Jump to content
FRIENDLY REMINDER ABOUT HUNTING REPORTS/TOPICS... Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
salmontogue

Another Kind of Cast Iron

Recommended Posts

salmontogue
38 minutes ago, Millriver said:

Our Glenwood C in our kitchen. My wife grew up with this stove in her childhood home. We burn approximately 3.5 cords of wood each winter in this. 95% of our cooking is done on this from November-March, including the Thanksgiving and Christmas turkeys. Our female Cocker, Bella, spends most of the winter under this stove. My males can't fit!

IMG_2055.JPG

IMG_2613.JPG

 

I love the dog under the stove pic.  We had a Siamese that did exactly the same.  It gets hot under there to the point of smoking fur.  My great uncle set himself on fire sitting in his Morris chair behind his kitchen stove, before my time.  He claimed it was from his pipe.  Either way he was teased about it incessantly even by several of his congressional aides.  Funny stuff.

 

Perk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Millriver

One learns very quickly NOT to wear polar fleece pants while cooking pancakes and eggs on a Glenwood stove!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
salmontogue
Just now, Millriver said:

One learns very quickly NOT to wear polar fleece pants while cooking pancakes and eggs on a Glenwood stove!

 

Most any synthetics can give you a burn.  Woodstove cooking is a learned skill but hugely satisfying.  We use ours every day.  Wood heat is satisfying and relaxing combined with sleeping dogs, a comfortable chair, good reading material and a favorite drink.

 

Perk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lee sykes

Perk,  that brings back some fond memories . Not Just of the "Modern Glenwood  Wood Parlor"  that was in my maternal grandparent's parlor but of my first dog, a buff colored, female cocker.  That chrome plated rail was perfect for warming cold feet.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yukon1

Looks similar to the stove my wife grew up with as a kid.  She says that during the "Blizzard of '78" some of the families in her neighborhood had to move in to her house for several days until power was restored. It was one of the few homes that still had heat and a means to cook. She also said it was a fun time for the kids, not so much for adults...

 

When her folks had passed we had to clean out the house and ended up selling the stove to an antiques dealer. We got, what we considered, was a good price for it, but nothing near what these stoves are going for now. 

 

Love your kitchen. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vabirddog

My Grandmother had a massive cook stove in her house as did my oldest aunt. We have a large Home Comfort cooker at our cabin. We are lucky to be able to get furniture/cabinet remnants for fuel as splitting large amounts of stove wood is a chore. Slabs were the preferred fodder back when but they are long gone but for hobby sawyers now. It is an absolute Art to turn out a meal on a cook stove!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Millriver
1 hour ago, Yukon1 said:

Looks similar to the stove my wife grew up with as a kid.  She says that during the "Blizzard of '78" some of the families in her neighborhood had to move in to her house for several days until power was restored. It was one of the few homes that still had heat and a means to cook. She also said it was a fun time for the kids, not so much for adults...

 

When her folks had passed we had to clean out the house and ended up selling the stove to an antiques dealer. We got, what we considered, was a good price for it, but nothing near what these stoves are going for now. 

 

Love your kitchen. 

When my inlaws sold their house in '85, we were given our Glenwood. We had it for sale briefly but we decided to keep it. Thank goodness! We kept it in storage for 13 years, and when we bought our house we had a chimney and a hearth built for it. Wouldn't be without it now.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
salmontogue
1 hour ago, Yukon1 said:

Looks similar to the stove my wife grew up with as a kid.  She says that during the "Blizzard of '78" some of the families in her neighborhood had to move in to her house for several days until power was restored. It was one of the few homes that still had heat and a means to cook. She also said it was a fun time for the kids, not so much for adults...

 

When her folks had passed we had to clean out the house and ended up selling the stove to an antiques dealer. We got, what we considered, was a good price for it, but nothing near what these stoves are going for now. 

 

Love your kitchen. 

 

We spend a fair amount of time in the kitchen.  Thanks for the compliment.  Stoves are like the gun market, ups and downs and changes in taste.  Thirty years ago, antique stoves were not popular particularly in light of reproductions and nice old looking but modern products like the fine Vermont Castings offerings.  The older stoves were regarded as air leakers.  Any old stove can be resealed to cut down on air leaks but the reality of life is that no wood burning stove is really "air tight".  When the buying public caught on to the airtight claims, new interest began to increase with the old stoves and restoration shops sprung up to meet the demand.  The good part of this is the many unrestored examples that are languishing in cellars and barns.  There are bargains but sweat equity is required.  I have retrieved several from dumps.

 

It is just so exciting to be warmed and to cook on stoves over one hundred years old.

 

Perk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Randy S

Thanks to this thread I've spent a couple of hours filtering through pictures and websites featuring these stoves. I had no idea that such ornate models were produced. I saw a few cast iron wood burners growing up here in Iowa but nothing like what you have out east. I have to say I'm ashamed of the junk that today's manufacturers produce in kitchen appliances compared to the quality of 75-100 years ago.  

 

If I wasn't so old and swimming with alligators, I'd be looking for one to refurbish myself. Someone please save them all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
watermen
1 hour ago, Randy S said:

Thanks to this thread I've spent a couple of hours filtering through pictures and websites featuring these stoves. I had no idea that such ornate models were produced. I saw a few cast iron wood burners growing up here in Iowa but nothing like what you have out east. I have to say I'm ashamed of the junk that today's manufacturers produce in kitchen appliances compared to the quality of 75-100 years ago.  

 

If I wasn't so old and swimming with alligators, I'd be looking for one to refurbish myself. Someone please save them all!

I inquired since reading this post and there are cheap and easy to come by antiques down here in the Ozarks.  Several of the locals run them up north between us to the aimish, who buy them all.  I have yet to see anything as ornate or pretty as those eastern examples shown.  I agree they are all worth saving as true americana.  One of my coworkers has 2 in her garage, I'm fixin to trade. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BlacknTan

Love those old Glenwood stoves!

 

Here's a photo from 2004 showing a previous Gordon, Holly, as a pup, with her head near under an operating Vermont Castings.. I don't know how she stood the heat!

 

trsqAtq.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kansas Bound

Thanks Perk for the motivation. I built a rack to hang some of my cast iron.

IMG_20180113_185720_528.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
salmontogue
23 minutes ago, Kansas Bound said:

Thanks Perk for the motivation. I built a rack to hang some of my cast iron.

IMG_20180113_185720_528.jpg

 

Extremely attractive design and well executed.  I like it.

 

Perk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frak

Cool factor is set at 11. Looks like you could bend a few horse shoes after breakfast with the stove too.

 

what an interesting thread this is!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×