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      WELCOME NEW UJ MEMBERS   06/25/2017

      It seems the word is out and UJ is enjoying a steady stream of newly Registered Members. Welcome to all of you, and we are all looking forward to your positive participation. I strongly suggest you review the Board Guidelines that have been in place since 2002. The most significant thing being that UJ is a NO POLITICS BOARD. LInk:  UJ BOARD GUIDELINES   Also UJ stays afloat mainly through Member Donations. Once a Donation is made you are placed in the Contributing Member Group with extra Priviliges. I am getting very few new Donations so hopefully this will spur that on a bit. Link:  New Members/Donations/Priviliges
brushbuster

A Mid Season Review

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Don Steese

Sometimes you'll come upon what's left of an old stone fence that goes on for quite a distance and think about the backbreaking sweat that must have gone into building it!  Not many people owned front end loaders back then! I have a repair job to do and then I'm loading up the dog. Perhaps we'll stumble on just such a place. 

 

I was just thinking of how things affect us in different ways. If I'm out in the middle of nowhere and run into an old stone fence, it's a delightful find whereas if I stumble over some rusted barbed wire, it's an irritant! Funny.

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Irishwhistler

Great PE - well done.👌

 

Mikey 🍀

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Skybuster

Thanks Dennis, well done. I'd be curious to know what state requires a back tag for bird hunting where you are. Here in WI tags were required only for the 10day deer gun season.... up until now. Our DNR decided they were no longer necessary. This change is not popular in some circles. 

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PartridgeCartridge
9 minutes ago, Skybuster said:

Thanks Dennis, well done. I'd be curious to know what state requires a back tag for bird hunting where you are. Here in WI tags were required only for the 10day deer gun season.... up until now. Our DNR decided they were no longer necessary. This change is not popular in some circles. 

NY still requires it I believe.

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brushbuster

PC is right NY still requires a  backtag to be displayed.  PA does not but I put it in there to remind me that I have them.

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Don Steese
4 hours ago, brushbuster said:

PC is right NY still requires a  backtag to be displayed.  PA does not but I put it in there to remind me that I have them.

 

 

Good idea Dennis!  I put mine in my wallet and then leave it in my other pants!! Your idea is much better!!

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Field Grade

Glad we had a chance to get out a couple times, Dennis, it's always a pleasure to hunt with you. The early season was a bit frustrating, sweating buckets and getting scarred up in the  nasty tangles while hunting in a tshirt. Hot and dry is a hassle.

 

So far, like other folks mention, November has been more kind. It's been alot colder -- down into the low 20s some nights -- and some heavy rain has fallen, erasing the near-drought conditions. The grouse seem to be a bit more concentrated in the hawthorns and along sunny hillsides with spring seeps and greens. I think they feed much heavier, and are thus more active, in colder weather broken up by storms. In the hot dry weather I think they lay up in the pines or swamp edges and only come down around dawn or just before dark.

 

So it's great that normal colder fall weather is finally here.

 

Look forward to getting together with you and some of the other folks on the board after NY deer season...or after the first week, anyway.

 

-Rob J.

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MNice
On 11/13/2017 at 6:14 PM, bobman said:

what is a spoil pile?

In the mining regions of the Great Lakes States and Canada, "spoil piles" are most often rock piles left over from mining exploration. You'll see them on small farms outside the farm belt too from land clearing and or animal grazing. 

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DennisMcFeely

Awesome

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Field Grade

ps, Dennis and I had a few entertaining moments in the grouse covers this fall.

 

One morning a couple weeks ago, the grouse were running ahead of the dog and blowing out wild. The thickets were wet from a light misty rain and we were getting soaked.

 

Dennis and I climbed out of a slash-choked ravine onto a logging road.

 

My Britt was still 50 yards or so down in the thick ravine, and from the way her bell was starting and stopping, it sounded like she was working a running bird.

 

I moved down the logging road to try to get a little in front of the dog, to try to get the bird between us.

 

But the grouse was farther ahead than I figured, and it popped out from the underbrush 40 yards up, dashing along with that little wind-up-toy gait that mountain chickens have. Like Dennis says, a running grouse can cover almost as much ground as a pheasant.

 

As I approached, the bird ducked into a thorny swale. The dog caught up, slammed on point and a few seconds later the bird blew out within range but too low for a shot. The bird sailed back down deep into the ravine.

 

I muttered about yet another grouse giving us the slip. Then I turned on my heel and trudged away, whistling to release the dog.

 

She did not budge.

 

I whistled again a bit louder, then shouted to her that the bird was gone...time to break off and find another one.

 

Chloe stood point.

 

Frustrated, I started walking back to inform her one more time that the bird was gone and we were moving on.

 

As I did so, a second grouse exploded from a greenbrier clump 10 feet off her nose, and out of complete luck I spun and dropped it with the first barrel.

 

The dog trotted up, grabbed the bird and spit it out at my feet with the coldest, most heartbreaking look you could ever imagine from an otherwise soul-eyed Brittany. Then she ran off to Dennis as if to say, "let's lose this dimwit."

 

I stood there frozen for a long moment as cold rain dripped down my back.

 

"Yeah, I meant for that to happen," I shouted to Dennis, not all that convincingly. Ever the gentleman, Dennis complimented me on the shot and we had a good laugh at another unpredictable grouse saga.

 

Chloe never looked back, bounding up into an upper thicket.

 

So you all know what I'm saying: Trust the Dog. And keep a shred of your dignity intact.

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