I've run across a few Ithaca doubles, I think all 20's or 28's, with factory 24" barrels.  (And I know Brad has one of the Citori Upland Specials with 24" barrels.)  They obviously reduce weight compared to longer barrels.  But the theory seemed to be, for guys chasing woods birds, that you'd be less likely to whack the barrels into a tree than 28" (let alone 30"!) barrels.  Well, I've whacked enough trees trying to get on a grouse or woodcock that I'm pretty sure I'm way over my limit.  And until this year, I frequently carried a double with 26" barrels, and can't recall ever having used anything longer than 28" in the woods.  (Open country birds . . . I have used guns with 30" barrels on them.)  This year, I carried a 28ga with 29" barrels exclusively--and I could not determine that it was any more of a hindrance than shorter-barreled guns.  If I did whack a tree, it didn't seem to be with the last 2-3" of barrel.  And at 5 3/4#, the gun was no chore to carry.

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Jazz4Brazo

The one thing missing in Hartman's post is the follow on of slow to start MOI on long barrels = slow to stop...i.e. helps with follow through. Short barrels are great for fast point and shoot to a spot (if you can pick the right interception point quickly...easy on going away birds not so easy on crossers) but they are more difficult to keep moving so you need to be more conscious of maintaining follow through...longer barrels just feel better/smoother :-)

 

 

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GB Jack

I shoot 28 barrels fine in the grouse woods, anything longer, I domt

think I wouid. I wouid prefer to shoot 26 inch barrels,

but,  I simply don’t shoot them as well 

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