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      TO THOSE REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UJ   01/06/2018

      To the Guests who have decided to register for Membership. PLEASE read Terms of Service, not just checking it off. This is covered there: Add more info than just "hunting" or "Upland hunting" or "birds" or "outdoors" or similar nebulous terms in the required INTERESTS field. Despite this Boards strong spam filtering function, some Spam registrations do sneak through. I need an inkling that you are a human being not a Spam Bot tagging onto key words. Also please do not use a business name as your User Name. Thank you.
Bobonli

Adding a Dog to a Working Family

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Brad Eden

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As far as a Springer...you can have a fully feathered one, shave him down to look like a GSP, hunt them elusive ruffed grouse, watch him and his little Cav sister climb trees after squirrels, or just hang out like couch potatoes. Seriously though, dogs are a lot of work no matter the breed, especially if gotten as puppies. There is no way around it. I'm lucky to be self employed, and typically spend a huge amount of time with them when they first come home, and have them house broken right off, and basic training begins almost immediately. IMO, a person has to commit a lot of time and effort to acclimate a dog to a household. If all falls into place, then you can't imagine ever living without a pooch in the palace ever again.

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shinbone
7 hours ago, braque du upstate said:

  You can be a weekend warrior.

 

Nothing wrong with being a weekend warrior.  Most of us are just that, anyway.  With just one season of a couple of perserve hunts, the OP doesn’t have enough experience to know whether he’ll rise to that honorable but modest level of commitment.  Not to mention that there is no downside to getting a little more experience/education on the subject before jumping in.

 

I got a mostly-non-hunting neighbor (hunted as a kid, but not since then) who wanted to go out with his son.  I happily took them on a few bird hunts.  It was all so easy:  you show up at the hunting spot, let the dog out, shoot some birds.  What isn't fun about that?

 

Over the summer he buys a lab from hunting lines and totally neglected it.  He didn't see it as neglect, because all you do is let the dog out of the truck and it finds birds for you, right?  Now, the dog is an out-of-control crazy maniac and the guy hates having this high energy furball tearing up his nice lawn.  The dog spends a lot of time in a crate to keep it from destroying stuff, never goes hunting because hunting your own dog is more work than the guy bargained for, and the only out-of-yard exercise it gets is when the wife feels sorry for it and takes it for a walk around the neighborhood every couple of months.  Not the dog’s fault, but it is the one paying the price for an owner who leapt before he looked.

 

JMHO

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UplandHntr

I did not read all 4 pages of responses.

how old are the kiddos?

 

while taking a dog for a walk or run every evening after work and dinner etc etc... the  extra benefit is excercise for anyone on the walk. Dont see it as just a chore for the dogs sake. 

 

Whatever breed you like.. this seems like a case to search for a well bred dog with a bit more laid back traits vs a high octane fire breather. 

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Spin
On ‎1‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 5:03 PM, Grifish said:

Echoing what you have already heard dogs need exercise and birddogs need more.  If you have ever watched Cesar Milan and his dog wisperer show the first fix he does on almost every episode is teach the dog’s people that a tired dog is a happy dog and a dog ready to learn.

 

My wife and I own field bred English cockers ours have a wonderful off switch, not all do. We also live in the suburbs, we run them at least 3x week.  If they don’t get enough exercise, they start being obnoxious and begin not to listen. I would say if you cannot dedicate at least 3hrs 3x a week don’t get a fbec. The other side of the coin is that you can do a lot of training in the back yard that will do wonders in the field.  Check out the book Urban Gundog.

 

We train with folks who work bench bred cockers, live in Brooklyn and a few of those dogs are fun to shoot over, but they aren’t fbecs. Benchies usually have a pretty good off switch, in fact their on switch can sometimes be hard to find.  You would really have a lot of research to find a good hunting bench bred Spaniel. Text me if you would like a lead or two.

 

A couple folks on this board own American Cockers, hopefully they will chime in as well.

You could be dead right but if you go back to the 50's, 60's and at least the early 70's Britt's held more dual champions than any other ACK registered breed. Granted Brittany's are now considered in a breed category by themselves and no longer as a Spaniel. The AKC (or their parent club) also labeled them as the only pointing spaniel which we know  "Is Not True" .(I am currently waiting for the ground to shake and the lightning bolt to strike me down for uttering such heresy) I'm pretty sure the AKC and other such organizations scattered hither and yon around the world have made similar errors. I'm also similarly positive that Notable Bench lines can and do produce extremely talented dogs now and again.

     (Just Sayin')

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Randy S

No more than you do or have hunted, you don't want or need a high performance dog. For a laid back, house companion, that won't embarrass you in the field, get yourself a Lab puppy from a small line. With just a little instinct, they train themselves and you can take the energy edge off in a few minutes a day just tossing bumpers. For a first bird/house dog Labs can't be beat. Yes, there are Labs with energy levels that rival an Olympian, but most are content laying around the house scarfing snacks from the kids and playing house bound hide and seek with a bumper.    

 

I say puppy because you have kids. Kids don't take to adult dogs like they do pups and pups are so cute they gain forgiveness that's more difficult to grant to a misbehaving adult. 

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DonT

Decide what type of dog you want, pointer or a flusher and ask the board for breeders.  Look around for local support for training.  

 

NAVHDA     Rock Tavern chapter - NY    

Long Island Pointing Dog Field Trial Club

Long Island Retriever Club

The 2 Long Island clubs may be too hard core for you but gun dog people are good people and will help find what you need. 

 

I'm  close enough to help you some if you need it, I have a Griffon, there may be others even closer.  Lots of good people on this board, although none remember getting their first hunting dog.  

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Bobonli

 A sincere and giant Thank You to everyone. So much good advice to sort through and consider.

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LabHunter

You can definitely do it.  You might have to give the dog some priority, especially when it is young, but you can definitely do it if you are motivated to do so.  Get the dog you really want - most of us only buy a dog once a decade or thereabouts and it's worth it to get one that checks all the boxes.  Pick out a good breeder and make sure the parents are dogs you would like to own, then see which pup picks you.

 

You didn't honestly think you would come to an upland hunting site and get people telling you not to buy a puppy, did you??

 

Have fun and post lots of pics!

Trev

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Flush

Definitely take your time and make an effort to see as many different types of dogs in action as you can before deciding. Flushers are very different from pointers and within each style there are huge variations....heck some breeds have huge variations. Dogs are great critters and most likely you will be "happy" with whatever you get....but it's something you will have for hopefully 10+ years. It's not uncommon for guys to go from complete novice bird-hunter to avid hunter in far less time than 10 years. Do as much in person research as you can before deciding. It's not easy to see a bunch of different types of dogs in action, but IMHO you are doing yourself an injustice if you haven't seen at least all the more popular breeds in action before making a choice.

 

 

 

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