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Passing on your firearms

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Craig Doherty

Don't have any special provisions, I'm just glad I'll be gone when my wife finally figures out how many there are and what they're worth.

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I have given quite a bit of thought to this recently . Not just regarding my guns  but with a house full of quilts, dishes, jewelry pictures, etc. With the loss of my wife I’m pretty much alone except for a niece  and nephew both who have yet to establish themselves despite being adults. I have come to realize I have 15 maybe 20 good years left and then I’ll be faced with finding myself a decent assisted living community to move to and being forced to disperse a household of memories .Actually the guns and hunting gear will be the easy part as they are mine and the memories are for the most part just mine  verses shared. So I will slowly down size my guns a process which I have already started. There are a couple of family pieces that I’ll give my nephew who won’t use them but it will fall to him to keep or dispose of them.

  

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MAArcher

I will be buried with a couple.  You never know, what if we get a chance to use them again when we come back in the zombie apocalypse?  

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Salmo

I’m in the same position as some previous posters, no children and a widower. I have made detailed provision in my will for the “good” guns to be donated to a favourite charity and auctioned for fund praising purposes. That particular group is a salmon conservation organization but includes a lot of upland hunting enthusiasts as well so there will be interest.  The rest can be sold or given away by my executor as by then I won’t care.

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Greg Hartman
4 hours ago, MAArcher said:

I will be buried with a couple.  You never know, what if we get a chance to use them again when we come back in the zombie apocalypse?  

 

That's not a bad idea.  If there's an upland Valhalla, maybe we'll need our favorite bird guns in the afterlife.  No - I guess that won't work for me as I am to be cremated and my ashes are to be mixed with those of my dogs and then scattered on my place, the gun club and our favorite uplands.

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Cooter Brown
3 minutes ago, Greg Hartman said:

 

That's not a bad idea.  If there's an upland Valhalla, maybe we'll need our favorite bird guns in the afterlife.  No - I guess that won't work for me as I am to be cremated and my ashes are to be mixed with those of my dogs and then scattered on my place, the gun club and our favorite uplands.

Years back, Bud, who was one of my father's best friends , tried to give the old man a Walther PPK WWII bringback.  Bud was 16 YO when he joined, became a redleg, stayed in after the war and retired a full colonel.  Kind of unusual even then.

 

Dad told him, "Hell no, Bud.  When you die I'm gonna put that damn thing in your casket.  Along with a five dollar gold piece."

 

"Why the hell you gonna do that, George?"

 

"Bud, I don't know where you're goin'.  You might have to buy your way in or shoot your way out!"

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JCJ

My plan is to give them to deserving younger grouse hunting friends that I feel share the same values for the grouse hunting lifestyle as I do.

 

I plan to do so, before I pass, so that I can get joy out of seeing recipients use them for their intended purpose.

 

I’ve been on the receiving end of such gifts,  receiving a handful of fine shotguns and split-cane fly rods and it’s a special transaction. For both parties.

 

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Cooter Brown
4 minutes ago, JCJ said:

My plan is to give them to deserving younger grouse hunting friends that I feel share the same values for the grouse hunting lifestyle as I do.

 

I plan to do so, before I pass, so that I can get joy out of seeing recipients use them for their intended purpose.

 

I’ve been on the receiving end of such gifts,  receiving a handful of fine shotguns and split-cane fly rods and it’s a special transaction. For both parties.

 

No kids here.  This is my plan as well.  Already started with my cousin's son--I've given him a couple already.

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WyomingArt
2 hours ago, Salmo said:

I’m in the same position as some previous posters, no children and a widower. I have made detailed provision in my will for the “good” guns to be donated to a favourite charity and auctioned for fund praising purposes. That particular group is a salmon conservation organization but includes a lot of upland hunting enthusiasts as well so there will be interest.  The rest can be sold or given away by my executor as by then I won’t care.

 

Salmo: well said. Donations to a charity, esp one that includes birds, fish or habitat is a great way to exit.

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pjourn

If you have a special gun but no one to pass it along to, consider writing a note and putting it in the bolt hole of the stock.

I sold a few nice sxs 16s right before my sons were born because I thought we needed the money more than spare double guns. I put a note in the bolt hole under the recoil pad, making note of a memorable trip that I had with my dog and that particular gun and wishing the new owner good dogs and good luck. Maybe they'll never find it, and if they do, they might not care. But I figure if someone keeps the gun and shoots it well, maybe the note will give it a little extra meaning. 

 

 

 

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pa'tridge hunters

When you've got six feet of the good earth on top of you it won't matter. Give them to someone who will enjoy them as much as you do and get the pleasure of seeing the happiness on they're face.

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BlacknTan
34 minutes ago, pjourn said:

If you have a special gun but no one to pass it along to, consider writing a note and putting it in the bolt hole of the stock.

I sold a few nice sxs 16s right before my sons were born because I thought we needed the money more than spare double guns. I put a note in the bolt hole under the recoil pad, making note of a memorable trip that I had with my dog and that particular gun and wishing the new owner good dogs and good luck. Maybe they'll never find it, and if they do, they might not care. But I figure if someone keeps the gun and shoots it well, maybe the note will give it a little extra meaning. 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, this is one of those worthwhile nuggets that comes along all to infrequently on the internet!

 

What a great suggestion!

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Field Grade

I have put scrolled up handwritten notes behind the butt plates of a few guns. Kind of like messages in a bottle. The notes are about the provenance of a gun --- where it came from , who shot it, in one case how many birds he missed in a row ( :P ) ... what dogs he shot over, etc.

 

I also gave my little 12-year-old daughter a couple of my guns, including a 75-year-old Marlin 39A .22 that she likes to shoot.

 

There's the old joke, 'I hope my wife doesn't sell the guns for what I told her I paid for them .'

 

Somehow I think they will get to good homes.

 

-Rob J.

 

 

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mccuha

My fil is a huge gun collector. He has already said that when he passes that all his guns are to be auctioned. He has already got who will Handle the auction. Pretty much all is said and done.  He has a few.  Well a lot of guns I would really like to have so I guess if I want them I’ll have to bid on them like everyone else.  He has 2 daughters.  And a son.  None of them has any interest in guns at all.  I know my wife will try to do what she can to inable me to get the ones I’ve always lusted over.  She does at least understand how I feel about it.  If I had his collection of over 70 yrs and counting like his I just don’t know what I would do. He’s put his entire life and energy acquiring these and will break my heart to see them broken up.  Hopefully though that’s a long ways away.  I don’t have the funds to have a collection of guns like his but I do have a pretty extensive ammo collection that I’ve worked long and hard to put together. I did tell my wife that when I pass that the collection is not shooter ammo and is worth a pretty good bit of money.  I know I need to try and begin to get current values on it and where to go to get it sold.  

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Bede

This thread bums me out. 

 

I'm not too sentimental about material items, but there is just something about items you have shared countless miles in the woods with, or the prairie for some of you, that is different. The idea that a shotgun that represents freedom from obligations and joy and peace in the woods will go to someone that won't appreciate it has me down. It is bad enough with these things are kept on the shelf and never used, but worse still when they are sold down the road to somebody with no attachment whatsoever. I hope those of you that don't have an interested heir in mind find someone who appreciates your firearms (fly rods, pocketknives, whatever the case may be) and puts them to proper use.

 

Currently, I again have two shotguns, nicer than I have any business owning, a 12 and 20 gauge. One for each kid, should I be so blessed that they take up the sport. I also hope I'm a long way from having to give them up!

 

Bede

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