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Urban_Redneck

Camera advice?

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salmontogue
30 minutes ago, snapt said:

 

Depends on the mirrorless...Lens choices are still better with Nikon and Canon for the money. A d3300 isn't much larger than a mirrorless, packs a very nice 24mp APC sensor, and has better lens selection for the money. A refurb can be had for $295.

 

My wife shoots with a Nikon D5500 which is similar to the D3300, just more gobbledygook features.  It is light and reasonably compact  It was purchased new with two additional lenses when Nikon offered a package deal for a tad over $500 after an instant rebate.

 

I shoot with a Nikon D810 which is a great full frame camera but it is heavier and, therefore, clumsier.  I sometimes use my wife's D5500 when size and weight are considerations.

 

Watch for package deal sales from both Nikon and Canon.  You can save a lot of money.

 

Perk

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BlacknTan

No advice here... I'm not qualified, but...

I needed to upgrade my Canon DSLR last year. After a lot of research, and dissatisfaction with the Canon Consumer Grade lenses, I went mirrorless, with the FujiFilm XT-2, a nice, old school, built like a tank with quality lenses, DSLR-like system...

Unfortunately, it did not help my photographic skills. But, digital allows me to shoot lots of pics to try to find something decent.

 

I sometimes visit this site for tips in operating the camera, and just to look at the photos, that are often amazing!!

 

https://www.fujix-forum.com/

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oak stob

Question on the Sony RX-100V....has anyone experienced any issues from fine dust with the moving parts, lens, cover or ..did I see that particular camera has a pop-up viewfinder?

 

I had a couple small “pocket” cameras and found a pocket, naturally, or basic field use in areas with very fine dust to eventually lock them up...even with air cleaning.

Or, are air puffs a bad thing and causing the problems?

 

Is there a ...best....manner of carry in the field and a better way of keeping moving parts clean?

 

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Urban_Redneck

Any thoughts on the Canon PowerShot SX730 HS? I'm off the DSL idea, realizing I'm much less likely to carry one while toting a shotgun or much else. I like the idea of bluetooth to transfer photos to my I phone.

 

Thanks

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25/06
On 3/31/2018 at 9:13 AM, Greg Hartman said:

I don't know your level of knowledge and skill, so this might not be good advice. 

 

These days, I'd think that a decent P&S-type camera with a reasonable zoom lens would probably serve people who like good snapshots, but who are not into serious photography, much better than a cheapie DSLR.  There is no reason to get a camera with interchangeable lenses unless you are really going to take advantage of that feature with a whole stable of lenses (which will cost you much more than $600 and will be a lot to carry around).  Decent P&S's are probably more useful and versatile than a cheap DSLR.  Of course, high-level DSLR's with high-end lenses are the ultimate tool, but now you are talking about big money, the knowledge and skill needed to take advance of their features; and huge, heavy bags of camera equipment.

 

Recognizing that you get what you pay for, the Panny DMC LX-100 is a very nice camera in the $600 price range with a fast Leica 24-75mm (equivalent) lens and a relatively large (m4/3) sensor.  Here's the DPReview article on it:  https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/buying-guide-best-pocketable-enthusiast-cameras/8

 

DPReview is a great source for info on camera equipment - very thorough analysis - and they can tell you much more than I can here.  Check out their "Buying Guides", like this one: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/buying-guide-best-pocketable-enthusiast-cameras

 

FWIW, I probably taken most of the pics I post here with a tiny P&S camera.  It happens to be a Sony RX-100V - see article here:  https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/buying-guide-best-pocketable-enthusiast-cameras/2  The little Sony runs a bit more than $600, however.

 

I'm pretty serious about upland photography and have a good DSLR system and also a full-frame 42MP camera that gives incredible detail, but most of the time in the field, I opt for the little P&S.  The image quality isn't quite as high as the full-frame camera (but it's more than good enough for posting images here - or really anything less than near-billboard size) and it's not as versatile as the DSLR system, but it's shirt-pocket size and so easy to carry and it handles 98% of the situations I find in the field.  If I'm just doing photography, then I'll carry one of the "better" cameras - otherwise not too often.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Greg,

 

Thank you for this post!

I love your photos, especially your firearm photos.  If I can get results half as good I would be tickled.

I am looking for a new point and shoot.

Is there a way to know if how fast the camera takes a photo? I had one point and shoot camera that seemed to take forever. You would push the button

and the camera would not capture the image for a very long time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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whiskyjack
On ‎2018‎-‎04‎-‎04 at 11:06 AM, oak stob said:

Question on the Sony RX-100V....has anyone experienced any issues from fine dust with the moving parts, lens, cover or ..did I see that particular camera has a pop-up viewfinder?

 

I had a couple small “pocket” cameras and found a pocket, naturally, or basic field use in areas with very fine dust to eventually lock them up...even with air cleaning.

Or, are air puffs a bad thing and causing the problems?

 

Is there a ...best....manner of carry in the field and a better way of keeping moving parts clean?

I have a Pentax WG-1 pocket camera. Takes great pictures, is dust, shock and waterproof. Cool piece of equipment that easily fits your pocket.

For extra protection, I carry it in a small Pelican box. It fits the Model 1015 like it was born there!

Well worth a look.

On ‎2018‎-‎04‎-‎04 at 11:06 AM, oak stob said:

 

 

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Scott Berg
On 4/4/2018 at 7:20 AM, Urban_Redneck said:

mirror v. mirrorless?

 

I'm leaning away from a big DSLR. You guys are right, I'm less likely bring along any camera if that's my only choice.

 

Thanks again,

 

Jim 

 

I have been looking at mirrorless, partially because I want to shoot video and mirrorless doubles the focal length.  The reviews are very good on the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III and you can get the body and lens for $650.  That would allow you to add a telephoto lens at some point if you so desired.

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snapt

My 2 issues with mirrorless:

1. The native lens selection isn't quite to Nikon/Canon territory. Yes there are plenty of good lenses but they're produced in lesser quantities to this point and haven't been on the market long enough to bring their prices down.

2. Consumer grade hasn't quite gotten the focus to where DSLR is.

 

A D3300 is cheaper than most mirrorless options, has a better sensor than most, focuses better on moving subjects, and has better lens selection.

 

Mirrorless is killing it in the Video game, I will give them that for sure.

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caleb
On 4/4/2018 at 9:06 AM, snapt said:

 

Depends on the mirrorless...Lens choices are still better with Nikon and Canon for the money. A d3300 isn't much larger than a mirrorless, packs a very nice 24mp APC sensor, and has better lens selection for the money. A refurb can be had for $295.

 

I bought a Nikon 3400 in January, and I've been very pleased with it.  Total cost was about $300.  Here's Ken Rockwell's (glowing) review: https://kenrockwell.com/nikon/d3400.htm#bad

 

I don't doubt that the mirrorless cameras are nice, but at the $300 pricepoint I think the Nikon 3400 is a pretty great deal.  It would easily leave an extra $100 in the OP's budget for Photoshop.

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snapt

Thom Hogan's reviews are a tad more objective than crazy uncle Ken these days, but he's super high on the the 3300/3400. http://www.dslrbodies.com/cameras/current-nikon-dslr-reviews/nikon-d3400-camera-review.html

 

I'd argue in mirrorless you'd have to spend 600+$ to get something like the Sony A6300 that would be equivalent, but the lens selection is much more pricey. The new Nikon AFP 70-300 VR is dirt cheap and holding its own in reviews to much more expensive lenses. http://www.dslrbodies.com/lenses/nikon-lens-reviews/nikkor-zoom-lens-reviews/nikon-70-300mm-f45-56-af-p.html

There are tones of good 3rd party lenses from Sigma etc that are cheap/super high quality as well.

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juneboy1

My wife is a professional photographer and loves her fujifilm x series mirrorless. Stunning pictures and the added bonus of silence when she pulls the trigger,er, pushes the button. Fuji film makes great cameras. 

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Greg Hartman

Just a few comments to recent posts: 

25/06 – If you can find the camera you want on DPReview, I believe they post a number.  With a modern P&S camera, shutter lag is unlikely to be a problem.  Older P&S’s were really horrible in that regard – you’d press the shutter and by the time the camera obtained focus and exposure, the dog would be 10 yards away.  I haven’t found that to be a problem in years. 

Scott Berg – a camera being mirrorless or not has nothing to do with effective focal length.  That depends on sensor size.  A “full frame” sensor (meaning one the size of a 35mm film negative) will produce effective focal lengths equal to the number printed on the lens – i.e. a 50mm lens will give 50mm results – this is the standard and is often referred to as “equivalency”.  Full-frame sensors tend to be found only in very costly, very high quality cameras.  With other sensors, a factor must be applied to get to equivalency.  An APS-C size sensor (depending on the manufacturer) will have very roughly a 1.5 factor to determine equivalency – i.e. a 50mm lens will work like a 75mm lens on a 35mm camera.  A m4/3 size sensor will have an equivalency factor of 2 – i.e. a 50mm lens will work like a 100mm lens on a 35mm camera.  A high quality P&S camera with a 1” sensor would have roughly a 2.7 factor – so that 50mm lens would perform like a 135mm lens on a 35mm camera.  Using a smaller sensor also effectively reduces both image quality and lens speed (f-stop), but you weren’t talking about that.

All of this is neither good nor bad – it’s just something you need to know when using a particular camera.  For example, if you want a wide-angle lens (say 28mm in 35mm terms) and you put a 28mm lens on a camera with a 1” sensor, you have instead a 95mm telephoto lens.

Snapt – beg to differ.  While the selection may not be as vast as one can find in 50+ years of producing lenses for SLRs, I defy you to name a useful lens you cannot easily find in mirrorless guise.  As with DSLR lenses, there are consumer-grade mirrorless lenses and much more expensive mirrorless lenses of the highest possible quality.  You get what you pay for, as in all things.

One of the major advantages to mirrorless is that there is much less distance between the back of the lens and the sensor than with a DSLR, because there is no big flapping mechanical mirror box, therefore, lenses of the same quality, focal length and speed can be made much smaller.  I.e. a professional quality F2.8 300mm lens for a DSLR is going to be much bigger and heavier than a professional quality F2.8 300mm lens for a mirrorless camera.

Yes, early mirrorless camera lagged behind DSLRs in terms of focus speed and accuracy.  However, modern mirrorless cameras are every bit as good.

Yeah, you can get cheap DSLRs these days and if you aren’t all that serious about what you are doing, it’s hard to fault that choice.  The results will be FAR better than phone pics.  But, I think mirrorless is all there will be in a few years.  They no longer have any real downsides; cameras and lenses are smaller and lighter and more reliable because all of those moving mechanical parts, carefully aligned prisms, etc. are replaced by clever software and fast processors.  Like Juneboy’s wife, I use Fuji equipment for my interchangeable lens camera system – have yet to regret that choice – and they have intuitive analog controls, like and old 35mm film SLR, which translate really well for an old guy like me, as opposed to the more typical computer-type menus that most DSLRs and modern mirrorless cameras use.

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CzechSM

The main issue I have with our point and shoot style D3300 is pinpoint focusing in the environment that I am in a lot. I have to get through thick cover to capture the dog in the manner that I see. Maybe I'm missing something on my settings but I have tried quite a few and really have more fuzzy "would have been great pictures" than clear ones. The D3300 has a manual focus ring but I have found that somewhat useless. I have have put the camera on manual and tried messing with the aperture to change the depth of field but have never really been happy with the results.

 

I need simplistic when I use a camera as my main focus in the dog and I don't want a complicated fortune hanging around my neck while stumbling through a swamp. I guess everything has a trade off. I do have a case I carry the camera in and will be looking at binocular cases that might make carrying the camera more protected and also create easy access.

 

These are the kind of pictures create all kinds of focusing hassle.

 

i-2xc5P3q-X2.jpg

 

DSC_0023-X2.jpg

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oak stob

I can relate to the photo difficulty amongst the buggy whips.

 

Beautiful setter, by the way.

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Greg Hartman
14 minutes ago, CzechSM said:

The main issue I have with our point and shoot style D3300 is pinpoint focusing in the environment that I am in a lot. I have to get through thick cover to capture the dog in the manner that I see. Maybe I'm missing something on my settings but I have tried quite a few and really have more fuzzy "would have been great pictures" than clear ones. The D3300 has a manual focus ring but I have found that somewhat useless. I have have put the camera on manual and tried messing with the aperture to change the depth of field but have never really been happy with the results.

 

I need simplistic when I use a camera as my main focus in the dog and I don't want a complicated fortune hanging around my neck while stumbling through a swamp. I guess everything has a trade off. I do have a case I carry the camera in and will be looking at binocular cases that might make carrying the camera more protected and also create easy access.

 

These are the kind of pictures create all kinds of focusing hassle.

 

 

I don't have any magic answers fro you - sorry.  In those sorts of conditions, pretty much any camera is going to grab focus on a close subject (one of the whips, brush, etc) and the real subject (the dog) will be out of focus.  Happens to me all the time - and this is why nearly all of my dog pic are taken in relatively open areas.  There are really only two solutions - and maybe the best one is a combination of both methods.

 

The first is manual focus.  It looks like you used this method in the second image.  You turn off the autofocus and manually focus on the dog.  Some modern cameras do that very well and have several handy focusing aides that you can pick from in different situations, like red outlining or zebra stripes - my Fuji is very good at this.  Unfortunately, many modern cameras take the approach that manual focusing is something that is only going to be rarely done and they make it inconvenient, slow and hard to do - my Sony is like this.  If you have one of the cameras with an awkward manual focus implementation, then it will probably be tough to focus on the dog without taking forever.

 

The second is depth of field (DOF).  It looks like you used this method in the first image. The smaller the aperture, the larger the DOF (area that is in focus).  If the DOF is large enough, things from close to far will all be in focus, hopefully including the dog.  But, small apertures also mean less light reaches the sensor - so, slower shutter speed and/or higher ISO is needed and there may be times in thick woods where there just isn't enough light to use a really small aperture.  No free lunch here.

 

By combining both methods in advance you can sometimes have a pretty high degree of success,  For example, you figured the dog will be somewhere between 5 and 15 yards away from you when you take the pic, so you set the camera in advance to manual focus at 10 yards.  Then, you use an aperture just small enough to get everything between 5 and 15 yards in focus.  So long as things work out as anticipated (i.e. dog is somewhere between 5 and 15 yards), your pics will be keepers and all you have to do is point and shoot.

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