Jump to content
BlacknTan

Canine Nutrition.. The more I study, the less I know

Recommended Posts

PartridgeCartridge

I mix the high protein, 30/20, with the 26/16 for the first night of a hunt and then feed straight 30/20 for the next few days.

 

I try to stay away from the high protein stuff at home as it makes him hyper and that food makes their poop stink with all of the protein.

 

YMMV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
terrym

So 26/16 during the off season?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PartridgeCartridge

That's what I'm doing and Ollie is looking like a cut up stud. Two cups at night. period.

 

Maybe a small snack in the mid day like a small biscuit. He seems happy, healthy, completely fit, handsome and will eat your hand if he mistakes it for his snack.:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dogrunner
24 minutes ago, PartridgeCartridge said:

I mix the high protein, 30/20, with the 26/16 for the first night of a hunt and then feed straight 30/20 for the next few days.

 

I try to stay away from the high protein stuff at home as it makes him hyper and that food makes their poop stink with all of the protein.

 

YMMV

The experts say the change over time for food to make a difference is 6/8 weeks.  So if you switch foods 2 months in advance to get the benefit of the higher protein and fat content.  Sled dogs run on a high fat diet, fat = energy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PartridgeCartridge
9 minutes ago, dogrunner said:

The experts say the change over time for food to make a difference is 6/8 weeks.  So if you switch foods 2 months in advance to get the benefit of the higher protein and fat content.  Sled dogs run on a high fat diet, fat = energy. 

I get that and Ollie is at the top of his protein intake anyways.

 

Actually my feed in the truck for hunts is a hi/lo protein mix  that he eats since October. But I have noticed that as soon as he goes 30/20, his shiit stinks and he wants to play and wrestle late at night in camp. Its a balance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OceanRoamer

Costco 26/16 supplemented with a scrambled egg from our chickens every once in while...maybe a dab of leftover gravy...if there is any. But I’m only feeding two dogs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SLR

A friend and I split delivered pallets (about one ton) of Inukshuk 30/25. We feed 10 dogs between the two of us. I like the high fat content (and the fish meal) and the packaging: foil bags with a vacuum seal. Cost is about $.80 per lb. My biggest problem is rodent control where I store the feed. Mice chew holes in bags and break the vacuum seal. I also supplement with free meat scraps from my son's store, eggs from our hens, and table scraps. These supplemental meats can be lean or fatty. They include turkey breast, roast beef, hot dogs, baloney, and others from his deli. I try to control weight by adjusting the portions as needed. The dogs also eat things they pick up outside, just like the wild canids (fox and coyote). They eat apples, grass, meadow voles, etc.  Judging from some things they voluntarily eat they have a rugged digestive system. 

 

No doubt some feeds are better than others and that may vary with the individual dogs, but I think people are too obsessive about their dog's diets. Dogs are omnivores with a preference for meat. They are adaptable.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobman

I studied this until it about drive me crazy

 

FWIW look at nutri source grain free chicken 

research the company and the food, that’s what I landed on and feel it’s very good quality 

 

when my dogs reach around 6 I start adding fresh chicken to their food and cut back a little on the kibble

 

Im planning on turning a bunch of deer into dog food this year we can kill 12 and it’s not hard to find 12 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gyrfolco
21 hours ago, dogrunner said:

Interesting choice, never heard of it before. Don’t look like it’s made in the USA and it’s quite pricey. 

I believe it's made in France. I use it because it's the best I've found for my dogs. And, I love the fact that 97% of it's protein comes from meat! I believe that's why it's so good. They always have a price code that gives you 10% off, but it is still more than a lot of foods. I've seen the difference in the field as well as the kennel so I'll keep sending them my money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NCgrouse

My dog popped up with a chicken allergy all of a sudden one day (which I didn't know was even possible). She was on Pro Plan Performance 30/20.

 

 So now we get Holistic Select Coastal Catch (32/18), and I try and add back some fat (either olive oil or beef fat) when shes really burning the calories. Since she had a sugar crash about 2 years ago on a wet cold weather hunt, I feed twice daily. She does just fine for us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BlacknTan
5 hours ago, SLR said:

 The dogs also eat things they pick up outside, just like the wild canids (fox and coyote). They eat apples, grass, meadow voles, etc.  Judging from some things they voluntarily eat they have a rugged digestive system. 

 

No doubt some feeds are better than others and that may vary with the individual dogs, but I think people are too obsessive about their dog's diets. Dogs are omnivores with a preference for meat. They are adaptable.

 

 

 

I think Solon has hit on the answer here..

 

I always tried to think of what a dog would eat in the wild. In the scat of the local coyotes, I see traces of many items I did not associate with canines.. berries in particular. So, since I remember the days before designer dogs foods, when many existed quite well on human table scraps, just like the wild dogs that hung put just beyond  the fires of our ancient ancestors, perhaps this entire issue is being over-thought a bit, by my good self at least.

 

I guess smart marketing people influence our decisions much more than we think, by playing off our desires to do what's best for our friends..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Urban_Redneck

I feed raw. My dog is healthy, happy, and doesn't need her teeth scraped.

 

As to dogs eating berries and nuts... they will also drink anti-freeze :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TonyS

I have a strong aversion to anything Purina after having to put down a dog that suffered horrible skin rashes that we now know were caused by Purina ''saving money' and putting corn into the feed.  The poor dog's skin was riddled with pustules that contained staff infections.  I loved that dog.

 

I now feed Kirkland Adult Lamb and Rice which seems to suit my dog.  I supplement it with carrots (for anal gland problems) and cooked yams for occasional runs.  He loves both supplements which helps.  The cost is about 70 cents a pound.  Skin, coat, and energy level are in great shape.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonT

I'm curious I see numbers like 30/20 or 26/16, this is protein/fat,  what's is the the other  50/58%?   I didn't know that canines where omnivores, could you send me a link to that research. 

 

I don't know how you can prove that one food is nutritionally better.  You can have a preferred meat choice, protein to fat ratio, brand, recall history and picture on the bag.  You can of course ask around and I think most Gun dogs are on one of the performance Purina foods and are happy with it.  When you hear of problems with a kibble, I think it's a isolated problem with that dogs intolerance to grain/corn or what ever that 50/58% contains.  

 

I think they add flavoring to kibble.  

 

In the past I would come in contact with a lot of dogs and would take in a dog to re-home, this dog would get fed Orijen.  I have not looked at this kibble in a while, so do your own research.  

 

I do blood work/cbc on my dogs every few year, just to see where they are at and to have a base line.  Also I check their feces and ribs every few days and adjust their food accordingly.  Also I keep an eye on their energy levels and recovery rate. 

 

Disclaimer, I feed RAW.  About 68% meat,  10+% fat, 12+% bone and 10% organs.   Meat is high in moisture so there may be 15+% water in this formal.    These ratios are not stagnate and are adjusted from dog to dog and their needs.  I have been doing this for 15+ years with multiple dogs.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dogwood
22 hours ago, TonyS said:

I have a strong aversion to anything Purina after having to put down a dog that suffered horrible skin rashes that we now know were caused by Purina ''saving money' and putting corn into the feed.  The poor dog's skin was riddled with pustules that contained staff infections.  I loved that dog.

 

I now feed Kirkland Adult Lamb and Rice which seems to suit my dog.  I supplement it with carrots (for anal gland problems) and cooked yams for occasional runs.  He loves both supplements which helps.  The cost is about 70 cents a pound.  Skin, coat, and energy level are in great shape.

 

 

 

The vast majority of dog foods use corn as the base carbohydrate because it makes the formulation affordable and very nutritious.  Cooked corn is a highly digestible carb and inexpensive as it is a subsidized crop.  So I think it's an overreach to blame the manufacturer for your dogs potential food allergies.  If your vet concurred that a food allergy was to blame you should have been directed to try a hypoallergenic diet, of which there are many.

 

BTW I have no idea what carrots do for anal gland problems.  Ditto for yams for the runs.  Weird.

 

As I've stated before most dogs live wonderfully on most diets that are balanced and complete, AAFCO certified.  The current "grain free" banner is a clever marketing (and VERY effective I might add) ploy without real merit for the majority of dogs.  Caveat emptor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×