Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Brad Eden

      TO THOSE REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UJ   01/06/2018

      To the Guests who have decided to register for Membership. PLEASE read Terms of Service, not just checking it off. This is covered there: Add more info than just "hunting" or "Upland hunting" or "birds" or "outdoors" or similar nebulous terms in the required INTERESTS field. Despite this Boards strong spam filtering function, some Spam registrations do sneak through. I need an inkling that you are a human being not a Spam Bot tagging onto key words. Also please do not use a business name as your User Name. Thank you.
Sign in to follow this  
Tim Frazier

Teal 2018

Recommended Posts

Tim Frazier

I have developed a liking for teal over the years, but there aren't many shot around here.  That actually could be a false statement but more correctly "I don't shoot many around here"  I have found I am more likely to shoot them in PA where the season comes in 2 weeks earlier but I'm not convinced Western PA is a destination for teal shooting.

 

My brother-in-law was in North Dakota earlier than usual this year and spoke of all the teal, but he goes after big ducks and was cursing the good weather.

 

What are the good teal hunting destinations?  I believe one board member used to travel to Louisiana every winter to shoot teal and I know Rick Hall has guided/hunted teal for many years there.  Are there other early season teal hot spots?  I know they are weather sensitive so does that eliminate northern states due to variations in fall weather?

 

Just trying to learn a little more.  Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marc Ret

Tim, I'm pretty certain it was popplecop who hunted LA every January. Since he passed away earlier this year, a search of his postings might provide some insight. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tim Frazier
11 minutes ago, Marc Ret said:

Tim, I'm pretty certain it was popplecop who hunted LA every January. Since he passed away earlier this year, a search of his postings might provide some insight. 

Yep it was, I never thought of doing that, duh!   I know every once in awhile him and Rick talked about it as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
charlo slim

Northern breeding ground teal often can be a weather-dependent crap shoot, a bit like doves in that regard.  UJ member Rick Hall would know the ropes from the wintering ground side of things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mister grouse

Blue wings are early migrators; there are early special teal seasons in the Mississippi flyway in September; often in conjunction with a short wood duck season; usually lasting 7-10 days.  . I know KY, La,  Miss,  and Tenn have those Sept seasons and some other states as well.  Not many BW left in mid south when the  late November -early December lengthy "regular" duck seasons open.  Ive never killed many GW in the September seasons , and the BW are usually here today , gone tomorrow where I hunt in Sept.  However , I have had some great hunts for them in that time period.  La and Texas are best bets I think for B W in later winter seasons.  

 

 My experience is that  Green wings are pretty hardy, and in the regular seasons actually hang around the mid south long after many of the other  species inland species  have gone much further south.  Typically there are many still around at end of January seasons close (and even in iced up conditions at that time).   Ive shot them late season In January in Ky, Tenn, Ala, Miss, and Ark.  I think Sc coast has teal pretty much through the season, as do southern Gulf Coast states besides La. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KerryLuft

This page will give you searchable data for ducks harvested by species/state/flyway.

 

If you want to shoot bluewings, I'd go to south Louisiana, specifically around Buras/Venice, for the 16-day September season.  Texas can also be good. In the regular season, south Louisiana is excellent for greenwings and there usually are some bluewings hanging around.

 

California is outstanding for greenwings and you might shoot a cinnamon too. But the single best marsh I've ever seen for greenwings is in Utah -- seven bird Pacific Flyway limit and if it's right, it's no problem at all to shoot a strap of drakes in a couple hours or less.

 

IMG_2076[1].JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mccuha

In my opinion teal are the best eating duck.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kemo Sabe

Tim,

 

Our marsh goes hot and cold with how many teal make it on one’s strap. I got seven drake green wings one day last year in December.

 

Right now we are getting quite a few. If you are ever in California during duck season, let me know. The more advanced notice the better.

AE41CD7E-4564-40DD-A57C-DA7070E0FACF.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kemo Sabe

Here’s a funny teal story.......

 

On the Wednesday before the opening of the 2015 season, I hung the picture shown in the second photograph in my room at the duck club, as I’m a big fan of ducks and pumpguns.

 

Three days later, I shot all three kinds of teal shown in the picture. A cinnamon , a blue wing, and a green wing. Now, we have a lot of green wing teal in our marsh, and a few cinnamon ones. I usually get one or two a season. But blue wing teal are very rare in our marsh. In 50 years of duck hunting here, I’ve shot a grand total of just one other one.

 

To get all three drakes on the same day was something the old timers in our club had never seen. Throw in hanging that picture right before hand, and you have a great story to tell over and over again.

 

To commemorate this, I had a painting done by Chris Smith over at Pointing Dog Journal. That’s it in the other photo I posted right below. I had it done with my 870 pumpgun, my field bag, and hat. Way cool, and it hangs in my study at home.

4E61B3D5-6397-4F6C-94D4-570D125EEF04.jpeg

73535D75-D4B5-40C9-8F40-8B840A38EA1D.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rick Hall
On 12/13/2017 at 2:29 PM, Marc Ret said:

Tim, I'm pretty certain it was popplecop who hunted LA every January. Since he passed away earlier this year, a search of his postings might provide some insight. 

 

Teal generally come and go with the wind in our marsh (and all the more so in my mostly flotant prairie end of it).  But Popplecop hunted with folks who have a place in the Pecan Island area, where they seem more reliable.  But if I were traveling to Louisiana for teal, I'd book with someone hunting the mouth of the Mississippi, where both greenwings and bluewings are apt to swarm all season long. (And the afternoon fishing is great.)  It is in many ways as close as the states are apt to come to a "world class" waterfowling destination.

 

Wish I could recommend a Venice guide, but they're off my radar on that end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KerryLuft

In Buras, try Ryan Lambert's Cajun Fishing Adventures.  Great guy, great lodge and great service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Treerooster

I love hunting the early teal season. Such a fun duck to hunt. I am in NE Colorado and all my experience stems from hunting teal there. I hunt public waters.

 

Our early teal season is all about the Blue wings. Those are the ones migrating in September. Green wings are legal but they really migrate later.

 

By early Oct most Blue wings are gone... usually.

 

Blues love a receding waterline (common in our reservoirs and ponds in Sept) and will feed in the mucky mud created by it.

 

Teal really like a specific spot on a pond. If you set up in another area on the pond they may buzz your dekes and then go land where they like to.

 

Teal decoys are not necessary, but I use them all the time in the early teal season. Part of waterfowling for me is setting the dekes just right so the ducks land right where I want them. Get a real kick out of that. Anyways, if teal and mallard decoys are out, teal will most often land with the teal dekes. I usually use a few mallards and anywhere from 6 to 24 teal decoys depending on the water I am hunting.

 

A teal call is not needed either but I use a Blue wing call. I have turned them with it at times.

 

Teal will buzz your set up in range and them fly on. A good portion of the time they will fly out a ways and come back in to land. If there are good numbers of teal around I let them go on the first pass and take them when they come back around. They are putting on the brakes and slowing down so the shooting is easier. Plus it's a real gas to see 10 to 20 teal coming straight at you, about 10 feet off the deck, and then they start that rocking thing just before they land. If the teal numbers are low I take what I can get.

 

I shoot steel 2 3/4" Win Expert, number 6 shot, 1 1/8 oz in my 12ga choked IC. Deadly on teal.

 

We have lots of Shovelers out here, they have blue shoulders too. The Shovelers will fly right with the teal sometimes. Looking at the beak helps not to shoot the Shovelers and helps to shoot in front of a teal too. Woodducks can fly like a teal. A Redhead silhouette looks a lot like a Blue wing, only bigger.

 

I always want to be set up and sipping a cup of coffee at least 10 minutes before shooting light. Sometimes the action can all be in the first few minutes.  But there is nothing like enjoying the dawn...then you here that gentle splash...and...Baaaa-bap-bap.

 

 

I love getting "buzzed" by Blue wings. I'll be sitting there at the edge of some cattails and about 20 teal come from behind and woooosh over my head only 10 or 20 feet above me. They are out of range before I can react but no worries...they'll probably come back in.

 

3 times I have seen a Blue wing come in so fast I thought it's wings would tear off. The rush of it's wings and the fwop fwop it made as it did a couple of twists was quite loud. I never have hit one going that fast, didn't even get on 2 of them quick enough to shoot at them.

 

Couple of teal jokes;

 

Get a dead mallard, a dead teal, and a needle. Poke a hole in the mallard 's head and listen carefully. You won't hear anything. Poke the teal and listen...you will hear a phiiiit. That's is the vacuum in it's head filling up with air.

 

Teal aren't dumb ducks...they're just a trusting duck.

 

Sorry to be so wordy...but I really love to hunt teal. Good luck and I hope you have some great teal hunts in your quest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mister grouse

One thing I have found to be deadly on calling Green Wings is a short Peep on a referees whistle, or a simple dog whistle.  Just a hard enough blow in the whistle to make a sharp chirp but not hard enough to rattle the ball in the whistle.  I repeat the chirp/peep several times until the birds turn.  That chirp /peep has turned many groups of GW and singles right back in to the decoys.  It has worked   in several states. Try it.

 

Hen teal are often noisy pre dawn, and have a very distinctive raspy  fast call.  Those very high pitched wooden cajun teal calls , if mastered in the fast cadence,  can be very effective, especially on the blue wings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kemo Sabe
On 12/16/2017 at 9:00 AM, mister grouse said:

One thing I have found to be deadly on calling Green Wings is a short Peep on a referees whistle, or a simple dog whistle.  Just a hard enough blow in the whistle to make a sharp chirp but not hard enough to rattle the ball in the whistle.  I repeat the chirp/peep several times until the birds turn.  That chirp /peep has turned many groups of GW and singles right back in to the decoys.  It has worked   in several states. Try it.

 

Hen teal are often noisy pre dawn, and have a very distinctive raspy  fast call.  Those very high pitched wooden cajun teal calls , if mastered in the fast cadence,  can be very effective, especially on the blue wings.

 

In my experience, teal can be the most tricky to call and decoy in. It seems that so many times, that have a pre-set flight plan, and don’t want to much come off of it. At least in our marsh. 

 

However, I agree with mister grouse in that the “peep” call using a referees whistle or a Wingsetter Is most often your best bet.. Then again, I’ve seen Mallard hen calls and drake sprig whistles do the trick as well.The widgeon “who-weeee-who” can get them heading your way, too.

 

The “distinctively raspy fast call” that mister grouse refers to can be deadly at times. Mine is made by Hydel, and they call it their Cinnamin Teal call. It’s very raspy and the first time you use it and have never heard it prior, you’re going to think you’re doing it wrong. But it does work well on some days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rick Hall

My little pothole is well off the more broken marsh routes they tend to travel, and I flat squall at both blue and green-wings with a teal-tuned big duck call.  Teal version "contest hails" followed by rapid every-duck-on-the-pond "come-backs" and finally momma teal double kacking to keep them lined up on the guns.   Only time I whistle is advertising in the fog or at LST on dark mornings - and then count on hen kacking to finish what that may draw.  My whistling is the short trilling peep of the males, done with my soft pallet as if I were starting to gargle.   They're #1 in our bag more years than not, so it doesn't run 'em all off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×