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topdog1961

The fun isn't over when you pull the trigger.

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topdog1961

I've heard that said a lot, but I greatly enjoy the anticipation and excitement of retrieving hit game. At least as long as it is not at night and I gotta get up at 4 for work. My 30 something nephew just texted me he hit a buck this morning. The arrow hit a twig just enough to wobble it so it didn't hit straight on. Only got about 12 inches penetration at back of chest, and the arrow came out without broadhead within 30 yards, where he first saw bright blood on ground. It then crossed a deep creek. We're gonna give it plenty of time before we start looking. Now if we find it, that's where the fun ends. How about you, do you enjoy the hunt after the hunt? 

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Dakota Dogman

Honestly no.  I want the animal to drop straight down if at all possible.  If not a want to watch it plow a 40 yard trough.  The last thing I want is the wonder if a wounded animal is out there suffering & will I find it or not.  Just me.  

 

That said, good luck!  I do hope you find it, and it is "right there".  

 

God Bless, 

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PartridgeCartridge

Chit happens when you hunt big game. It isn't an ideal scenario and hopefully you'll find him piled up close.

 

But if you don't or can't find him, don't be too hard on yourself. Chit happens.

 

JMO

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OldSarge

Unfortunately, deer shot with archery gear sometimes run a bit before expiring due to arrows killing by hemorrhage. Poorly hit animals can go quite a ways. I try to take good shots at the correct angles but sometimes stuff happens, as in this case where the arrow hit a twig. I do not enjoy having to track a wounded deer, but I do enjoy finding them at the end of the trail.  I have tracked a bunch of them, including the 7 point I had to let lay overnight this year. Perfect hit but lost trail due to death run and a little rain. I hope you find your nephew’s deer. 

 

On on a similar note, my wife and I each filled our MI deer tags yesterday with our rifles. I got a nice 5 pt, and she shot a wide 4 forkhorn. Bang flop in both cases. No track job.

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topdog1961

I too like a quick kill. But the skills honed through experience tracking arrow shot deer are fulfilling when they work. Sucks when they don't. Still waiting. I also like looking for someone else's deer more than mine. Less guilt if it doesn't work out. 

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OldSarge

I agree about feeling a sense of fulfillment when I find a deer after a difficult track job. I sometimes get calls from friends and relatives to help track their deer also. Every trail is a little different so I learn a bit more every time. It is a skill that has been earned through experience that I’m kind of proud of. 

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Brad Eden

Of course everyone prefers a quick kill and a short search if any.

 

But to answer your question. Yes, I like blood tracking if required. It's just plain exciting, nerve wracking yes, if you were the shooter. Much more fun if helping someone else. They are usually a wreck, so it's up to you to be the voice of reason. Blood tracking requires woodsmanship, diligence, patience and and understanding of a deers anatomy so you have an idea of what type blood you are looking at. 

 

And you need to spine a deer with an arrow for it to drop, and then typically it requires another arrow so it doesn't suffer too long. That's the scenario with the 8 pt I shot with bow a month ago. Otherwise they will run, sometimes a short distance sometimes a long distance and some you never recover. (Just like Upland birds) Thats hunting with any weapon. If unacceptable then a person should simply stop hunting. IMO.

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MAArcher

12" of penetration can be great.  As the deer runs through the brush its hitting the protruding arrow and that broadhead is in the chest cavity cutting things up like Cuisinart. 

 

I hate the drag.  Most hunter injuries isn't falling out of a tree stand or taking friendly fire, its having a heart attack as we are gutting and dragging.   I love to track if the conditions are good, meaning you're not racing against rain coming or having to go to work or getting the deer on ice because its 80 degrees out or faced with leaving it for the night in coyote infested territory.  I also hate the dread if the trail heads further and further from a road and you know the drag might end up being longer than you can do yourself.  I have one spot where if the deer doesn't go down fast enough and makes it over the hill, which is basically a several hundred foot cliff covered in rose thorns, you're looking at a long night of hard labor loosing some blood yourself.  I'd prefer they all run over to the back of the truck and die, which has actually happened to me once.

 

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shoot-straight

i would not worry too much yet. bright red is usually lung, but could also be muscle. if its a chest shot, hard to think he just hit muscle.  deep red is usually liver. 

 

the anticipation of the blood trail walk is exciting. hopefully its an INCREASING amount as you go, which makes things easier, and makes the anticipation of finding the animal greater. less blood along the way- nothing more disheartening. also nothing worse than crawling on your hands and knees looking for little spots of blood on leaves at night. 

 

just shot a deer last night w bow no pass through. not as much penetration as i would have liked either. no blood in immediate area. it was a quartering away, low chest cavity shot from about 20' up at 15 yds. i backed out, worried a bit. had dinner then my wife and i went in to look. didnt find blood for about 50 yds- but then it came in large, increasing amounts, bright red and the deer was 30 yds further.  

 

i love helping friends out on game recovery, but the blood tracking dogs are pretty darn good at what they do. 

 

 

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topdog1961

Better safe than sorry I guess. He only went about 20 yards beyond where my great-nephew last saw him. A happy ending with a really nice buck, with a really big body. This is a fine young man, a very hard worker and can do just about anything he sets his mind to. I'm glad I was there to share the moment, another great hunting memory with him. I'm sure he's glad I was there to help drag and load into the Ranger. 

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shoot-straight

awesome job!

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Brad Eden
1 hour ago, MAArcher said:

I hate the drag.  

 

I actually use to like it. Especially over snow for obvious reasons.

 

This was a buck that went over just over 200 lbs dressed and I was a much younger man. I dragged him off a mountain using the drag rope and stick. I'd walk 50 yards ahead clearing the brush and logs, leave my coat gear and rifle, go back and drag the deer to that spot, repeat, repeat.

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This was the Spike I shot last weekend. Half the size of the buck above. I only dragged him 100 yards and my bum left knee ached and I was beat. Age. Luckily my hunting buddy was in his way with a wheeled cart.

 

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I just bought one of those ice fishing plastic sleds for any more solo drags. I jimmy rigged it with a sturdier pull rope and slipped a section of PVC over rope as a handle. I'm gonna drill holes along sides so I can weave cord over any deer so it doesn't pop out when being heaved over fallen trees...and there are always fallen trees. 

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406dn

Congrats on a nice buck. No one enjoys the prospect of losing an animal. But it will happen from time to time. Quite a few years ago I lost a cow elk that I was certain I had hit. Part of the problem was there were so many elk and so many tracks and I could not find blood, even thou there was snow. I saw it flinch and the crosshairs were steady. It happens.

 

As far as getting an animal out,, horses make that job far easier. My brother's bull this fall was 4.5 miles from the trailhead. All downhill thou.

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dogrunner

 Nice buck. The shot looks decent,  did it hit the shoulder on the other side?  Did you find the broadhead?  If not watch out when your cutting it up. 

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