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watermen

Creating grouse habitat quickly

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RuffChaser
14 hours ago, Peent said:

No I stay away from such riff raff.  

 

You do?

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watermen
8 hours ago, ScottGrush said:

Oak wilt in the area and you harvested the white oaks but left the reds. What's the rationale behind this? Reading your post again maybe these sites are hundreds of miles apart. 

Just curious. Your first photo in the original post looks like a red oak thinning trying to develop crown and regenerate some seedlings. 

The first photo is  a picture of what you describe 2 counties away from my land.  It's 150 acre cut and more open than the picture makes it look.    It's probably 25 miles from my property.  Very similar to my cut of the second forty. It has grown into good grouse habitat.  As I stated in post I drove over a 7 county area in 2 days looking at several pieces of property in various states of harvest and pre and post harvest.   Mine was opened up with landings in, but nothing going on.   I have 3 contiguous forties,  and one down the road about a half mile from the three to manage.  The oak wilt really took off in the area I'm at with each drought year.  I tried to save all of the older oak stands on mine, but oak wilt has come on through the neighbors side I believe through root systems.  I'm trying to cut off and save red oaks (black) we call them down in the ozarks.  They are disappearing here in Missouri,  mainly from overharvest and selective cutting  due to their value in furniture and floors.  I try to save red oak if I can.  The river piece has 29 big red oaks on it that will stay and are in a small area of glacial bog with humps that has seemed to isolate them during the drought.  They have remained relatively healthy while others around them did not.   
.   The 12 year old cut I spoke of, isolated a small grove of red oaks and 4 beech trees.  There is a lot of elevation change in small increments in the area I'm speaking of, due to glacial deposits.  I doubt I will succeed,  or live long enough to  even know if I had an impact.  There is no rational to what I am doing other than trying to preserve  something  getting rarer, while trying to remain  economically feasible for the loggers and me

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Peent
6 hours ago, watermen said:

There is no rational to what I am doing

You should get some professional forestry help.  The cost of bringing a FORESTER and not a LOGGER into the project will more than pay for itself.  Don't get the two mixed up.  

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watermen

I have a forester.   He does not agree with everything I do and I take his advice on most as he was the one pointing out the oak wilt.  I would rather gamble some of the red oaks make it than cut them and make sure they don't.  He and the loggers and my FIL all agree they should go.  So I agree, it is not necessarily rational to turn a valuable tree into firewood, but  I hope some of the red oaks make it.   They probably won't, but they might.

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