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    • Brad Eden

      TO THOSE REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UJ   01/06/2018

      To the Guests who have decided to register for Membership. PLEASE add more info than just  "hunting" or "Upland hunting" or "birds" or "outdoors" or similar nebulous terms in the required INTERESTS field. Despite this Boards strong spam filtering it is not bullet proof, so Spam registrations do sneak through. I need an inkling that you are a warm blooded human being not a Spam Bot tagging onto key words. Thank you.
salmontogue

Everyone is not a collector so.........

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Urban_Redneck

I hunt most often with 1902 vintage sidelock. When I'm feeling nostalgic I grab an 1880 vintage snap (triggerplate) action under lever from the same maker. I had both sleeved over twenty years ago.

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Field Grade
2 hours ago, TimJ said:

I am pretty much a lover of classic utility. 

Tim sums it up.

 

I am pretty tough on gear and guns so I just want something simple that functions well in all conditions. 

 

A field grade American double from the '20s-'40s (i.e., built for modern nitro pressures) is all I need.

 

I like Ithacas since that's what I started hunting with as a kid. And there's something about carrying a 90-year-old gun that was manufactured a stone's throw from some of your bird covers.

 

I like break-action doubles since they are easy to load and unload, especially when you sit down on a stone wall to eat a sandwich, or when you cross a barbwire fence. 

 

They are dependable and have good lines -- some moreso than others.

 

Fly fishing writers have said cane rods -- classic-era sticks from the 1920s 'til the embargo -- were pretty much the pinnacle of fly rods. Graphite is good but does not have the feel or soul. With cane they say you can feel the heartbeat of the trout you hook.

 

I like blue-collar production rods from those days, like Heddons. 

 

Hardware store shotguns from between the wars are the hunting equivalent to cane.

 

Someday I will own a higher-graded subgauge Fox, when the kid is out of college and the house is paid off.

 

For now I'll stick with field grade guns with most of the blueing gone and scratched stocks.

 

The grouse don't seem to care as far as what gun is swinging on them.

 

rjj 

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lee sykes

My reasons for using different guns have varied over time.  Of course they all work or they wouldn't be here.  In the end, they are tools, just like guitars are tools. I enjoy having  a choice among several while using either. That's part of the fun for me.  I like to have the best that I can afford a few examples of.   Not interested in having "the best"  nor do I care what is and is not.  Enjoy educating myself about these tools so that I have a pretty good idea what's good yet affordable (to me).  I like old guns and I like new guns but I want walnut and steel. I face the truth that we all face that I am at best, simply their caretaker for a few years.

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Greg Hartman

 

I guess you could say that I shoot/hunt with a combination of "recent modern" (have a400 Beretta's in 12, 20 and 28 - used mostly on the range, but I hunt the 28 with some frequency), "semi-modern" (the bespoke AyA 28 gauge and the bespoke Famars guns, including my favorite go-to 20 gauge bird gun), and "American classic" guns (the 16 bore M12 and the re-done old M42), tho' they weren't classics when I acquired them long ago.  But if "recent modern" means black plastic "tactical" shotguns, I don't have any of those.  Guns are something I really enjoy - they are more than just tools to me.  Using a gun I like and that appeals aesthetically to me adds to the enjoyment of a day afield or a day at the range for me.  I very much like the guns I have and am unlikely to upgrade or change from where I'm at - a good thing because I can no longer afford that sort of thing anyway.

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Randy S

As several have stated, walnut and blued steel, but I'll add used. No interest in new guns. I like personal history when in the field or the shop. I'd rather miss every bird 1,000 miles from home with the guns I've carried since the 70's than kill a limit every weekend with a gun without blemishes. 

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MTPipeliner

I don’t have any old or classic guns in my collection, and no hand me downs from family.  I shoot my Benelli m2 as well or better than any other gun I have so it’s my go to gun for most trips.  

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Auto-5

The new synthetic anodized aluminum shrouded repeaters don’t hold much for me shotgun wise I tend to enjoy the guns that I admired as a kid that were the rage at the little trap club in our small town in the 60s That means model12s, Auto -5s , and Remington’s1100s and 870s which were relative new then. Our town wasn’t rich enough to have many graded doubles and superposed guns. Rifles I have a couple of Rutgers a 77 with a reworked stock (slimmed, recheckered and ebony forend cap) and a #1. Pistols have sort of lost my interest  though I manage to hold onto my K38 and kit gun. In the end I have no real desire to own guns worth thousands I think my guns are nice and valuable to me but to another man they are  cheap guns as most wouldn’t exceed $1000 in value. The end result is I enjoy them and they shoot well for me and collect game quite efficiently so that’s whats important ymmv.

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kgb

American repeaters, all 3 categories, cover all needs for me. 

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jeff88

Perk, to answer specifically, semi-modern or modern.  

 

At my age, some of my new guns are now semi-modern...

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jeff88
On 1/7/2018 at 10:17 PM, Field Grade said:

I like Ithacas since that's what I started hunting with as a kid. And there's something about carrying a 90-year-old gun that was manufactured a stone's throw from some of your bird covers.

Our son went to Cornell.  One of the 1st things I did when I took him for his school visit was to find the old Ithaca factory building.  It was heart-breaking to see the smashed windows, the building falling apart - this was the building pictured in some of their ads in F&S, OL and SA in the 60's.  Not sure if it still stands.  What made me sadder was the thought that this type of manufacturing was dying out in towns all across the country.

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gunsrus
30 minutes ago, jeff88 said:

Our son went to Cornell.  One of the 1st things I did when I took him for his school visit was to find the old Ithaca factory building.  It was heart-breaking to see the smashed windows, the building falling apart - this was the building pictured in some of their ads in F&S, OL and SA in the 60's.  Not sure if it still stands.  What made me sadder was the thought that this type of manufacturing was dying out in towns all across the country.

Cornell ..... quite an accomplishment , something to be very proud of .

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jeff88
27 minutes ago, gunsrus said:

Cornell ..... quite an accomplishment , something to be very proud of .

Thanks!  Both kids did very well in school and have been off the payroll for years.  My wife is the brains and the looks.  

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Chukarman

Most of my side by side bird guns are older guns... made between 1898 and 1930. My Model 21 duck gun was made in 1947. 

 

Manufacture dates of my O/U guns is much more recent - between 1937 (early Browning Super) and 1995 (Perazzi MX20). 

 

Never thought about this before, but the SxS guns came to perfection of design and manufacture earlier than the O/U guns. 

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charlo slim
1 hour ago, Chukarman said:

Never thought about this before, but the SxS guns came to perfection of design and manufacture earlier than the O/U guns. 

 

Yes, much the same as with buggies and automobiles.:ph34r:

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bkelble

I hunt with functional guns. If I had the money, they would also be beautiful... but I teach, so I doubt that is going to happen. I do have a variety though. Usually, I carry a 20 gauge Ithica Flues model from 1911. Sometimes it's a .410 Iver Johnson Champion from the 40s (if I recall correctly). My go to guns in the past were a Mossberg 500 and a Stoger Confondor in 20. None of them are beautiful, but they all get the job done. 

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