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Dongotto

Bringing the top lever right of center?

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Dongotto

I have a gun like the one in the video. Its tight on face but lever left of center. Has anyone tried the method from the video?

 

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Mike Connally

I haven’t tried it but I’d like to. Send me your gun. I have a vise and a two pound hammer. 

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Dongotto

To clarify the gun is a FN or Belgian guild gun that I picked up for 300 bucks about 10 years ago. It fits me perfect and I shoot it well so curious about a cheap fix for a cheap gun. No sure if it needs fixed? It looks up tight and when forearm is off still tight. I only shoot a box or two a year woodcock hunting and they are low pressure reloads. 

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Cooter Brown
39 minutes ago, Mike Connally said:

I haven’t tried it but I’d like to. Send me your gun. I have a vise and a two pound hammer. 

A really cool peening hammer like Mr. Rowe is using in the video?

 

20 minutes ago, Dongotto said:

To clarify the gun is a FN or Belgian guild gun that I picked up for 300 bucks about 10 years ago. It fits me perfect and I shoot it well so curious about a cheap fix for a cheap gun. No sure if it needs fixed? It looks up tight and when forearm is off still tight. I only shoot a box or two a year woodcock hunting and they are low pressure reloads. 

If it's still tight when the fore end is off I don't think it needs the treatment demonstrated.

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Don Steese
23 minutes ago, Cooter Brown said:

A really cool peening hammer like Mr. Rowe is using in the video?

 

If it's still tight when the fore end is off I don't think it needs the treatment demonstrated.

 

Exactly!!

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dogrunner

Not sure why he beat it with that hammer and then having to clean it up when he could of used a block. 

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tut

Never been a big fan of the hammer treatment.  Have seen some old Parker guns that have had the hook beaten to a pulp.  Micro-tig welding is what I've seen used most these days..

 

PS.  One fellow I know year ago put the hook sideways in a 10 ton hydralic vice and that moved enough metal that he could then dress it down and clean it up.  Still prefer the Micro-tig method of welding the hook and cleaning it up and then smoking it and dressing to down to get a good fit.  Not me personally of course because I have zero talent, but I well skilled at writing a check. 

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Dongotto

Who do you prefer Tut?

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WAGinVA

Dongotto,

If the gun is tight with the forearm off the position of the top lever is of NO consequence.  Take the forearm off, close the action and shake the gun while holding the stock, then shake it while holding the barrel, if it is truly tight and the action does not rattle the only thing you need to do is shoot the gun

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tut
8 hours ago, Dongotto said:

Who do you prefer Tut?

 

Micro-tig the hook adding metal, then trim it down carefully with various round files to get it close.  Then smoke it in getting it right.  This isn't hard stuff, it just takes lots of practice and having the right equipment.  Asked Dan Rossiter one time how long it takes to do put one back on face, and he said it all depends. Sometimes it goes well and then sometimes you remove too much metal and have to go back to square one and start the process all over again.  On some guns like a Fox, replacing the rotary bolt can solve the problem all by itself. 

 

Agree with WAGin VA taking the forearm off first. Then while the barrel is still attached to the frame/buttstock, grab the frame and shake it side to side with a fair amount of vigor.  If there is any side to side movement the gun is off face to a certain degree.  Pretty easy to spot one that really off face as you can even hear those.  Ones that are just a tad loose will normally feel pretty good once the forearm is put back on. 

 

PS.  Found this advertisement.  Have no information on the company at all, but it provides a bit of info:  http://www.microprecisionwelding.com/gun-repair

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Bill Calton

I guess Mr. Rowe, who knows a thing or two about British doubles, is not into that thing of easing closed and pushing the top lever over with your thumb.

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gunut

since Mr Rowe is no longer with us...don't think he really cares....but now thanks to Mr Rowe coming out gunsmiths can fix loose gun without first pulling the blinds down.....:ph34r:

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GB Jack

I’d be petrified to try that!!!!

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Cooter Brown
8 hours ago, Bill Calton said:

I guess Mr. Rowe, who knows a thing or two about British doubles, is not into that thing of easing closed and pushing the top lever over with your thumb.

He did some work for me--he used to be the AyA guy in the states.  He did a couple of strip and cleans and replaced a firing pin on my 4/53.

 

We actually talked a fair bit on the phone, and he mentioned people doing that.  He said. "They call it a snap action for a reason!  Close the damned gun so it's fully locked up!"

 

A lot of people treat a nice gun like delicate holy relic.  It's interesting to see the facility and ease with which Mr. Rowe handles and works on guns.  Puts things in perspective.

 

And by the way, when I've gotten my gun back from him it didn't look like it'd been touched--that's the way it's supposed to be but I can't say that about every gunsmith I've dealt with...

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tut
1 hour ago, Cooter Brown said:

He did some work for me--he used to be the AyA guy in the states.  He did a couple of strip and cleans and replaced a firing pin on my 4/53.

 

We actually talked a fair bit on the phone, and he mentioned people doing that.  He said. "They call it a snap action for a reason!  Close the damned gun so it's fully locked up!"

 

A lot of people treat a nice gun like delicate holy relic.  It's interesting to see the facility and ease with which Mr. Rowe handles and works on guns.  Puts things in perspective.

 

And by the way, when I've gotten my gun back from him it didn't look like it'd been touched--that's the way it's supposed to be but I can't say that about every gunsmith I've dealt with...

 

Interesting topic the closing of a double and riding the lever over with your thumb.  I was always taught years ago that's the way you do it.  Then I was up at the North East SXS event last year and saw some folks ride the lever over and others close them without touching the lever, but not snapping them shut with force and asked the question of Dan Rossiter.  He told me the correct way to close a double is not to slam it shut, but not to ride the lever with the thumb either.  Just close them somewhat slowly and let the lever snap over to where it should be and let the locking surfaces engage properly.

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