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      TO THOSE REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UJ   01/06/2018

      To the Guests who have decided to register for Membership. PLEASE read Terms of Service, not just checking it off. This is covered there: Add more info than just "hunting" or "Upland hunting" or "birds" or "outdoors" or similar nebulous terms in the required INTERESTS field. Despite this Boards strong spam filtering function, some Spam registrations do sneak through. I need an inkling that you are a human being not a Spam Bot tagging onto key words. Also please do not use a business name as your User Name. Thank you.
Thinblueline

My French Brittany and I Are New to UJ (Warning...Long Introduction)

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Thinblueline
1 hour ago, SLR said:

I think you have the right plan to take your companion hunting with you and see what happens. I am used to champion bred setters that point right out of the whelping box, so I haven't dealt with a reluctant pointer such as your pup. If I were in your shoes, I would give the pup as much exposure to wild birds as you can and I would work him on pigeons with launchers. Buying pigeons could use up a lot of discretionary money so I keep a flock of homers, the pigeon supply is unlimited. It is not a major investment to build a small coop and keep 6 or 8 homers which can do the trick. My friend CzechSM keeps a coop of homers too and he has had people at his grounds working with non pointing pups. He told me he can go through 40 or so birds in a session, doing repeats of dog smelling birds-birds flying, if dog does not point. This kind of repetition is hard to do with wild birds. Maybe you can find a nearby collaborator that has a homer supply. It seems sometimes a dormant instinct to point will just turn on and you are good to go.  I had a lab back in my Nebraska days and one time she pointed a covey of quail. What you want to avoid is letting the pup catch a bird on the ground. Good luck.

A guy I used to work with had a coop with some Homer pigeons that I was able to take advantage of on a couple occasions. That helped me get him over the hump with the gun sensitivity issue....until a hawk or something got into the coop and cleaned them all out. I’m going to try to get him on a few returning woodcock real soon, and hope he has a few encounters that will bring out some points. If that doesn’t work, I’ll do a little more pigeon work. Other than that, I have most of my vacation time set in the fall to get him as much wild bird exposure as possible.

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Thinblueline
2 hours ago, Crazy Horse said:

My little French Britt "Chip" flew in from S. Dakota in Aug of 2013. I had him out hunting in late October of 2013for Quail. He did just fine for a young pup. Pointed and found the downed bird.

Unfortunately for me he still won't retrieve. He'll stay with the downed bird till I arrive and I don't want to subject him to forced fetching. So as others have said, hunt that dog.

 

So where's a photo of your French Britt???????

 

 

Chip Pup.jpg

18-NOV-17b.jpg

I don’t have a clue how to post a picture. All my pictures are on my phone and I’m very technology challenged.

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Crazy Horse

BRAD!!!!!! Please show this man how to post photos.  ;~)

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Wirehair

Welcome from Wisconsin and also a fellow French Brittany.

 

In my limited experiance with French Britt is that they are much softer than other breeds. I went from a Drahthaar to the french brittany.  My pup was more timid/shy of the rest of the litter mates but she had lots of drive when exposed to birds. I thought i did the correct job of gun breaking her and was shooting pigeons over her no problems. well come grouse hunting season I struggled the first time out with her finding birds. She was wearing down and I made the bad decision to shoot a bird she wasn't aware of and it starttled her. 

 From that mistake she was pretty much gun and bird shy. I stopped hunting that fall and worked only on getting her drive up, I let her chase any bird she wanted all in open fields so she could she what was going on and give lots of chase. After lots of birds I slowly eased the gun back. The following fall the first trip I did was to the open prairies for sharptail grouse. She flushed and chased a few and i took some shots and she was doing great. By the end of that week she was holding her points again. From that trip on i've not had any problems and when I get a gun out she gets fired up.  However,  she is not a fan of loud longer distance sounds she can not see, l;ike storms or fireworks.  Not sure how she'd do in a duck blind but just me and the dog in a dove blind she is great and also thick grouse woods. Best thing I did was take the dog to the praires to run.

 

Oh and by the way, I'm no dog trainer. I'd much rather work(train) with a horse or my mules than a dog.   The guy that showed me how to grouse hunt had english and gorden setters and he was a grouse hunting fool. He never field trained, just hunted them and killed alot of grouse over his dogs. 

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Keith Rich

Welcome to this board! I have had 2 brittanies (1 American and 1 French) that did not point steady until their 3rd season - and then they were as steady as any dog can be! Keep the faith - spring woodcock are an excellent training bird until they have nests. When you see the robins, the woodcock are back - good luck:)

 

Keith Rich

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Thinblueline

Thanks for your insight guys. It sounds like what I have experienced with my young dog is not that uncommon for the little Frenchies.

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Thinblueline

Just wanted to give an update on my French Brittany who today, on April Fools Day, is one year and five days old. I’ve stuck with this dog, even though I’ve had to deal with the fact I had never seen my dog point anything in his young life, be it butterfly or game bird, not to mention having to work through a little gun sensitivity this late fall and early winter. 

 

Anyway, with my wife working today on Easter and my grown sons off with their girlfriends, I took my third or fourth trip out to a nearby wildlife area, hoping to catch some spring woodcock. Nothing but a couple distant wild flushes a week or so ago, but

today, for the first time ever, I could hardly believe my eyes when my dog’s Bell went quiet, and I found him buried in a thicket, locked up tight on the prettiest point to my eyes I’ve ever seen. 

 

I stood there for a minute in disbelief, not knowing whether I should reach for my phone for a photo or dig the blank pistol out to drive home the point, no pun intended, that if he will point a bird, I will shoot. Of course I didn’t know what he was pointing since I’ve never seen him point anything, but as soon as I got the gun in hand, a woodcock flushed a few feet from his face, and I cracked off two blank rounds. 

 

I was simply on cloud nine.

 

A short while later, I was following the sound of his Bell making my way back to the vehicle when I came upon him facing in my direction, locked up tight, about 20 yards away, but looking at me. Because he was making eye contact with me, I didn’t know what was going on, so I started to dig the blank gun out just in case. Before I could dig the gun out, a second woodcock flushed between him and me. I was so flustered, the gun got all hung up in my vest, and it was probably 20 seconds before I could fire a shot, with the bird long gone. Dog probably was wondering what the heck I shot at by that time. 

 

Anyway, I am absolutely thrilled to have witnessed this sudden progression in my late blooming dog. It gave me a huge boost of hope for coming hunting seasons that I do have a pointing bird dog to work for me. 

 

I still have a deal with a guy for ten more pigeons, but to be honest, I’m not sure I should mess with them, because he hasn’t shown any propensity to point them. Maybe I should at this point just stick to wild birds now that I’ve seen he will point them? 

 

Anyway, thanks for reading.

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Kansas Bound

That almost brings a tear to my eye. Great to hear and I bet you will still be on cloud nine tomorrow thinking about it.

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Thinblueline
2 hours ago, Kansas Bound said:

That almost brings a tear to my eye. Great to hear and I bet you will still be on cloud nine tomorrow thinking about it.

Yeah, I’m still pretty stoked, I’m not gonna lie, LOL. 

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Brad Eden
On 3/15/2018 at 10:41 AM, Crazy Horse said:

BRAD!!!!!! Please show this man how to post photos.  ;~)

 

I'm not well versed on using a third party photo host site these days with this new Board Software we converted to not long ago. That's where you store photos on a photohost site and are given a photo URL to then paste in a post.

 

But, Contributing Members can upload and post photos directly to posts. Info on Contributing Member/Donating: Member Groups/Priviliges

 

For that Group When making a Post at bottom left of the post field you will see Click to choose files

 

Click it and you will see options ranging from choosing a photo from a photo library on your computer or tablet or phone to taking a photo from a device to dragging and dropping a photo file from a computer.

 

Here is a more specific Topic on the Contributing Member Photo Upload process etc.: UJ Photo Uploading/Resizing

 

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Felix

I won't be a lot of help but may be able to save you a few bucks on pigeons.  I haven't tried it, but have heard that you can tie an 18" string with a 5"x 5" piece of cardboard on it to a pigeons leg.  When you flush them, they can still take off but can only fly 100 yards or less because of the weight and wind resistance of the cardboard. Then you can catch them and reuse them.  You'll need a helper as someone must hold the dog to keep it from chasing. (you should do this in a large field so they don't get hung up in a tree). Maybe someone on board has tried this technique and can verify if it works?

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WI Outdoor Nut

Thinblue - sounds like you are on your way.  Late to join this post, but might be able to help.  I am also in NE WI fwiw.

 

The woodcock are in, as I saw about 10 males last night alone in an area less than 5 acres.  PM me and I can point you in a few directions that might help you find some.  I know of a place or two that also have birds you can work your dog on for free, but you will need to PM me for that intel. 

 

As others have mentioned, I would join NAVHDA.  That is where I cut my training teeth and glad I did.  I don't necessarily buy into all they do, but overall a great group of people.  Clubs in the kettles, Madison area and Stevens Point. 

 

From the sounds of where you are, I would continue to build bird drive.  Put away the cap gun for the time being and just focus on that dog building more bird drive than it can handle and go from there. 

 

My main hunting partner has French brits.  Neat dogs for sure. 

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spring

Nice intro as has been said.  Similarly, I've been a lab guy and love them, but added a French Brittany in mid 2016; he just completed his training in Jan 2018.  Our plan was that my pup would also learn from a highly trained French Brittany that my son had, but the older died stunningly after he came up sick and had to be put down one day after a hunt 2 months ago (Blastomycosis).   Anyway, my pup was suddenly on his own, but his development since has been really exciting.  Below is an example of him working to find some birds recently; hard to see them after they flush but the dog working is the point.

Our dogs are young, but by keeping them on birds, I think the future is bright.

 

French Brittany training

 

 

French brit training with my lab

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Kansas Bound
23 minutes ago, spring said:

Nice intro as has been said.  Similarly, I've been a lab guy and love them, but added a French Brittany in mid 2016; he just completed his training in Jan 2018.  Our plan was that my pup would also learn from a highly trained French Brittany that my son had, but the older died stunningly after he came up sick and had to be put down one day after a hunt 2 months ago (Blastomycosis).   Anyway, my pup was suddenly on his own, but his development since has been really exciting.  Below is an example of him working to find some birds recently; hard to see them after they flush but the dog working is the point.

Our dogs are young, but by keeping them on birds, I think the future is bright.

 

 

 

French brit training with my lab

Nice video and great looking brit

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