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MAArcher

How much burger?

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MAArcher

When you get your meat back from the butcher, what percent would you say comes back as burger?  I tell my butcher to do as little burger as possible, I’d rather have stew meat.  And I still end up with about 50% in burger.  When I do it myself it’s more like 25%.

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dogrunner

That sounds about right, I tell them the same thing and no matter who I use I never get what I tell them. Burger is to easy for them. 

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Kansas Bound

Usually comes back 25-35% burger

 

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Brad Eden

When having a deer processed, I typically ask for steaks, a roast or two, the inner loin left whole, and backstraps cut thick, 3-4 packages of stew meat and the rest burger. My guess is a good 1/3-1/2 of the haul is burger. Never weighed it. I've been cutting and packaging my own deer lately. Same cuts as mentioned above including 3-4 Packages of stew meat of about 1 or 1-1/2 lbs each. For an average Maine deer of 120-150lbs dressed I end up with around 15 packages of burger at 1 pound each or 15lbs. I don't take an exacto  blade and trim off all rib meat, excess neck meat etc. but do my due diligence to get as much extra meat off the animal as I can. I bet if I really went to town I could add a good 4-5 lbs more burger. What's left doesn't go to waste though since I save it for winter coyote bait.

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garyRI
On 12/2/2017 at 5:06 PM, MAArcher said:

When you get your meat back from the butcher, what percent would you say comes back as burger?  I tell my butcher to do as little burger as possible, I’d rather have stew meat.  And I still end up with about 50% in burger.  When I do it myself it’s more like 25%.

Tell them no burger stew meat only. A fifty dollar Kitchen Aid mixer's grinder attachment does a great job on half frozen meat and you can make hamburger to order. And trimmings keep better than ground meat anyway.

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MAArcher
19 minutes ago, garyRI said:

Tell them no burger stew meat only. A fifty dollar Kitchen Aid mixer's grinder attachment does a great job on half frozen meat and you can make hamburger to order. And trimmings keep better than ground meat anyway.

Hmmm.  That's a thought.  I don't want anything to end up in the trash though.  The butcher I'm using right now gives me back 50% of dressed hanging weight.  I suspect that would go down if I told him no burger.  I think I just have to get my butt in gear and clean my garage so I have room to do it myself for the next one.  I need to save some money too, I'm up to over $300 in butcher fees this season (he charges a buck a lb and $25 for skinning my buck for the taxidermist.  

 

The Kitchen Aid and grinder attachment is good advice though, I'd go that way next time.  But as it stands I already have an old 75lb Hobart beast of a grinder.

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Tim Frazier

I only take in meat I want ground.  We get mild or hot sausage in bulk 1lb packages for .50 a pound.  I take in the quarters if it's an older deer along with the neck.  I cut the back straps and tenderloins myself.  If it's a young deer I cut the whole thing myself to include steaks and stew meat.

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Samuel Hoggson

With old deer we get everything but tenderloins and backstraps ground up -  about 1/3 sausage, rest burger. 

 

Used to cut up two every year, using a Kitchen-aid for the burger.  Life got busy, and I got lazy.  Now retired, would consider cutting them up again but won't shoot little bucks or does.    

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Peent

We got tired of dry venison burger or freezer burn stew meat.  I can everything that isn't steak or roasts now.  Very easy, no need to be anal about trimming because all the fat and silver skin floats to the top and is easily plucked out before using.  Lasts for years.  

IMG_5681.JPG

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OldSarge

I can quite a bit of venison also. When freezer space is limited, the canned meat sits nicely on the pantry shelf. Also, you don't have to worry about a power outage with canned meat. You are correct, Peent, about the tallow and connective tissue just melting and floating to the surface of the jar. Usually forms a small wafer of waxy fat on top once the jar cools. I like to use trimmed out neck, front shoulder, and shank for canning. Super tender results also. Makes great stew base, or SOS gravy, or stroganoff. Dang, I'm getting hungry. Sometimes instead of grinding burger or sausage, I use that meat for canning. Good stuff.

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topdog1961

Today I processed the doe I posted a pic of in the "And so it begins" thread that I took last evening. No hanging for this one, I have to process when I have time, so it will get wet aged and I will make sausage and brats later this week, then give it all away. I didn't weigh her but did weigh the results. Apparently I get a lot more burger than most. But we like the that because I make brats, sausage and snack sticks from it. I don't do stew meat. And as noted in the "How do you process venison ham steaks" thread, I am "surgical" with them. I only use individual whole muscles big enough for steaks. The rest of the ham goes to burger. And the entire front quarters go to burger. Here are the results:

 

6.5 lb backstrap and inner loin

9 lb steak

4.3 lb roasts

31.6 lb burger cuts. 

51.4 total. 

 

That's over 60% burger cuts for me, and I'm fine with that. 

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bobman
On 12/8/2017 at 7:53 AM, Peent said:

We got tired of dry venison burger or freezer burn stew meat.  I can everything that isn't steak or roasts now.  Very easy, no need to be anal about trimming because all the fat and silver skin floats to the top and is easily plucked out before using.  Lasts for years.  

IMG_5681.JPG

 

I would really appreciate detailed instructions on how you do this and what appliances/gadgets are needed including brand recommendations 

 

thanks in advance

 

Bob

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Peent

Well you need a pressure cooker.  I use my Wife's grandmothers old vintage 21 quart cast aluminum pressure cooker made by Presto.  A most enjoyable old tool that holds some sentimental value.  I don't think a new shiny cheap old made in china pressure cooker would be as cool to use.  

 

I cube the meat giving very little thought to removing any fat or silver skin.  I trim off what is easy but the rest just gets put into the jars.  I use wide mouthed 1 quart jars, put in a tsp and a half of salt, a little pepper and pack it full of meat.  Push the meat down with a stick to remove any air bubbles and put the lid on.  I put three or so quarts of water in the cooker on the gas stove and add the canning jars.  I can fit 7 quarts in at a time.  

 

Turn on the gas on and when the pressure reaches 11 lbs start the timer for 90 minutes.  Keep the pressure at 11 lbs the entire time.  After 90 minutes shut the gas off and let the pressure drop and water cool.  Open the cooker and make sure the lids have popped down properly and your done. 

 

You can eat the canned meat however you like.  Heated up and over potato or rice is good.  Put it in chili.  Make a stew.  Eat it cold right out of the jar on crackers.  Very versatile.   

IMG_4172.JPG

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browndrake

I can a fair bit, from fruit and veggies to stews, to meats, etc.   I use some of the smaller "regular" size pressure cookers that hold 7 quart jars for small batches, but generally we fire up our campchef and use 2 All American 41-1/2-Quart Pressure Cooker Canners.  I'm biased but think that they are about as good as it gets....and for the pricetag they should be.   I can do between 19-21 quart jars (depending on brand and shape) at a time in each.

Unless you do lots of large batches of canning, the smaller canners make more sense.

just FYI:  you generally get about 1lb meat per pint/ 2lbs/qt.

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bobman
9 hours ago, Peent said:

Well you need a pressure cooker.  I use my Wife's grandmothers old vintage 21 quart cast aluminum pressure cooker made by Presto.  A most enjoyable old tool that holds some sentimental value.  I don't think a new shiny cheap old made in china pressure cooker would be as cool to use.  

 

I cube the meat giving very little thought to removing any fat or silver skin.  I trim off what is easy but the rest just gets put into the jars.  I use wide mouthed 1 quart jars, put in a tsp and a half of salt, a little pepper and pack it full of meat.  Push the meat down with a stick to remove any air bubbles and put the lid on.  I put three or so quarts of water in the cooker on the gas stove and add the canning jars.  I can fit 7 quarts in at a time.  

 

Turn on the gas on and when the pressure reaches 11 lbs start the timer for 90 minutes.  Keep the pressure at 11 lbs the entire time.  After 90 minutes shut the gas off and let the pressure drop and water cool.  Open the cooker and make sure the lids have popped down properly and your done. 

 

You can eat the canned meat however you like.  Heated up and over potato or rice is good.  Put it in chili.  Make a stew.  Eat it cold right out of the jar on crackers.  Very versatile.   

IMG_4172.JPG

wow that’s simple enough I’ve been wanting to try this for a long time. One question when you allow the water to cool do you mean to room temperature or can you just remove the jars and start another batch and let the jars cool on a towel on your counter.

 

As an aside you have a beautiful kitchen All that counter space is very nice.

 

Is the salt and pepper mandatory, I also want to can venison for my dogs.

 

We can kill 24 deer between the wife and I.

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