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Canuck

Expensive pheasant

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Ben Hong
57 minutes ago, topdog1961 said:

 

Not meaning to start a war over socialized medicine, but I thought all that stuff was free in Canada. 

Nope, not dentistry!

 

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paul frey
5 hours ago, Canuck said:

I had a badly chipped front tooth years ago and I can say that the world looks at you differently when you are missing a tooth!!

 

I thought you had free medical in Canada:D

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Brad Eden

OK, before this goes where it's going. Ben, a Canada native answered that question. Not dentistry. I'm not moderating yet another canada vs USA socialized medicine thread. Too political. Let's stick to tooth decay. Thank you.

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Brookieslayer
18 hours ago, topdog1961 said:

 

Not meaning to start a war over socialized medicine, but I thought all that stuff was free in Canada. 

nope.... 

The world's view that all our health care in Canada is free is actually just not true. 

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Cooter Brown
9 minutes ago, Brookieslayer said:

nope.... 

The world's view that all our health care in Canada is free is actually just not true. 

I hear pizza with that odd round shaped bacon is free.  Please tell me that's not a myth as well!

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Brookieslayer

myth!

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WyomingArt

Canuck , I feel your pain. literally.  Been there, got the Tee shirt  w/ multiple tooth restorations, and I never even played goalie. :(

 

 Now  my wife won't eat pheasant after she broke  a tooth on a piece of shot. I heard about that for a looooong time, still hearing about it.....

 

Best of luck with the repair and go with your quality provider. My snow bird neighbors go to Nogales MX for dental work, most are happy, some report  the fillings and crowns don't last as long due to material of poor quality. No idea how long crowns etc are supposed to last, mine done in the states are decades old.

 

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idcut

Hope you get the tooth situation squared away Canuck!

 

I had a friend shoot and expensive goose one time, well he didn't actually shoot one, he shot at one, out of a fairly large flock that decoyed in. He was shooting a Marlin bolt action 10 gauge. He, myself and another friend were all calling and when the flock was in range, I yelled take em. At the shot I heard OW, f%$k and a number of other expletives. I turned toward him to see what was going on and he exclaimed "I just broke my f$@king teeth out. Apparently, when I yelled take em, he sat up but didn't let the call fall from his mouth, the bolt from the 10 gauge slammed into the call busting out one of his front teeth. I'm sorry, but I had a heck of time containing myself, to keep from laughing! Later he had a circular bruise on his upper and lower gum lines inside his mouth! 

 

The kicker was, he then wanted to leave for home and the birds had just started flying!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Treerooster

Shot in game birds are kind of fact of life. I try to reduce that though through several ways.

 

First is how I shoot the bird. I try to match the choke and shot selection (how far the bird is before taking the shot) to the situation I am likely to encounter. I like an open choke and I try not to shoot a bird too close...wait and let it get out a ways before shooting to avoid "pillow casing" it.

 

Next is how I clean the bird. Only lightly hit birds get plucked, most all others I fillet the meat off the breast. Filleting is much better to detect shot and feathers in the meat. You can examine the meat from both sides. A deep wound channel that I suspect might contain something gets sliced open and I will dig in it with the tip of the knife. Just a small slice and the slice is really not noticed once cooked. I also soak the meat overnight in water and then re-examine the meat before cooking/freezing.

 

I separate the legs and breast a lot and tend to cook them differently. They are frozen separately too.  Sometimes I will fillet the thighs out, especially if they have been hit with shot. The lower legs are almost always slow cooked to fall-off-the-bone tender. Just too many tendons in the lower legs on the larger birds, especially pheasant & turkey.

 

 

 

 

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Hal Standish

Your thread made me chuckle.. Years ago while out cleaning up at a game farm, three us with our spaniels were bagging some 20 birds Pheasants chukars and Hungarian Partridge's. We were having a ball.

 One of dogs force up a Hun. Myself and my bud both shot at the bird. 35 yards. My bud claimed the kill, I begged to differ. I was using copper plated 6's he was using lead 6's.

After the walk-about he and his brother raced up to the bird cleaning shack. That disputed Hun was the first bird he cleaned copper shot rolled out the bird like lice. He conceded the kill to me. To add injury to the insult late that week his family was eating the bird from the hunt...That's right as he bit down on a piece of Hun breast meat a rear molar slam into a copper plated 6 shot. he presented the shot to me at our next training sessions and a dental bill for the work he had to have done. I think at the time I made the comment that would rather owe it to him than beat him out of it!

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