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salmontogue

Another Kind of Cast Iron

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Millriver

As John Denver sang, " sun's coming up I've got cakes on the griddle". Thank god I'm a country boy!

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Spin
On ‎1‎/‎8‎/‎2018 at 7:08 PM, salmontogue said:

 

Thanks Mike and Polecat.  Our "camp" (Maine terminology for lake house) has a Glenwood Sunny kitchen stove fired by wood only where the Glenwood E is fired by wood with the gas sidecar.  The Glenwood Parlor stove has cherubs and a hunting dog cast on the front door.  It loads up to 24" wood from the side and is a powerful heater.  It will easily heat several thousand square feet.  I enjoy sitting nearby while reading...the feel is wonderful particularly with the front door open.

 

Glenwood stoves were manufactured by the Weir Stove Company in Taunton Massachusetts.  They later changed their name to, simply, Glenwood.  The building pictured was built in 1902 and is the second of two manufacturing plants.  It is now owned by the FB Rogers Company which manufactures sterling silver flatware and serving pieces.

 

The fourth photo is a Mount Kineo, named after Kineo Mountain on the island of the same name in Moosehead Lake near Rockwood, Maine.  I bought it about eight years ago but have not started the restoration process which is fun but incredibly filthy...sandblasting, welding and spray painting.  It was made by the Noyes & Nutter Co. in Bangor, Maine.

 

All the stoves are over one hundred years old.

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Outstanding job! Kudos. Tell me, you mentioned welding and generally speaking I take it the welding was on the Cast Iron stove body.

Not an easy win by any means. ( well earned reputation for cracking in the cast iron very close to the weld ) Usually cast iron welding requires preheating, commonly requires nickel rod and slow cooling. Stress relief peening may help. That big honking cast iron body had to have been one Biggg heat sink too.

may help. Am I in the ball park so far? Anyway if the welding was done on a visible area did you run into trouble with covering the weld compared to

the adjoining iron? 

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salmontogue
53 minutes ago, Spin said:

Outstanding job! Kudos. Tell me, you mentioned welding and generally speaking I take it the welding was on the Cast Iron stove body.

Not an easy win by any means. ( well earned reputation for cracking in the cast iron very close to the weld ) Usually cast iron welding requires preheating, commonly requires nickel rod and slow cooling. Stress relief peening may help. That big honking cast iron body had to have been one Biggg heat sink too.

may help. Am I in the ball park so far? Anyway if the welding was done on a visible area did you run into trouble with covering the weld compared to

the adjoining iron? 

 

You obviously know welding and know that welding cast iron is a major PIA.  Any cracked decorative pieces that show, I replaced when I could get replacement parts because the bead is pretty much impossible to hide.  I used nickel type rod and preheated before making the first pass with techrod 99 and subsequent passes with techrod 55.  The entire process can be frustrating requiring some do-overs and re-grinding.  Peening is essential along with slow cooling.  The preheat takes forever with large pieces.  Interior pieces that will rust with use can be welded with a ferroweld type rod.  I did this in a three-sided shed with a 300Amp engine driven Lincoln and an oxy-acetylene set up and a large heater.  Welding was done at low amperage.

 

I had previously worked on antique cars and trucks and had experience with gas, stick, mig and tig welding.  Cast iron was a whole new ballgame requiring great care to prevent cracking next to the bead.  It was a major learning process although I already knew sandblasting and spray painting from automotive projects.  The filth level is extreme. 

 

You are totally in the ballpark, homerun even.

 

Perk

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Rockdoc

Back in 1975 my late wife and I purchased an old cottage in Menlo Park CA that had a gas 4-burner range top and oven with a wood burning two burner range top and a small oven alongside. It had a white finish and for all practical purposes looked just like any other mid-20th century appliance except for the wood burning aspect. The area was very rural back in the 1930's when the cottage was built. I was continuously finding horse shoes and such in the adjoining vacant lot that came with it.

 

Steve 

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