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      TO THOSE REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UJ   01/06/2018

      To the Guests who have decided to register for Membership. PLEASE read Terms of Service, not just checking it off. This is covered there: Add more info than just "hunting" or "Upland hunting" or "birds" or "outdoors" or similar nebulous terms in the required INTERESTS field. Despite this Boards strong spam filtering function, some Spam registrations do sneak through. I need an inkling that you are a human being not a Spam Bot tagging onto key words. Also please do not use a business name as your User Name. Thank you.
MAArcher

Preparing for euthanasia

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Randy S

My vet euthanizes for their regular customers for free. He believes the experience is horrible enough that paying for it just makes a bad day worse. His recommendation is for the owner to not make an appointment. Just show up when your ready and they get you in and out in a matter of minutes. They only charge for cremation. I found it's much easier to not dread the decision and then rationalize why you should change your mind. I prefer his "no think" just act approach. And yeah, everyone cries.     

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CountryLife
On 1/6/2018 at 5:16 PM, greg jacobs said:

The last 5 or 6 I went in and did the paperwork and left the dogs in my pickup laying on the seat. She has me drive around back and she comes out and does it in the rig. Much better than hauling them inside. Going to sleep one last time in the hunting rig.

This isn't easy to talk about.

When I had to put down my Weim, the vet was very considerate in coming out to the truck bed as I held him one last time.  He hated going inside, so I was appreciative that at least he didn't have to get all worked up before hand.  I buried him at home and dug the hole ahead of time.  Very unpleasant all the way around, but part of life.

 

A nice surprise was about two weeks after, the vet sent a plaster cast of my dog's paw print with his name.  

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Wildcat

MA when I was younger I would have appreciated reading a post like this so that I did not make the mistakes I made having dogs euthanized. heck I did not even know you could have a vet come to the house until I was in my 30's. I hated taking the dog in because most of the time they did not like the vet and it was traumatic and made a sad situation much more uncomfortable :(

 

My current vet lights a candle in the waiting room which signifies he is euthanizing a pet and lets everyone know to be more respectful and quiet. I have not taken a dog to a vet to be euthanized in 20 years. I pay about $400 for a specialized vet to come to the house, this is all they do if you can believe it? It is much more relaxing for the dog. I am faced with putting down my old golden soon and will try the pheasant wing near his face so that he can smell it one last time. This thread gave me the idea. My eyes are tearing up, must be something in the air here in my office??? :( 

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bigdog MN

I had to use a emergency vet in September when my dog was not looking to make it until my vet opened.   I called to say I was coming and paid at the counter, gave instructions for cremation, etc before taking the dog out of the truck. They had the previously mentioned blanket on floor and did the paw in plaster. 

 

When I have known the time was coming and had time to prepare I prepay at my vet for everything. My dogs have all been cremated and I pre-select the urn and what I want on the nameplate. Appointments are at days end and I take that day and maybe some prior as vacation to spend with dog and prepare myself. If you have an emergency vet nearby I would check to see what they have for urns or cremation services in case you run into an unplanned visit. Luckily for me they offered the same services as my regular vet. Three out of five dogs have been unplanned events, so it pays to be prepared.

 

The Pheasant wing sounds like a good thing.

 

 

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kgb
Posted (edited)
On January 6, 2018 at 6:00 PM, salmontogue said:

consider the writings of Gene Hill, particularly Old Man, while remembering your departed canine partner.

 

Perk

I think you mean "Old Tom", but could be wrong. 

 

We lost a dog to kidney disease in 2010 and this last year a second to the same issue. Force-feeding pills and watching the wasting away as the dogs lose their appetite is no picnic, and we decided to let Skye go before she was fully wasted. Part of the decision was that we were going to be taking a 4-day trip to pick up a pup as a "replacement" for our older dog, who is 11, and would have a friend watching over the dogs while we were away. Skye barely ate for us, I doubted she'd eat for Gene at all. 

 

We left a couple days later, and it turned out to be very stressful for Beem. Skye was gone, my wife and I were very upset just prior to leaving home, and a friend was visiting him a few times per day. Beem managed to open the door to the garage twice, Gene found him barking in there. Another day he was in the spare bedroom where Skye often slept, barking at a wall and didn't hear Gene come in. Gene agreed to stay at the house until we got back, I feel very bad about leaving Beem for that time, never guessed the effect it would have. 

 

We lost Ranhe at nearly age 9, Skye was just past 7. 

 

As an aside, emergency vets here demand payment ahead of time for all services. From their point of view it makes sense for remaining in business. Our regular vet has been ours since 1994, for final visits they send a bill. 

 

 

Edited by kgb

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salmontogue
5 minutes ago, kgb said:

I think you mean "Old Tom", but could be wrong. 

 

We lost a dog to kidney disease in 2010 and this last year a second to the same thing. 

 

Yes, it is "Old Tom".  But the hunter was an old man so I guess my aging memory was not totally deficient...laughing.  Thanks for the clarification.

 

Perk

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Brad Eden

From my memorial Topic from 2009:

Jessi

 

She became very old and almost completely blind and deaf and slept most of the time. She had been going downhill lately but as long as her stub was wagging I knew it wasn’t time. Jessi’s stubby tail was always spinning, always, until early this morning. Jessi simply wanted to be with her people as long as she could. We kept her as long as we could. It was time to bring her to an emergency clinic at 4:30 this morning. Jo Ann and I held her when she went to sleep and before she was gone I let her nuzzle my beard like I did when she was just a tiny short-muzzled puppy.

 

From my Memorial Topic from 2012:

Jake

 

I carried him in and she worked on him for over an hour as I held an oxygen mask to his muzzle. Blood tests, x-rays, ultra sound. He was bleeding internally, his white blood cells and blood volume were drastically low. When I knew what was going to happen I called JoAnn at work and she headed to the vets office. They wanted to sedate him to lessen his stress and I asked not too much as I want him to recognize JoAnn. His tail wagged when she arrived and the vet explained things, that he apparently has had a tumor in his spleen that went unnoticed and had suddenly started hemorrhaging. She could go in but the prognosis was grim. At 12 years old the decision for us was easy and exceedingly hard. JoAnn held him and I knelt and held his head and looked him in the eyes, and a calm came over me and part of me left this earth with him.

 

I can't prepare myself for the end. I just try to know when it's time. All my dogs are cremated and are in wooden urns made by Cooter Brown. Why keep the ashes? Why not spread those ashes in bird covers or special places? When our Golden died and was cremated I had planned a ceremony with my two small daughters to bury the ashes on our property. They were strangely quiet, more than just sadness and grief. Finally one broke down crying and told me and Jo Ann that she thought Barney would rather stay with us. He does as will all my  dogs.

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shinbone

IMG_1690-XL.jpg

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UplandHntr
On 1/8/2018 at 9:47 AM, Randy S said:

My vet euthanizes for their regular customers for free. He believes the experience is horrible enough that paying for it just makes a bad day worse. His recommendation is for the owner to not make an appointment. Just show up when your ready and they get you in and out in a matter of minutes. They only charge for cremation. I found it's much easier to not dread the decision and then rationalize why you should change your mind. I prefer his "no think" just act approach. And yeah, everyone cries.     

 

Thats classy

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stevehaun

Several opinions - take them for what they are worth...

I think vets ask for payment while the iv is being placed because they don't want to "do the paperwork" right after the dog dies. There really is no good time to  "do the paperwork" other than to mail the bill.  I agree that the vet that euthanizes for free is classy.

I think many times dog owners wait too long to euthanize their dog and then it becomes an emergency - evening hours, weekend, etc.   We make this more about us and less about the dog.  The goal is to alleviate the dog's suffering but sometimes this is at odds with our suffering at their being gone.   Also, I think dog owners overcome with grief make some perceived slight by someone at the vets office the focus of their anger as a way of dealing with their grief.

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gordy

Rough time for all involved. Doesn't get any easier as you get older. Yes better planning for it than dealing with it when it happens especially in the dead of winter.

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Speedgoat44

Our older gsp is almost 16.  While not imminent, we realize that the end is likely not too far away.  My kids are very attached to this dog.  They notice the decline in the dog too and are distressed when it doesn't eat, is unsteady, etc..  They have shed many a tear thinking that she might be nearing the end of her life.  How would you recommend helping the kids through this difficult time?  We try to emphasize the positives and remind the kids to just enjoy the time they have with her rather than worry about when she is going to be gone.- we also remind them that the dog has lived a full and happy life, that we'll always have memories of the good times with her, and that we can decide as a family how to honor her, etc. I've only put one dog down and it was obviously really, really sad - almost too much for the kids to be present for I think.   Thanks for your input on this.

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gunsrus

A few months ago we lost our 16 yo GSP . We knew it was coming . Two , three months before he passed , he was demanding his treat time while I was sitting in the recliner . He was a "talker" and my wife had just given him his treat so he figured he could hit me up and get a second . I thought it was hilarious so I took a video talking back to him while he moaned and talked back demanding his treat . I was so happy after he passed that I had that video if for nothing else I was able to justify how vibrant and alive he was as opposed to the day we decided it was time . It really helped with the pain . 

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DonT

My Vet is is a small practice country Vet and comes to my house after office hours.  Last time, about 8 years ago, it was 9 pm on a Friday night, greeting him at the door, I thanked him and handed him $60, he said " let me know when you are ready".   I do believe in cultivating a relationship with my Vet, so every few years I have blood work/CBC done on one of the dogs.  This keeps me in contact with him, gives him some money and a base line of where the dog is at.  My old girl is a fighter and keeps coming back from the dark but I know this decision is coming sooner then I would like.  I will try not to wait to long but I fear I may. 

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DonT
10 hours ago, Speedgoat44 said:

Our older gsp is almost 16.  While not imminent, we realize that the end is likely not too far away.  My kids are very attached to this dog.

 

Besides explaining the cycle of life, what has helped me is having another dog or a puppy.  

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