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markbrit

Cast Iron Christmas

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Chesepeakes_Man
1 hour ago, RDG said:

Like suggested ... I usually just wipe mine  out after use. 

 

For harder  stuck on stuff, I put in a 1/4" of water and bring it to boil whole scrubbing it with a light brush. Works every time.  Just give it a light coat of oil before putting it away. 

 

This above. I have been a CI cook and collector for many years and thought I had a pretty nice set. Some of mine have been handed down from my mothers family............ Until I met me wife. She has a beautiful set of Griswolds that I droll over. 

 

Dale 

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VizslavsBird

If its a little stuck on stuff from your cooking, plain ol table salt and elbow grease with a damp cloth will take off, the burnt on.    Rinse with water, oil and heat up to continue the seasoning.

 

When I get an old piece of unknown history, I build a fire and toss it cooking side down on the coals.  Remove the next day and wipe with wet cloth.  Rub with lard, low heat in the oven for an hour, repeat until a pound of lard is gone.  Sugar bacon and tomatoes are the worst things to cook in cast iron, imho. 

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RuffChaser
On 12/27/2017 at 8:50 AM, kgb said:

I've used a Griswold no 8 skillet since 1991 and when my wife decided to try blackened catfish with it I bought her a no 9 of the same type. The larger pan is perfect for a batch of cornbread, mine is a breakfast maker and both get pretty constant general use. Mine's due for a re-start, my BIL used to re-treat his by tossing it in an annual Autumn bonfire and fishing it out the next day. His was a very small version suitable for one over easy or dippy egg at a time and would build up a black crust from the edge inward. 

 

A couple years ago I finally picked up a Griswold oven in size 8 from a guy I see at gunshows, he seasons his iron with grapeseed oil via a kiln and it is durable. Stews and soups turn out perfect, and while food's appearance on the plate is an element of enjoying a meal I get a warm fuzzy seeing a ladle handle resting on the rim of this pot as the contents steam their way to done. 

 

The lid also fits the same size skillet, sorta makes me want a no 9 Chicken Fryer pan and its associated self-basting lid. 

 

 

Good old Griswold made in my hometown of Erie, PA. I have 4 or 5 of them. My Mom cooked a lot on Griswold. The best ever.

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ccavacini

When my pan has caked on stuff, I use  rolled up aluminum foil to scrape it (along with some salt and a little water)  Foil works great.  I also use it to scrape crud off the grill.

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Fishnfowler

I grew up with cast iron and cook on it almost daily.  When I started working as a river guide, I got introduced to dutch oven cooking with coals and have over 30 seasons of experience.  When it comes to cleaning, people seem to vehemently fall into two camps, soap or no soap.  I wash with soap and water like any other pan or dish.  I've got enough things to get worried about, that how someone else cleans a dish doesn't get me riled.  It is funny when I camp with someone who never uses soap and they have a conniption over how I clean.  I've also eaten out of peoples cast iron where they used a vegetable oil that turned rancid or the pancakes taste like garlic and fish.  That is a type of nasty I can live without.  When I put my river DO's away for the season, I use mineral oil on them for long-term storage.

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Hub
7 minutes ago, Fishnfowler said:

I grew up with cast iron and cook on it almost daily.  When I started working as a river guide, I got introduced to dutch oven cooking with coals and have over 30 seasons of experience.  When it comes to cleaning, people seem to vehemently fall into two camps, soap or no soap.  I wash with soap and water like any other pan or dish.  I've got enough things to get worried about, that how someone else cleans a dish doesn't get me riled.  It is funny when I camp with someone who never uses soap and they have a conniption over how I clean.  I've also eaten out of peoples cast iron where they used a vegetable oil that turned rancid or the pancakes taste like garlic and fish.  That is a type of nasty I can live without.  When I put my river DO's away for the season, I use mineral oil on them for long-term storage.

When you wash a cast iron pan with soap you remove the seasoning and with it the 'non-stick' portion of the pan.  If you re-season after washing with soap it might be ok, but a well seasoned pan that is never washed with soap is going to be a lot less apt to stick.  I can flip an egg on mine and lots of people who have struggled with calphalon or crummy teflon coated pans become believers after how non-stick cast iron can be.  I will concede that even non-soap washed pans need to be re-seasoned from time to time.  Tomato sauce is particularly bad at eating the finished off.  I clean my cast iron by running it under hot water and scrubbing with a brush while the pan is still hot.  In some instances breaking out the green scrubby is necessary.  I even bake most things in cast iron.  I have 9x12 cast iron sheet cake pans and bananna bread pans etc.  The only downside to cast iron is the weight.  The lazy-susan in my cabinet is not a fan of rotating 150#'s of pans.  

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Riffle Runner

Many ways to skin a cat.  I use a bit of soap with a brush after each use, rinse, then put back on the fire or stove top to evaporate off all the moisture.  Then I pour in a tablespoon of oil and rub into the hot cast iron with a folded paper towel and let cool before placing back in the cupboard.  Inherited my cast iron deep-sided pan & lid from my grandmother and its great.  I have several other cast iron fry pans including a no-name and a Griswold from estate sales and I REALLY prefer the older pans that have a smooth-finished interior surface.  The newer pans from Lodge and Cabelas have a rough, pebbled interior surface that I don't like as much.  - Not sure if it is lesser fit & finish on the new production or what??

 

Beautiful, new pans can be had from butterpatindustries.com, but be ready to bust out a couple hundos...

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kgb

I've read that the older pans were ground to a smooth surface and this is not done on most today. 

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RGSIII

My take is that even the better modern cast iron products, like Finex, seem to be second rate compared to Griswold, Wapak, Wagner, BSR, Martin and such.  Much more time and effort went into their production.

 

There are many different ways to clean your cast iron.  Some use brushes, things that look like putty knives, kosher salt and what is essentially a piece of chain mail.  They all have their proponents.  I go with the putty knife if something is really irregular.  Usually will use the mail like pad.  I use hot water, get the crud off, put it on the stove to burn off the water and spread some sort of oil or lard.  There are dozens of different ways cleaning cast iron.

 

I have dozens of cast iron pieces and find myself using a griddle most often

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Birdcountry70
On 1/8/2018 at 9:26 AM, kgb said:

I've read that the older pans were ground to a smooth surface and this is not done on most today. 

This thread got me curious about cast iron since I have had no experience with it. The other day I bought a Lodge 12" skillet and used it for the first time last night.  I was a bit suprised at how rough the finish is. I have found youtube videos  showing how people sand these down to make them smooth and then reseason.  Others have said that the rough finish isn't a problem and it will smooth out over time.  Has anyone here had a new Lodge pan smooth out from use? 

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Kansas Bound

It smooths out really quick and is a non-issue. People just like to find things to complain about.

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