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Greg Hartman

2018 Hunting Photos - Let's see 'em!

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Greg Hartman

Since we are now well into 2018, I thought it was time to start a 2018 hunting photo thread.

 

Heading out on a windy 1 degree morning:

 

1-3-18 - Chase and Joy heading out early on a 1 degree morning

 

 

Grouse 28 hunting a fence row with Ti and Drummer:

 

1-3-18 - Dave on a bitter cold morning

 

 

Chase with an ice beard - I had one, too.  :)

 

1-3-18 - The Chaser at work

 

 

Birds were few and far between but Joy managed to find one and give me a nice point - my elderly buddy made the retrieve:

 

1-3-18 = Chase retreiving first bird of 2018

 

 

Mandatory  bird-n-gun pic:

 

1-3-18 - First bird of 2018

 

 

The cold must have sapped the dogs because neither moved on the way home - none of the usual "Are we there YET???!!" behavior.

 

1-3-18 - Tired dogs on the way home in the Jeep

 

The weather was much less harsh for this day's outing - about 32 degrees - after the past couple of weeks, it felt like spring.  Chase and a goon afield.  Maybe she was trying to fly?

 

1-9-18 - A goon afield

 

 

There haven't been any put-n-take hunts for some weeks, so scratch birds were very rare.  Joy did manage to find what turned out to be a rooster with a crop full of corn.  I was able to snatch a pic of the point this time.  Joy pointing the rooster in a tree line and Chase honoring her point:

 

1-9-18 - Joy point Chase honor

 

 

Chase made the retrieve:

 

1-9-18 - Chase retreive

 

 

The required bird with gun pic:

 

1-9-18 - Today's harvest

 

 

Hope you enjoyed coming along.  Red Gods willing, hopefully there will be many more birds between now and 12/31/18.

 

Now, let's see your 2018 hunting photos!!

 

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SaltCityJeff

Greg I am serious when I tell you that you ought to investigate some of these "stock photography" sales sites. Your composition, your subject matter, your post production editing - everything just seem to always work for you. You have a great eye for it and you are able to consistently reproduce great shots after great shots. I could see businesses buying up some of this for use in advertising or other areas. (Think Cabela's, Bass, Orvis, etc)

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Willieb

Thought you folks in the cold white north might like to see what it looks like in South Georgia without the white stuff. 

IMG_0990.JPG

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Jack L

The last weekend of pheasant season was crowded here. It’s what temperatures in the 30’s will do after subzero weather. Everybody and their brother were out chasing birds.

 

Clancy and I were hard pressed to find a place over the weekend that wasn’t being hunted, had just been hunted or had someone jump in on us.  

 

The birds were not to be found hunting public ground. Saturday never saw a rooster. Sunday saw birds in the middle of open fields as I was driving. Otherwise Clancy found another cripple.

 

 

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This guy was found by something else.  You can see the tail still sticking out on the right side of the feather pile.

 

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I thought about taking Monday off and having a last hurrah, but decided walking about 13 miles, getting hunted on top of or not having a place to hunt as well as not seeing a rooster was not worth it.  

 

A tough year numbers wise but had some great hunts .

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Greg Hartman
1 hour ago, SaltCityJeff said:

Greg I am serious when I tell you that you ought to investigate some of these "stock photography" sales sites. Your composition, your subject matter, your post production editing - everything just seem to always work for you. You have a great eye for it and you are able to consistently reproduce great shots after great shots. I could see businesses buying up some of this for use in advertising or other areas. (Think Cabela's, Bass, Orvis, etc)

 

You are very kind; and I thank you for the gracious comments; but I enjoy trying to share what I see and feel in the field by making images.  Always being on the lookout for an artsy image allows me to really SEE things I'd probably miss otherwise when I'm out.  If I accepted money for that, it would be ruined.  Long ago when I was working my way through school on the GI Bill, while trying to support a wife and (pretty soon) two kids, I worked as a free-lance photographer.  Got to HATE it.  Didn't pick up a camera again for 25+ years.  Don't want that to happen again.  I'm just glad you like my humble efforts.

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Greg Hartman

It was warmer today and we got out for a few hours.  Still no released bird hunts and I've been slowly picking off the few birds there are, so birds are scarce and we had to cover quite a few miles for our birds today.  Joy was really "on" - here she is pointing into the sun what turned out to be a really nice fat rooster in a sparse tree line, with The Chaser honoring.

 

1-10-18 - Joy point Chase honor - 2

 

 

As usual, my old buddy did the retrieving:

 

1-10-18 - Chase retreive

 

 

I carried the 28 gauge a400 today because I wanted to be able to use the sling to free up my hands for some decent photography and the gun is so light it's about as close to not carrying a gun as you can get and still be able to kill birds.  It's far from a "fine" gun, but is just about ideal for this purpose; and the 3/4 oz B&P cartridges with #6 are plenty.  Today's harvest:

 

1-10-18 - Todays harvest with the 28 gauge a400

 

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SaltCityJeff
16 hours ago, Greg Hartman said:

You are very kind; and I thank you for the gracious comments; but I enjoy trying to share what I see and feel in the field by making images.  Always being on the lookout for an artsy image allows me to really SEE things I'd probably miss otherwise when I'm out.  If I accepted money for that, it would be ruined.  Long ago when I was working my way through school on the GI Bill, while trying to support a wife and (pretty soon) two kids, I worked as a free-lance photographer.  Got to HATE it.  Didn't pick up a camera again for 25+ years.  Don't want that to happen again.  I'm just glad you like my humble efforts.

 

I completely understand that! I had the very conversation yesterday that I used to love and was passionate about all things technology. Then it became my career and 20 years into it, aside from using the internet at home for things like the forum, shopping and researching a few things and streaming TV/Movies - I avoid the things I used to be passionate about and loved because I have to do them 8+ hours a day. I've been asked at times in my life why I didn't pursue things like woodworking and what not and I have always cited the exact answer above that I don't want to lose my love and passion for those things that bring me happiness and peace when I want. 

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Greg Hartman
3 hours ago, SaltCityJeff said:

 

I completely understand that! I had the very conversation yesterday that I used to love and was passionate about all things technology. Then it became my career and 20 years into it, aside from using the internet at home for things like the forum, shopping and researching a few things and streaming TV/Movies - I avoid the things I used to be passionate about and loved because I have to do them 8+ hours a day. I've been asked at times in my life why I didn't pursue things like woodworking and what not and I have always cited the exact answer above that I don't want to lose my love and passion for those things that bring me happiness and peace when I want. 

 

Turning a hobby into a business happened to me with flintlock gunmaking, too.  I should have known better after the photography situation, but I guess I didn't. 

 

Long ago, I learned the basics of flintlock rifle making.  I've enjoyed making rifles (some smoothbores, too) for most of my life, when the urge moved me.  It would often take me a couple of years to complete a gun.  I kept them to shoot for a while then usually passed them to friends who were avid flintlock shooters when I had too many.  Other people saw my guns at shoots and such and were very complementary.  Of course, that was flattering to me, because I saw myself as very much of an amateur wood and metal butcher.  People began to ask me to make them guns and offered what I thought were some pretty nice commissions.  Eventually I caved and took on some commissions.  At first, I liked the idea of being a "professional gunmaker", but it wasn't long before I realized I had made a mistake.  Now I was building what somebody else wanted instead of what had caught my own interest at the time, plus I had a deadline - this gun needed done by X date - instead of just working on guns when I felt like it, I was under pressure.  I also felt great pressure to make a perfect product (and nothing handmade is ever completely perfect).  My stress level was going up and my health down over the gunmaking business more than it did in running my 30 person law firm.  

 

Not only that, but it was a financial disaster.  After buying the parts and putting the hundreds of hours into each gun. I was probably netting about $2.00/hour to do something that was no longer fun.  No sane person practices law for fun, but at least my hourly rate for that work was many, many times better than the gunmaking.

 

So, no photography "business".  If people (especially those who are not dogmen/hunters) who view my images enjoy them and get a sense of what the upland life is all about, that's all I want or need.  As of today, I've had 215,180 visitors to the Flickr site I started in 2016 - most of which are likely non-hunters from all over the world - and they seem to like what they see as I have not yet gotten even one negative comment and many favorable comments.  I figger that has to be good for our sport - payment enough for me.

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SaltCityJeff
1 hour ago, Greg Hartman said:

 

Turning a hobby into a business happened to me with flintlock gunmaking, too.  I should have known better after the photography situation, but I guess I didn't. 

 

Long ago, I learned the basics of flintlock rifle making.  I've enjoyed making rifles (some smoothbores, too) for most of my life, when the urge moved me.  It would often take me a couple of years to complete a gun.  I kept them to shoot for a while then usually passed them to friends who were avid flintlock shooters when I had too many.  Other people saw my guns at shoots and such and were very complementary.  Of course, that was flattering to me, because I saw myself as very much of an amateur wood and metal butcher.  People began to ask me to make them guns and offered what I thought were some pretty nice commissions.  Eventually I caved and took on some commissions.  At first, I liked the idea of being a "professional gunmaker", but it wasn't long before I realized I had made a mistake.  Now I was building what somebody else wanted instead of what had caught my own interest at the time, plus I had a deadline - this gun needed done by X date - instead of just working on guns when I felt like it, I was under pressure.  I also felt great pressure to make a perfect product (and nothing handmade is ever completely perfect).  My stress level was going up and my health down over the gunmaking business more than it did in running my 30 person law firm.  

 

Not only that, but it was a financial disaster.  After buying the parts and putting the hundreds of hours into each gun. I was probably netting about $2.00/hour to do something that was no longer fun.  No sane person practices law for fun, but at least my hourly rate for that work was many, many times better than the gunmaking.

 

So, no photography "business".  If people (especially those who are not dogmen/hunters) who view my images enjoy them and get a sense of what the upland life is all about, that's all I want or need.  As of today, I've had 215,180 visitors to the Flickr site I started in 2016 - most of which are likely non-hunters from all over the world - and they seem to like what they see as I have not yet gotten even one negative comment and many favorable comments.  I figger that has to be good for our sport - payment enough for me.

 

 

Agreed - bottom line, you have an artistic eye that appeals to me and I really have enjoyed your shots. Thank you for sharing them! 

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Fireside

Just wrapped up the 2nd Annual Ryman-type Breeders Gathering & Hunt.  We hold it in Kansas since members love an excuse to get in another week of hunting after many states are closed down.  Weather even held out for us, with temps in the 50's for the last few days.  A couple pics of my own dogs.  Anyone interested to see more pics of classic setters can check out our posts at Ryman-type Setters Gathering photos

 

1 06 2018P1020290.jpg

1 06 2018P1020291.jpg

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Cooter Brown

The old man with the pups backing.

 

Traveller's find on a woodcock.  He's on the left, Ginger the Wonder Pup (9 mos.) in the middle, Jeb (8 mos.)  on the right, another buddy's setter out of frame to the left.

 

If this don't get you goin', friend, you ain't got a pulse.

 

5a5aa41a022b4_TravellerJebGingerBacking1-13-18.thumb.jpg.f6ce41e1cd9fd8514ea75bce106d71c3.jpg

 

 

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Lars

Fog in the valley.   Hun hunting this morning. One covey found and bumped by my crowding dog Colby. 

100_0028.JPG

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Remo
12 minutes ago, Lars said:

Fog in the valley.   Hun hunting this morning. One covey found and bumped by my crowding dog Colby. 

100_0028.JPG

 

Lars, 35 years we drove across southern ID and I thought it would have been fun to hunt that ground. I think we even saw quail at Craters of the Moon, is that possible? Anyway, too late now, but that is an intriguing landscape.

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Lars
32 minutes ago, Remo said:

 

Lars, 35 years we drove across southern ID and I thought it would have been fun to hunt that ground. I think we even saw quail at Craters of the Moon, is that possible? Anyway, too late now, but that is an intriguing landscape.

 

Remo,  According to the Idaho Upland Game distribution brochure there should be no California Quail at Craters of the Moon but it looks as though Chukar and Huns could be in that area. Also Sage Hens. 

My legs sure are getting to old for climbing some of these hills. 

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robp

Last day was January 10, it was a Wednesday this year being "hump day" I thought it appropriate to shoot a hump back. My choice was my a-5 sweet 16 . What a joy to carry and shoot teamed up with some  1 1/8 #5s it really worked nicely I even tried some old school federal  1 1/4 4s I won as a door prize at the sweet 16 shoot in St. Paul .

The weather was in the 30s, dogs worked great. Ilsa my 4 year old has really come a long and I am proud of her. My old dog Rollie is 13 and showing his age a bit which made for a bitter sweet day of sorts. He was pretty stiff  by the time I got home and Thursday was pretty tough on the old man by Friday he was back to his normal self.

I had a great season, my regret is I didn't head south and try to shoot a bob white over the old boy hope I didn't miss our chance

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