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dogrunner

Fowled Out. A North American Slam.

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dogrunner

He must have some $.  Plus he sure has a lot of decoys. 

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CA22D3A5-9E36-4280-BA2F-170374092B66.jpeg

BC66D86F-6313-436A-87D6-019B4DF12306.jpeg

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mister grouse

I couldn't read the fine print, and wondered if he had shot a mandarin duck. I shot a ,mandarin drake  last week that came in with some wood ducks.  I dont know if it escaped from a chinese restaurant , escaped an aviary, was bred here, or crossed from the orient .  Personally Ive never seen one before o heard of anyone shooting one in the wild.    Pretty surprised to see that huge orange flank feather fly by.  Supposedly some wild reproduction and possible interbreeding of mandarins and wood ducks in  North carolina, florida and California, but getting one on a hunt  is darned rare I think. 

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dogrunner

I can read it better on my phone than on my laptop.  Its in Field & Stream magazine. 

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Treerooster

I had an eye appointment and read that article while in the waiting room. The Cinnamon immediately caught my eye. Love hunting teal. We get a few Cinnamons here in eastern Colorado but it's hard to identify them unless you know what to look for as they are still in eclipse.

 

I don't think a Mandarin is part of the 47 (or was it 49) species in N America.

 

Slams are not for me but I thought it was a cool article and accomplishment. A dedicated ducker for sure.

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mister grouse
57 minutes ago, Treerooster said:

 

 

I don't think a Mandarin is part of the 47 (or was it 49) species in N America.

 

Slams are not for me but I thought it was a cool article and accomplishment. A dedicated ducker for sure.

 

Agree the article is cool and the accomplishment is quite a feat.  Not sure how the Species list was set up originally but one  would think if there was a continental breeding population of some species of "new" ducks , like the Mandarin, then such ducks might be added.  Off top of my head, I can think of a few upland bird species that are not native on this continent in terms of "beginning of time" native, but are everybody's Slam list e.g...Pheasant, Chukar,  Hun, etc.

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braque du upstate

Funny , i caught that article . Snapped a photo so I would remember the taxidermist. 

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Treerooster

Not sure if you read the article as it is difficult to read in the pic. In the article they do talk about how there is no real "official" waterfowl slam and that some slams consist of only 41 (if my memory serves) species. 

 

So I guess the slam is what one tends to make it. I believe there are cases of European Widgeon and other types of teal besides our normal 3 being shot in N America, but I don't think they are considered a N American duck. And then there are the hybrids...

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Jakeismydog2

I could not really read the print but from what I can tell he is obviously not married.

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dogrunner
56 minutes ago, Jakeismydog2 said:

I could not really read the print but from what I can tell he is obviously not married.

Wrong, married 4 kids and a real job whatever that consist of not sure. 

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quailguy
On 12/10/2017 at 12:44 PM, mister grouse said:

I don't think a Mandarin is part of the 47 (or was it 49) species in N America.

 

 Don't think so either but there are a few in the US. They are cousins of the wood duck. WIKI:

The town of Black Mountain, North Carolina has a limited population,[6] and there is a free-flying feral population of several hundred mandarins in Sonoma County, California. This population is the result of several mandarin ducks escaping from captivity, then going on to reproduce in the wild.[3]

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mister grouse
43 minutes ago, quailguy said:

Don't think so either but there are a few in the US. They are cousins of the wood duck. WIKI:

The town of Black Mountain, North Carolina has a limited population,[6] and there is a free-flying feral population of several hundred mandarins in Sonoma County, California. This population is the result of several mandarin ducks escaping from captivity, then going on to reproduce in the wild.[3]

 Yes, referred to that NC population and Wiki info  in my first post on the topic ( I read the same WIKI after I got the bird home).  Highly likely the bird I shot came out of the Carolina population at some point , since it was taken a few hundred miles "down the river and over the mountian" from Black Mountain. 

 

I did not mean to derail the OP topic,as the article and the feat of shooting all the various species is a interesting topic.  Ive been lucky enough to waterfowl hunt "all over" the US, and from memory  have taken all the US lower 48 inland (non saltwater) species (except  the Mottled duck west of the Mississippi if that is a different from Florida mottled species, fulvous, alaskan birds, swan, crane, brandt) ).  

 

 I will say the Mandarin was the biggest surprise duck Ive seen fly in to the decoys in my experience.  

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quailguy
19 hours ago, mister grouse said:

Ive been lucky enough to waterfowl hunt "all over" the US, and from memory  have taken all the US lower 48 inland (non saltwater) species (except  the Mottled duck west of the Mississippi if that is a different from Florida mottled species, fulvous, alaskan birds, swan, crane, brandt) ).  

 

 That is quite an accomplishment, congratulations !!

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Jakeismydog2
On 12/11/2017 at 5:51 PM, dogrunner said:

Wrong, married 4 kids and a real job whatever that consist of not sure. 

 

#FakeNews

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Rick Hall
On 12/11/2017 at 7:37 PM, mister grouse said:

 Ive been lucky enough to waterfowl hunt "all over" the US, and from memory  have taken all the US lower 48 inland (non saltwater) species (except  the Mottled duck west of the Mississippi if that is a different from Florida mottled species.

 

 

I'm no ornithologist, but our mottleds are said to differ from Florida mottleds.  I would think the Mexican duck (or Mexican mallard) much, much harder to come by than either.

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mister grouse
9 hours ago, Rick Hall said:

m no ornithologist, but our mottleds are said to differ from Florida mottleds.  I would think the Mexican duck (or Mexican mallard) much, much harder to come by than either.

  I was surprised the La Mottled was not on the "LIST" contained in the article, and I guess the Mexican Mottled Mallard could be on it too for that matter, as I think there are some found in Texas, New Mexico and maybe Arizona (Rick - correct his please if your info is different). 

 

Here is an article I just read when considering the question of what are true North American species, and  it is  informative , short read: ( I'M UNABLE TO LINK IT, SORRY):

 

2010

Papers in the Biological Sciences

Waterfowl of North America: Waterfowl Distributions and Migrations in North America

Paul A. Johnsgard
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, pajohnsgard@gmail.com

 

 

I didn't set out in my waterfowl hunting to  fill anybody "s "all species" list or complete any "Slam"; but in looking at this fellows list I just realized I had taken a big chunk of the birds he listed. Treerooster and I have talked personally in the past about Slams, all species lists etc, and  how some folks can get obsessed with the Slam, and lose sight of the beauty and experience of each hunt "while trying "to check off  a box".   The  birds I have taken "just happened"  while traveling and hunting with no preconceived plan for a particular species. 

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