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Remo

Planting Oaks

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Remo

I was going through some pics from last fall and found a few on a habitat project with the neighbor kids. We were out for a walk in September and noticed a large number of acorns under a burr oak. It had rained recently and some of the acorns were sprouting in the wet grass. So the little kids picked any they saw with a sprout and we planted them. A lot more than I thought we would. Don't ever give six year olds a grocery bag to pick acorns.

 

 17-DSC_4530

 

I have 40 acres of old RR right-of-way in a walk-in program so that might be a good spot for oaks. Earlier in the summer I sprayed out 3' circles for fall planting other trees so that is where they were planted. The kids flagged each spot.

 

18-DSC_4533

 

Bought some tree tubes for some red oak saplings that were planted at the same time. The burr oak will need tree tubes too if they emerge next spring. Rodents and deer are tough on small oaks.

 

03-DSC_4619

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Chops

Cool project.  Someone 50 years from now will sure appreciate your work. 

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dlmorris

50 years from now.... maybe those same kids with there kids and /or grandkids

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Peent

Here is some trivia for you if you are interested.  Burr oak is in the white oak family.  These oaks will germinate immediately  after falling in the fall.  Red oaks (black, pin, etc) will over winter and stratify before germinating in the spring.  This poses some management options for each type.    FWIW.  

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barna
On ‎12‎/‎13‎/‎2017 at 12:52 PM, Remo said:

I was going through some pics from last fall and found a few on a habitat project with the neighbor kids. We were out for a walk in September and noticed a large number of acorns under a burr oak. It had rained recently and some of the acorns were sprouting in the wet grass. So the little kids picked any they saw with a sprout and we planted them. A lot more than I thought we would. Don't ever give six year olds a grocery bag to pick acorns.

 

 17-DSC_4530

 

I have 40 acres of old RR right-of-way in a walk-in program so that might be a good spot for oaks. Earlier in the summer I sprayed out 3' circles for fall planting other trees so that is where they were planted. The kids flagged each spot.

 

18-DSC_4533

 

Bought some tree tubes for some red oak saplings that were planted at the same time. The burr oak will need tree tubes too if they emerge next spring. Rodents and deer are tough on small oaks.

 

03-DSC_4619

Cool project, did you guys end up planting the black walnuts from a few years back?

 

Barna  

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Remo

Barna, yes I did. Unfortunately I did not put tree tubes on them immediately when they came up and the meadow voles clipped them off right at ground level. Saved 3 I think. I planted more in deep tubs this spring and will transplant them in April.

Peent, I tried planting red oak acorns in the fall of '16 but none germinated. Directly in the ground and also in tubs. They were from a kilo I bought from PA. So this fall I bought red oak seedlings from Itasca Greenhouse.  Real nice stock.

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Reeba

When our kids were young, they would collect random acorns in the fall.  We'd layer them between sand in perforated 5 gal. buckets and bury them.  

The following spring we'd plant them with the help of the local FFA (fund raiser for them).  We just used small plastic tubes to protect them from rodents.  The biggest problem here is deer browse.  So they should be fenced or 4 ft tree shelters.  We had too many to make that practical.  So amongst those and other bare root stock we have lots of 3 ft tall 20 yr. old oaks a few of which outgrow the deer each year.

 

 

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Reeba

Two grouse friendly tree species we can plant in our old field that the deer leave alone are white birch and black cherry.  Unfortunately, the bears are hard on the black cherries.  When they bear fruit,  the bears climb them and break the tops off.  So every year they break the tops off the best looking trees.  Not much you can do about bears they'd just tear a fence down.

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Remo
On 12/16/2017 at 1:35 PM, Reeba said:

When our kids were young, they would collect random acorns in the fall.  We'd layer them between sand in perforated 5 gal. buckets and bury them.  

The following spring we'd plant them with the help of the local FFA (fund raiser for them).  We just used small plastic tubes to protect them from rodents.  The biggest problem here is deer browse.  So they should be fenced or 4 ft tree shelters.  We had too many to make that practical.  So amongst those and other bare root stock we have lots of 3 ft tall 20 yr. old oaks a few of which outgrow the deer each year.

 

 

The red oak seedlings are in 4' tubes and any burr oak that emerge will be the same. A few burr oak we transplanted 2 years ago are pushing a foot + of growth per year which is good for this climate. These tubes come from the County Soil Conservation and will be reuseable so should cut the cost at least in half. The damn deer have browsing options galore but won't leave an oak tree alone. Same for apple trees. Send wolves....

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barna

I planted a few Italian plum trees this spring, the deer took the leaves off as soon as they came out, but left apple, pear and cherry alone, I had to fight the Japanese beetles on those.  Also planted 4 paw paw trees, so far no problems with deer. I think deer will leave the paw paw fruit alone as well. 

 

Barna    

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ScottGrush

We planted some 30 or so burr oaks in 2014, good stock from a nursery, fenced to keep deer away. In one location 9 of 10 are dead due to defoliation by rose chafers.

In the other site most have survived(like 19 of 20) but this Spring tent caterpillars hit them hard. Seems like something is always hungry when it comes to doing any conservation work. 

 

 

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Big Al

 I planted five shelter belts in Montana in 2010.  They consisted of Juniper, chokecherry, Russian olive and caragana.  They are L shaped and each arm is about 250 yards long.  Between deer, elk and draught it is almost impossible to grow them up.  One belt was totally ate the first year.  In two other belts half the plants either died or were ate.  The shrubs that survived are maybe three foot high. The other two have done ok with some plants up to 6'.  I filled in some of the holes this spring with caragana and juniper.  I'll see what they look like come spring. I'm not too optimistic.

 

Montana is a harsh land.

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Big Al

Remo,  your first picture looks like a demon raggedy Anne doll head.:)

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Remo

:D   It is hard getting trees going on prairie land but good to try. If I ever plant rows again I'd have Soil Conservation lay down the plastic weed barrier. I put a couple 100 juniper in without the barrier at the same time a friend did his with it. Mine are half as tall. Junipers are a tough tree, good shelter from winter storms and about 50 different song birds eat the berries.

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Big Al

Was told about the weed mat a couple of years ago.  Too late.  

We started using a pig blood concentrate this year as a deer, elk repellent.  I think it's somewhat effective.  

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