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salmontogue

Another Kind of Cast Iron

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salmontogue

Glenwood E with gas sidecar (oven and three burners) in everyday use in addition to a modern double oven Vulcan restaurant style gas range.

 

Does this qualify for cool factor?

 

Perk

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Irishwhistler

Perk,

Great kitchen. 👍👍👍👍👍👌

 

Mike 🍀

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polecat

Yes,It does.

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salmontogue
9 hours ago, Irishwhistler said:

Perk,

Great kitchen. 👍👍👍👍👍👌

 

Mike 🍀

 

Thanks Mike and Polecat.  Our "camp" (Maine terminology for lake house) has a Glenwood Sunny kitchen stove fired by wood only where the Glenwood E is fired by wood with the gas sidecar.  The Glenwood Parlor stove has cherubs and a hunting dog cast on the front door.  It loads up to 24" wood from the side and is a powerful heater.  It will easily heat several thousand square feet.  I enjoy sitting nearby while reading...the feel is wonderful particularly with the front door open.

 

Glenwood stoves were manufactured by the Weir Stove Company in Taunton Massachusetts.  They later changed their name to, simply, Glenwood.  The building pictured was built in 1902 and is the second of two manufacturing plants.  It is now owned by the FB Rogers Company which manufactures sterling silver flatware and serving pieces.

 

The fourth photo is a Mount Kineo, named after Kineo Mountain on the island of the same name in Moosehead Lake near Rockwood, Maine.  I bought it about eight years ago but have not started the restoration process which is fun but incredibly filthy...sandblasting, welding and spray painting.  It was made by the Noyes & Nutter Co. in Bangor, Maine.

 

All the stoves are over one hundred years old.

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Don Steese

That parlor stove is too cool for words!! 

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salmontogue
2 minutes ago, Don Steese said:

That parlor stove is too cool for words!! 

 

Thanks Don  I had a screen made for it by a stove company in Bangor that allows it to be safely run with the front door open.  During what I jokingly call my cast iron phase, a friend and I restored a half dozen stoves.  I kept mine, he sold his.  I have been putting off the restoration of the Kineo because it is such a filthy job.  Perhaps 2018 is the year.

 

My doublegun phase has been roaring along for about six decades.

 

Perk

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Field Grade

Perk,

 

Those are exquisite, functional pieces of Americana.

 

Built like battleships, built to warm the whole house.

 

Here is one from a farmhouse we rent in upstate N.Y. I like firing it up early in the morning...listening to it tick as it comes to life. When it gets up to temperature it throws enough heat to melt a glacier.

 

 

glenwood stove.jpg

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fourtrax57

Great thread!

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salmontogue
5 hours ago, Field Grade said:

Perk,

 

Those are exquisite, functional pieces of Americana.

 

Built like battleships, built to warm the whole house.

 

Here is one from a farmhouse we rent in upstate N.Y. I like firing it up early in the morning...listening to it tick as it comes to life. When it gets up to temperature it throws enough heat to melt a glacier.

 

 

glenwood stove.jpg

 

I  love it.  The copper boiler too.

 

Perk

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salmontogue
8 hours ago, fourtrax57 said:

Great thread!

 

Thank you.  Do you see many antique wood stoves in your area?

 

Perk

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fourtrax57

Few.

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walt lister

I'm insanely jealous, great kitchen. I remember visiting my mothers grandmother in Pittsburg Kansas around 1950. She had an old farmhouse with a hand pump at the sink but also had a gleaming huge cast iron stove with nickel and blue porcelain trim. Don't know what ever happened to it. My mother talked about that stove for years.

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salmontogue
52 minutes ago, walt lister said:

I'm insanely jealous, great kitchen. I remember visiting my mothers grandmother in Pittsburg Kansas around 1950. She had an old farmhouse with a hand pump at the sink but also had a gleaming huge cast iron stove with nickel and blue porcelain trim. Don't know what ever happened to it. My mother talked about that stove for years.

 

My great uncle on my mother's side (Mothers fathers brother) had a Morris chair behind the cast iron cook stove in his kitchen where he spent many hours reading.  He was in the cranberry business and the bog shacks all used cast iron stoves during the cold months.  He died the year I was born so my knowledge of him is what has been passed down to me.

 

Information on him here  http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=G000169

 

I should add that he was a fanatic bird hunter.

 

Perk

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Millriver

Our Glenwood C in our kitchen. My wife grew up with this stove in her childhood home. We burn approximately 3.5 cords of wood each winter in this. 95% of our cooking is done on this from November-March, including the Thanksgiving and Christmas turkeys. Our female Cocker, Bella, spends most of the winter under this stove. My males can't fit!

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watermen

Great thread, the only experience I have with one was my great grandmothers in her kitchen.

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