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max2

For the birders- backyard variations

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Dave in Maine

The Peterson field guides to birds are for Eastern birds, Western birds, and Texas birds.  There seriously are enough to merit a whole guidebook just for Texas.

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oak stob

Raptors gotta eat.

Neat to watch a harrier course corn stubble in KS trying to flush chickens or pheasants.

Watched a group of chickens perform some low level jukes one time....yea, neat.

 

Baltimore oriole seen near the sluggish Ohio today.

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max2

Nothing yet . Looks like snowy wasteland out there.   Quail guy the earliest that I have seen humming birds here is April 10. We get a lot of them . If you are in N.E. Pa your really not that far from me . I am looking forward to the return of all the birds. 

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juneboy1

nm

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juneboy1
On 3/10/2018 at 2:57 PM, quailguy said:

 

 

     Billy, if I remember correctly you are one of the many guys that enjoy watching hummingbirds. Herewith a few pics from our Texas place of hummers:

DSCN2134

 

DSCN0132

 

DSCN2405DSCN2611P1010384Hummingbird1

 

  We have  8-10 different species of hummers recorded in south Texas; the Mexican violetear by far the greatest rarity. People came from all over the US to see him until it was too much bother and I put a stop to it. The wife and I really got into hummers, going to seminars in west Texas and in Arizona on hummers. 

  Well, that is over, we'll look for ruby throats and be content here in NE PA.

Thanks for sharing, in Arkansas we are also a one species state, with an occasional vagrant. My summers are spent in the Rockies (hopefully) and the diversity is very enjoyable. Even then we have nothing like you had in Tejas. I'll get my daughter to send me a pick or two that she has. She is a better photographer then me.

 

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Millriver

A friend of mine just got back from a bird watching trip to Texas. He sent me his list of birds seen. I think it was something like 150 or so. I was blown away by the variety there. Very cool.

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max2

Still nothing.... even the birds don't want to be here :D

On another note there is a bird sanctuary up the road from my house. At certain times there will be a bunch of cars parked and you can see the birders up there with their glass gazing the sky. Next time I notice this perhaps I will grab my bino's and head up there.  

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paul frey

The birds will soon figure out that there is food in your feeders.  I feed from October through April. I buy the bargain seed from Tractor Supply and I have 2 suet cages out.  I would say that I have to refill the feeder every 2-3 days. This also depends if the deer "feed" out of it.  They will get on their hind legs and knock the feeder around to spill it on the ground. 

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Big Al

The other evening in the bay behind my house there was: White Ibis, Snowy Egret, Great Egret, Tricolored Heron and a Roseate Spoonbill.  Also a pair of Mottled ducks.  There were about 20 birds in total.

I know it didn't happen if there isn't a picture but when I remembered to go take the pic they were all gone.  It was really a neat sight.  Don't normally see that many species together like that.

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quailguy

 A few robins arrived yesterday or so. Kinda pitiful watching them hop around in the snow trying to pull a worm out of the frozen ground.

 

  

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charlo slim

The sandhill cranes are drifting northward through here these days.  They come coasting in from the south, then catch the thermals off of our mountain and go spiraling up until they are out of sight... without good binocs anyway. Then off again on their northward journey.  Quite the spectacle.

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Cooter Brown
19 minutes ago, charlo slim said:

The sandhill cranes are drifting northward through here these days.  They come coasting in from the south, then catch the thermals off of our mountain and go spiraling up until they are out of sight... without good binocs anyway. Then off again on their northward journey.  Quite the spectacle.

Montana or Oklahoma?

 

I saw sandhills headed north over a month ago--I was in middle Tennessee at the time.

 

Sandhills are always a spectacle--and a welcome one.  Quite a well evolved dinosaur they are...

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Big Al

White pelicans spend the winter down here.  They have already left to go back up north.  Before they leave we’ll have upwards of about fifty of them behind the house for a couple of days.  They are spectacular flyers also.  Similar to the cranes that Charlo described.

 

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charlo slim
12 hours ago, Cooter Brown said:

Montana or Oklahoma?

 

I saw sandhills headed north over a month ago--I was in middle Tennessee at the time.

 

Sandhills are always a spectacle--and a welcome one.  Quite a well evolved dinosaur they are...

 

SW Oklahoma, Cooter.  We do have a few pioneer breeding sandhills starting to show up in the home Mission Valley of western MT in recent years but it is rare to see more than a dozen or  so at a time, even when they are staging up post-breeding. Pretty sure I have seen a thousand or more filter through here on some heavy migration days.  One of these years I am going to make it up to Nebraska on the Platte.  Just imagine +/- 250k of those pterodactyls swirling around clattering, gotta be an amazing sight... and sound.

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Big Al

A few years back Alex (MTRookie) and I were coming back from ND after a pheasant hunt.  We were on I-94 heading west and we were about 100 miles inside the MT border.  There was a mass migration of Sandhills moving from nw to se crossing the interstate.  As far as you could see in either direction there were the v formations.  Had to be thousands of them.

An incredible sight.

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