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Thinblueline

Emergency Tools/Supplies For Bird Coat/Vest

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Thinblueline
2 hours ago, Cooter Brown said:

In my mind avoidance training your dog on porkies is requirement for any dog that hunts in porkie country.  I've done it with fresh road killed porkies with good success.

 

In addition to the stuff mentioned already--pretty much all of which I carry except cutters--I have a way to start a fire, a spare whistle and compass, a small survival type space blanket, extra batteries--it all goes in a small kit in my vest.  Electrical tape is the best thing I've found for securing bandages and vet wrap (great stuff) on dog's legs etc.

 

I have a leash made of woven paracord that can be configured as a gun sling.  This could prove invaluable if you are forced to carry a dog any distance.  I got it from a buddy of mine who knows a guy who makes them.

 

Something I didn't see mentioned is a Leatherman type tool with a Phillips screwdriver.  Indispensable.

The make shift gun sling is a fantastic idea. Who wants to hide their prized bird gun in the woods.

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Hub
13 hours ago, Thinblueline said:

Like many of you, I’ll probably carry a Leatherman type tool for quill extraction if the quills are in an area I feel like I can extract them without causing more damage. I’ve heard that quills are full of air (thus the reason some fishermen use quills as bobbers), and if you first trim the tips with scissors, quill extraction is easier and less painful for the dog. Does anybody have any experience with that tidbit and/or carry a small scissors for that purpose? 

Quills are hollow, but trimming the ends off doesn't make them any easier to extract.  Just the opposite it true.  You will have reduced the surface area to grab the quill and given the dog more time to push quills deeper or snap the ends off.  If you look at a quill under a microscope you will see that they are 'scaled' almost like a fish.  Trimming isn't going to help remove them.  Some people also say pouring vinegar on them prior to pulling helps.  I think that is also BS.  The best thing you can do is to pull them strait away before the dog has time to paw at and break them or push them deeper.

 

I also keep large zip ties and a cable cutter in my vest.

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Cold Iron
3 hours ago, braque du upstate said:

Meh, traps fall under Bigfoot sightings. I know a guy , who knows a guy , who's brother's uncle  got whacked by a bear trap. 220 are a possibility . Grow man should be able to deal with one sans tools. 99% percent of 220 are wired to something for a very good reason . Time is money on a trap line. animals routinely survive, and run off with traps. Most are efficient/ humane killing tools for target species.   They are designed for 10 lb or under animals . Coon ,fisher Martin.. They aren't designed for dogs. Breed is a factor.  Cocker head is similar to a coon. Most bird dog anatomy is significantly different.   I've pulled very much alive opposums out of 220 . 220 aren't intuitive.  takes 2 minutes of hands on experience to learn what you need to know.  The car ride is 1000x more dangerous.  Porkies suck. Snares can be nightmare. I would give traps healthy respect. lightning kills people every year. I wouldn't fly a kite in a thunderstorm.  I wouldn't get myself worked up about traps,  or acts of god. I personally carry a leatherman.  Basic working knowledge of traps/ first aid is a great idea. Fur prices should keep all but a few from the woods. 

 

I got my first $100 bill in the early 1970's from trapping fur and a large number of those pelts came from conibears. I don't exactly agree with the above and Conibear traps. Here are half a dozen people in Mn. that lost their hunting dogs to 220 conibears in a few short months that don't agree either. 

 

At a minimum I carry-

benadryl in a small squirt bottle
 EMT gel
 3 (in case one breaks) zip ties 36" rated strength of 175 pounds or more
cable cutters, wire cutters will not work on snares. Fourtrax57 had one of his dogs caught in a snare in the Spring in an area we hunt. Trappers don't always remove their traps and snares after the season is over. Responsible ones do, but...
 hemostats
 leatherman tool
 quikclot clotting sponge
 vet wrap tape

 

These are always in my vest

21956514473_e915dac515_b.jpg

 

For porkies anytime is a good time for avoidance training. Don't recommend doing it on live ones but it happens. Dogs ears are laid back because I am laying on the collar. Last time he ever messed with one though.

 

28113954394_607361faca_b.jpg

 

I also use a Garmin Alpha and a TT15. Seconds do matter, be it a wolf or a connibear.

 

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Brad Eden

Good thread for everyone to review yearly. Pinned at top of this Forum. (Welcome to the Board  thinblueline, good to have you.)

 

 

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shinbone
1 hour ago, Cold Iron said:

 

21956514473_e915dac515_b.jpg

 

 

 

What brand/model are those cable cutters?

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Millriver

My Gerber tool is square nose, not needle nose. I found that works better pulling quills, and yes I have experience. However, all 3 dogs I've dealt with have ended up at a vets under anesthesia. Too many quills in the mouth. 2 dogs  were mine, one was someone else's.

 

I carry some vet wrap and a tube of glucose gel in my vest. The glucose is in case a dog overheats. Yes, Ive used that as well. My full first aid kit is in the truck should I need it: suture kit, eye wash, sterile water, EMT gel and spray, bandages, foot care stuff, etc. I think I'm well equipped for anything until I can get to a vet.

 

For what it's worth, a 330 or 220 Conibear would kill one of my Cockers in short order. I've only ever seen one set, that was in Vermont. I know how to use those traps, but I think I'll pick up the cable ties though. Won't hurt to carry them.

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oak stob

I found a box set #220 baited with a chunk of bacon about 75 yards from a KS WIHA pull-off...yes, it is a good idea to prepare for worst case.

Not likely still equals worst case.

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Cold Iron
1 hour ago, shinbone said:

What brand/model are those cable cutters?

I bought them at home depot years ago but Amazon sells them Wiss 0890CSFW 

 

If I was to do it over again and still may would get these instead because I know they will work with stainless. I've used mine on galvanized but not SS yet. The top of the line and what many trappers use are the Felco C7 You know those are going to work no matter what. They are heavy though.

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braque du upstate
1 hour ago, Cold Iron said:

 

I got my first $100 bill in the early 1970's from trapping fur and a large number of those pelts came from conibears. I don't exactly agree with the above and Conibear traps. Here are half a dozen people in Mn. that lost their hunting dogs to 220 conibears in a few short months that don't agree either. 

 

At a minimum I carry-

benadryl in a small squirt bottle
 EMT gel
 3 (in case one breaks) zip ties 36" rated strength of 175 pounds or more
cable cutters, wire cutters will not work on snares. Fourtrax57 had one of his dogs caught in a snare in the Spring in an area we hunt. Trappers don't always remove their traps and snares after the season is over. Responsible ones do, but...
 hemostats
 leatherman tool
 quikclot clotting sponge
 vet wrap tape

 

These are always in my vest

21956514473_e915dac515_b.jpg

 

For porkies anytime is a good time for avoidance training. Don't recommend doing it on live ones but it happens. Dogs ears are laid back because I am laying on the collar. Last time he ever messed with one though.

 

28113954394_607361faca_b.jpg

 

I also use a Garmin Alpha and a TT15. Seconds do matter, be it a wolf or a connibear.

 

The one guy shot his dog .... bleeding from the nose on the pointer scenario.  It absolutely occurs . Trap deaths are the boogie man , they are exploited to the highest level.  Record the top 100 dog fatalities, traps wouldn't come close to making the list. carry cable ties or bolt cutters if it makes you fell better.  I don't know a dog owner that hasn't had a dog hit by a car / close call .  A stick; a hole, mineshaft, bee sting , etc,  etc. I can undoubtedly find lightning strike deaths. bad stuff happens . tick bites killed my last 2 dogs.  Don' t think I've removed 10 ticks in the last decade. If it's your time , it's your time. Maybe it's a poison mushroom, maybe it's 1000 other scary things. Benydrl?  Something to induce vomiting?  Epi pen would most likely serve you better. I'm a ex EMT, combat medic, registered nurse , infrequent trapper. I'm better equipped than many to deal with medical emergencies.  Dumb stuff kills your dog . They eat a sock, they get heat stroke, they chase a deer and  get lost. watch a dog die from bloat , then tell me how important it is to feed a dog before hunting. STUPID dog treats, bones, dog food, toys kill thousands every year.  The woods are potentially dangerous, not everyone is prepared to own a working dog. Sporting dogs can pay the price. I' ll chose the big bad wolf over the game farm. I'm a big baby when it comes to my pups.  my pup running off for 20 minutes has made me cry like a baby . Can' t read a post on uj about dog passing without getting worked up.  First aid kit is great, knowing how to use any of it even better. To randomly select traps to crusade against seems strange to me.  Topic pops up every year . I probably comment on most . My heart empathises with any dog related death.  I can't abandon rational thought or reason. people need to do what they feel is best. 

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Cold Iron
20 minutes ago, braque du upstate said:

The one guy shot his dog .... bleeding from the nose on the pointer scenario.  It absolutely occurs . Trap deaths are the boogie man , they are exploited to the highest level.  Record the top 100 dog fatalities, traps wouldn't come close to making the list. carry cable ties or bolt cutters if it makes you fell better.  I don't know a dog owner that hasn't had a dog hit by a car / close call .  A stick; a hole, mineshaft, bee sting , etc,  etc. I can undoubtedly find lightning strike deaths. bad stuff happens . tick bites killed my last 2 dogs.  Don' t think I've removed 10 ticks in the last decade. If it's your time , it's your time. Maybe it's a poison mushroom, maybe it's 1000 other scary things. Benydrl?  Something to induce vomiting?  Epi pen would most likely serve you better. I'm a ex EMT, combat medic, registered nurse , infrequent trapper. I'm better equipped than many to deal with medical emergencies.  Dumb stuff kills your dog . They eat a sock, they get heat stroke, they chase a deer and  get lost. watch a dog die from bloat , then tell me how important it is to feed a dog before hunting. STUPID dog treats, bones, dog food, toys kill thousands every year.  The woods are potentially dangerous, not everyone is prepared to own a working dog. Sporting dogs can pay the price. I' ll chose the big bad wolf over the game farm. I'm a big baby when it comes to my pups.  my pup running off for 20 minutes has made me cry like a baby . Can' t read a post on uj about dog passing without getting worked up.  First aid kit is great, knowing how to use any of it even better. To randomly select traps to crusade against seems strange to me.  Topic pops up every year . I probably comment on most . My heart empathises with any dog related death.  I can't abandon rational thought or reason. people need to do what they feel is best. 

In Mn. and Wi. dogs dying in a trap or snare ARE certainly in the top 100 of dog deaths during hunting season. Different geographic areas have different hazards, certainly not the boogie man out here. It is a real threat. From a threat assessment standpoint it is something to be vigilant of. Can't help but wonder for every bucket set I see in the woods with a 220 in front of it how many more I don't see that are around.

 

No the benedryl is not to introduce vomiting I would carry hydrogen peroxide for that. It is for yellow jacket stings primarily but also effective in other cases. Including me LOL. In the fall the yellow jackets are on the ground nesting and in a very ugly mood. And there are a lot of them until it gets cold enough to put them down for the winter.

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MAArcher

Less than half the price of Ron's setters: https://www.fntpost.com/Products/Trap+Setters/Adlee+T-500+Pull+Type+Chain+Body+Grip+Setter

 

I'm guessing that one of the best pieces of advice regarding dogs in traps is in one of the linked video's, it said to twist the trap on the dog so it was gripping the sides of the neck instead of the top/bottom.  I bet that might buy you a few seconds.  

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EllieGSP

Wow,   this thread got me thinking that I may need some help or possibly an intervention.  After I started looking at everything that has made it into the vest over the years as the 'standard' loadout, it's a good thing the typically bird limit is only three.   Whether hunting from the truck on a corner section or trekking for an afternoon, it stays the same except for food, water and maybe an extra clothing layer. 

 

- Filson Strap Vest, slightly modified with load straps and daisy chain
- 1L Water Bottle
- Collapsable cup, for the pup
- Extra Whistle, for when the pea freezes in the first one:-)
- Headlamp
- Tweezer
- Multitool
- Forceps
- Fingernail Clippers
- First aid kit with the field basics, gauze, EMT Gel, benadryl, aspirin, water tablets, etc.
- Trauma kit, Vacuum-sealed kit to include: gloves, Nasal Airway, Israeli Bandage, Quik Clot Gauze, Tourniquet.
- Gun sling with a carabiner which doubles as dog leash
- Bandana which doubles as a towel
- Ultralight Balaclava,  for those cold mornings or later afternoons.
- Emergency Food - Powerbar, nuts and some peanut butter for the pup.
- A few buckshot shells, for that nuisance coyote.  May need to be removed now....
- 36" zip ties (x3).
- 24" piece of 550 paracord (x2).
- Cable cutters.

 

 

Upland Vest 001_1.jpg

Upland Vest 002_1.jpg

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airmedic1

One thing I forgot to mention that I religiously carry is my SPOT messenger.  I bought it a couple of years ago when I read about a guy that stepped in a hole and broke his leg.  He spent the night out in freezing weather and by his own account was lucky he survived. I hunt by myself a majority of the time and my wife, if she is at the cabin, may not have an idea within 100 miles of where I am.  I move it back and forth from vest to vest and it gives me piece of mind knowing that if I did fall and break my leg, someone would eventually find me.  I only use it during hunting season and and I think it was $230 to activate it last year for three months but what is it worth to have someone rescue you if you are not able to rescue yourself?

AM

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