Jump to content
FRIENDLY REMINDER ABOUT HUNTING REPORTS/TOPICS... Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
U.P. Grouse Hunter

manual bird launchers

Recommended Posts

U.P. Grouse Hunter

How well do they work? I have about $400 to spend, so I could get one remote launcher, or several manual ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keith E. Carlson

They work fine.

But, a cautionary tale.

"Freddie", several Brits ago, wised up quickly.  At five months old, I started him on pigeons as I had done in the past.

On the first bird, he was interested in the strange smell and kind of pointed. 
When I launched the bird he got excited and chased it until I called him back.

On the second bird, he readily pointed.    I pulled the green cord, the bird pooped out and I shot it for a retrieve.

On the third bird, "Freddie" pointed the smell but was watching me reach for the green cord.  He was ready to go when I pulled the cord.

End of lessons with the pigeon popper.

"Freddie" did turn out to be a hell of a dog, tho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Remo

I built a half dozen toe traps out of scrap metal for almost nothing. They work pretty good for me.  There is a topic on UJ if you search "toe kick trap". I can't get the link to post.

883_3_0_0.JPG

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rick Hall

Can't post pics here, but my "manual launchers" were dark baby socks with about 6' of cord sewn to their toes and perhaps a foot of hunter orange flagging ribbon tied to the cord's loose end.  Slip the sock over a pigeon, chukar or whatever's head, and it becomes "blind" and immobile, and will stay were you put it.  Then hang the end with the flagging on a high weed where you can spot it from a distance and go cut Pup loose.  When Pup points, you walk in and pull the string, and a pigeon will almost always fly on its own when the sock comes off and it sees the sky, while more ground-bound species, like chukar, may need a bit more encouragement, depending on how much the sock tugged on them coming off.

 

Greatest thing about using hoods is that a half-dozen of them, or more if you wish, fit in a pocket (keep mine in the side pocket of my bird bag) and are readily picked up and pocketed again as used, so there are no separate trips around the field to place or recover cages or mechanical devices.

 

Pretty sure I learned that slick trick right here during the very early days of UJ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oak stob
15 hours ago, U.P. Grouse Hunter said:

How well do they work? I have about $400 to spend, so I could get one remote launcher, or several manual ones.

 

They work well.

 

I would consider both a remote trap(s) and step ons release trap(s) for the costs involved.

 

Needing to work with my Gordon, I am glad that I have both in order to set up a situation(two traps) where any movement of the dog on the first bird gives me the chance to remotely release the back trap bird, for example.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
browndrake

First, let me disclose that I'm not a dog trainer..but I do train my dogs. I don't know what the pros and the trialers want from their dogs. I just know what I want out here where I hunt.

 

In my experience, it depends greatly on the training/manners of the dog, what your objective is using them, and how you really want your dog to work.  If the dog points and holds pretty well then manuals work well.  If not, they can be a problem.

 

I want my dogs to point as soon as they know where the bird is. I want them to hold until released...generally... On pheasant, I want my dog to relocate if the bird does. Having both is not always an easy thing to get.  I did have a DK that naturally did this.

 

I use launchers to help keep my dogs honest.  Once the bird is established, if my dog creeps, the bird is released. Sometimes that is from 5 feet and sometimes from 50+ yards...the longer distances are not possible with manual launchers.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CzechSM
1 hour ago, browndrake said:

First, let me disclose that I'm not a dog trainer..but I do train my dogs. I don't know what the pros and the trialers want from their dogs. I just know what I want out here where I hunt.

 

In my experience, it depends greatly on the training/manners of the dog, what your objective is using them, and how you really want your dog to work.  If the dog points and holds pretty well then manuals work well.  If not, they can be a problem.

 

I want my dogs to point as soon as they know where the bird is. I want them to hold until released...generally... On pheasant, I want my dog to relocate if the bird does. Having both is not always an easy thing to get.  I did have a DK that naturally did this.

 

I use launchers to help keep my dogs honest.  Once the bird is established, if my dog creeps, the bird is released. Sometimes that is from 5 feet and sometimes from 50+ yards...the longer distances are not possible with manual launchers.

 

^^ Yep

 

Perhaps you could check on Craig's List or Birddog Swap and Trade classified to purchase used launchers verses new to get a couple for the price of a new one. For training alone the remote launchers are great for the applications I generally use.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bmeador

I have 2 DT509 auto launchers and 3 wire cage manual launchers.  Love both types.  I can pre-load them and run down the road to one of my fields and set them out.  Let them "soak" for a bit before I get back with the dog/s.  I use pigeons.  Really like the rolling hay fields with about 20 - 24 inches of cover - simulates some of the plains covers.  I mark each one with a wooden or fiberglass dowel with a touch of blaze orange on the top section.  I also train in the woods simulating grouse and WC.  The traps and homing pigeons have really helped out my dogs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fishvik

I use pigeons for training. I use small plastic baskets that I camo paint. I just walk up and kick them. I use the "length of garden hose" tied to the legs method of limiting flight. The baskets are stackable for packing them in or out of the field.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
U.P. Grouse Hunter

 

On 4/8/2018 at 12:05 PM, browndrake said:

First, let me disclose that I'm not a dog trainer..but I do train my dogs. I don't know what the pros and the trialers want from their dogs. I just know what I want out here where I hunt.

 

In my experience, it depends greatly on the training/manners of the dog, what your objective is using them, and how you really want your dog to work.  If the dog points and holds pretty well then manuals work well.  If not, they can be a problem.

 

I want my dogs to point as soon as they know where the bird is. I want them to hold until released...generally... On pheasant, I want my dog to relocate if the bird does. Having both is not always an easy thing to get.  I did have a DK that naturally did this.

 

I use launchers to help keep my dogs honest.  Once the bird is established, if my dog creeps, the bird is released. Sometimes that is from 5 feet and sometimes from 50+ yards...the longer distances are not possible with manual launchers.

 

 

I've got a young Setter and he is not pointing yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
U.P. Grouse Hunter
On 4/8/2018 at 1:41 PM, CzechSM said:

 

^^ Yep

 

Perhaps you could check on Craig's List or Birddog Swap and Trade classified to purchase used launchers verses new to get a couple for the price of a new one. For training alone the remote launchers are great for the applications I generally use.

 

Thanks, I'll look for used ones!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×