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OldSarge

Ammo Storage Solutions in the home?

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gunsrus
3 hours ago, Marc Ret said:

Ammo cans/ plastic containers locked in a job box in the basement for metallic, .22 and expensive non-lead (Bismuth, TM, etc.) shotgun ammo. 

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SAAMI Video building off rideold's post. 

I do the same in Ma and in Maine with expensive shells , metallic and 22's .  

I do have some 30-40 flats of shotgun shells stored in the garage attached to the house . It's not heated but the room above is and it never freezes in there . 

I got too much stuff !!!

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Birdcountry70

25/06 mentioned that in a fire the heavier bullet stays put and the brass would explode or go flying. This is what I have always read and heard, maybe the firefighter I read about was hit by flying brass etc.  I guess the article doesn't specifically say it was the bullet itself that struck him??? 

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airmedic1
On 1/5/2018 at 11:46 AM, Birdcountry70 said:

This is a timely thread since just last week a firefighter in a town south of me was hit in the arm when ammo in a burning trailer house  started exploding.  Apparently they were already hiding behind a pumper truck but somehow he got hit anyway.  My ammo is stacked like yours in a closet in my basement. I have been thinking that I need a better solution too. 

I have been in the fire service as a career firefighter for 25 years and have been involved with several structure fires that contained ammunition. I have examined dozens of rounds of metallic cartridges exposed to fire and most of the times, the cases splits and the bullet stays seated in the neck of the brass cartridge. 

The exploding ammo can be rather intimidating but is not dangerous to someone outside the structure. IF this firefighter was struck, I would guess it was because a round cooked off in a LOADED weapon of some type.  I have seen rounds cook off within the magazine of a handgun that  damaged the magazine but didn't destroy the handgun.  But the gun was damaged from the fire and only a fool would try to repair it and shoot it anyway.

I never leave a round in the chamber of any of my stored firearms so if my house burns there will be plenty of noise but no one is going to get hurt.

 

AM

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airmedic1
Posted (edited)
On 1/5/2018 at 11:46 AM, Birdcountry70 said:

This is a timely thread since just last week a firefighter in a town south of me was hit in the arm when ammo in a burning trailer house  started exploding.  Apparently they were already hiding behind a pumper truck but somehow he got hit anyway.  My ammo is stacked like yours in a closet in my basement. I have been thinking that I need a better solution too. 

 

Edited by airmedic1
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airmedic1
Posted (edited)
On 1/5/2018 at 11:46 AM, Birdcountry70 said:

This is a timely thread since just last week a firefighter in a town south of me was hit in the arm when ammo in a burning trailer house  started exploding.  Apparently they were already hiding behind a pumper truck but somehow he got hit anyway.  My ammo is stacked like yours in a closet in my basement. I have been thinking that I need a better solution too. 

 

Edited by airmedic1
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Marc Ret
On January 5, 2018 at 6:12 PM, gunsrus said:

 

I got too much stuff !!!

 

Nah. It's called being prepared. 

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stripersonfly

I know that if you reload, they suggest you store powder in a wooden cabinet, but one that would allow any gases from burning powder to escape easily.  I am sure metal cabinets would be fine as well, but just make sure they are vented so they can release gases in the event of a fire.  By containing the powder (or live ammunition), in a sealed metal container, you may allow pressures to build to a point where things are dangerous. 

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Randy S
5 hours ago, stripersonfly said:

I know that if you reload, they suggest you store powder in a wooden cabinet, but one that would allow any gases from burning powder to escape easily.  I am sure metal cabinets would be fine as well, but just make sure they are vented so they can release gases in the event of a fire.  By containing the powder (or live ammunition), in a sealed metal container, you may allow pressures to build to a point where things are dangerous. 

 

I recall a video of a metal safe and a 2" wooden box in a controlled burn. The paper currency in the metal box was ash and the paper in the wood box was unaffected.

 

 

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Tony Moore

excuse slight deviation from subject, I discovered 2 boxes of 20g left in my car trunk, current temp -20C, will it be OK, or is it now unsafe?

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dogrunner

It should be fine if it didn't get wet, cold shouldn't hurt it. 

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